View Full Version : I remember an old science class


Mohammed
03-26-11, 09:25 AM
When I was around 14 my interest in biology was limited, so I didn't really like it. Science text books were missed up. a lot of scienitific facts are not tought because they are "against God".

But I remember one day my science teacher came and gave us a lesson about adaptation. I was fascinated, I felt I'm very adaptive, I have always felt very adaptive, and what drives me are bad emotions like fear and depression. And I think my strong adaptability came from AS. I have this weird feeling that I can overcome AS.

fracturedstory
03-26-11, 07:42 PM
This isn't a common AS trait. It doesn't mean you don't have AS, just that you might have it mildly. This trait is almost non existent in classic autism. My lack of adapting to situations is what holds me back from most things and is the cause for most if not all of my meltdowns.

Having narrow interests is common.

Offle
03-26-11, 08:13 PM
I always like studying about adaptation in science. it's one of the few things in science I never found boring.

I've neve been good with change though. It makes me nervous and I always have a hard time adjusting to it. Even just rearranging a room or redecorating it makes me uncomfortable or makes me freak out a little.

Mohammed
03-26-11, 09:39 PM
This isn't a common AS trait. It doesn't mean you don't have AS, just that you might have it mildly. This trait is almost non existent in classic autism. My lack of adapting to situations is what holds me back from most things and is the cause for most if not all of my meltdowns.

Having narrow interests is common.

what's the difference between mild AS and normal asperger?

Mohammed
03-26-11, 11:16 PM
I always like studying about adaptation in science. it's one of the few things in science I never found boring.

I've neve been good with change though. It makes me nervous and I always have a hard time adjusting to it. Even just rearranging a room or redecorating it makes me uncomfortable or makes me freak out a little.
Is there a reason why you're uncomfortable with rearranging a room?

Mohammed
03-26-11, 11:19 PM
Aren't there any drugs that are used in therapy to overcome the lack of adaptability?

Offle
03-26-11, 11:45 PM
Is there a reason why you're uncomfortable with rearranging a room?

Because it's not what I'm used to. I like things to stay reasonably the same. I'm familiar with the way the old room works. I'm comfortable in it. If I decide to rearrange the room it's not so bad, it's when others decide to or design it without me.


As far as medication for adaptability I don't think so. I think the best you could do would be anti-antxiety pills, but I'm not too well educated in this area.

Fortune
03-27-11, 12:27 AM
Is there a reason why you're uncomfortable with rearranging a room?

I have this problem too - when the living room gets rearranged, I get confused and a bit frustrated until I can process that it is still the living room.

Some change I can handle, some change stops me cold, and some change pretty much blows me out of functionality. I've been known to stop using particular websites for a week or two after they changed their layout.

fracturedstory
03-27-11, 06:38 AM
what's the difference between mild AS and normal asperger?
Mild Asperger's is when you aren't as affected by your symptoms or don't have as many, or you can get by in life a bit better than those with just Asperger's.

There is no drug you can take to help you cope with change. I was on an SSRI once and that still didn't make a difference.

The autistic brain likes familiarity. Almost every symptom is about not doing well with change or liking things to be the same. The social environment changes a lot and there are no concrete rules so these situations are confusing. We also like to eat the same meals or wear the same clothes or have a routine. I even find when the environment is slightly different that I become uncomfortable.

Mohammed
03-27-11, 10:52 AM
Mild Asperger's is when you aren't as affected by your symptoms or don't have as many, or you can get by in life a bit better than those with just Asperger's.

There is no drug you can take to help you cope with change. I was on an SSRI once and that still didn't make a difference.

The autistic brain likes familiarity. Almost every symptom is about not doing well with change or liking things to be the same. The social environment changes a lot and there are no concrete rules so these situations are confusing. We also like to eat the same meals or wear the same clothes or have a routine. I even find when the environment is slightly different that I become uncomfortable.

Wow, that's very valuable information, thanks!

I eat the same food a billion times in a row too, but something inside me gets bored fast with my environment. So I love it when a season changes. I also loved the idea of leaving the desert that I lived in for 20 years and go to a snowy forest. I hate snow, but Canada for me is 1000 times better than what I'm used to(Saudi). I also abandoned many traditions and beliefs that I used to believe in.

I used my first cellphone for 6 years, most of my friends change their cellphones every 6 months. I never cared about cellphones, cars, or watching sports. I used to think it is just me. I also enjoyed spending time with friends or people I like. and I can feel lonely very fast. and I hate feeling alone. I think it's what drives me to improve my social skills.

I found something called high functioning autism, I got confused when I read it, I've been reading too much about autism that I started to mix them with each other. I might have HFA too, but I'm currently ignorant about it.

Mohammed
03-27-11, 10:54 AM
Because it's not what I'm used to. I like things to stay reasonably the same. I'm familiar with the way the old room works. I'm comfortable in it. If I decide to rearrange the room it's not so bad, it's when others decide to or design it without me.


As far as medication for adaptability I don't think so. I think the best you could do would be anti-antxiety pills, but I'm not too well educated in this area.

Have cocaine or ecstasy been tested for autism therapy?

Mohammed
03-27-11, 10:58 AM
I have this problem too - when the living room gets rearranged, I get confused and a bit frustrated until I can process that it is still the living room.

Some change I can handle, some change stops me cold, and some change pretty much blows me out of functionality. I've been known to stop using particular websites for a week or two after they changed their layout.

I have the same problem with websites. I hate it when websites change. Because my brain has a set and it takes time to update it.

How did you handle it as a child when your parents rearranged a house? Do you have trouble changing your home?

Fortune
03-27-11, 11:13 AM
I have the same problem with websites. I hate it when websites change. Because my brain has a set and it takes time to update it.

How did you handle it as a child when your parents rearranged a house? Do you have trouble changing your home?

I don't recall what specifically I did when things got rearranged when I was a child. I mainly remember that schedule changes made me feel deeply betrayed and upset.

Edit: Not to imply that this has ever stopped.

Fortune
03-27-11, 11:18 AM
I found something called high functioning autism, I got confused when I read it, I've been reading too much about autism that I started to mix them with each other. I might have HFA too, but I'm currently ignorant about it.

HFA and Asperger's Syndrome are both on the autistic spectrum, so if you are diagnosed with one, you're not going to have the other. Some professionals (like Tony Attwood) say that the two are practically the same in terms of outcome, and others say that there are clear distinctions between the two categories.

tipoo
03-27-11, 12:11 PM
But I remember one day my science teacher came and gave us a lesson about adaptation. I was fascinated, I felt I'm very adaptive, I have always felt very adaptive, and what drives me are bad emotions like fear and depression. And I think my strong adaptability came from AS. I have this weird feeling that I can overcome AS.

I thought typical cases of AS involved being bad with change, not being so adaptive. It doesn't prove or disprove it alone though, could be atypical.

Offle
03-27-11, 03:40 PM
I have this problem too - when the living room gets rearranged, I get confused and a bit frustrated until I can process that it is still the living room.

Some change I can handle, some change stops me cold, and some change pretty much blows me out of functionality. I've been known to stop using particular websites for a week or two after they changed their layout.

I've done that before. I used to go to a website all the time, I forget what it's called now, but after they changed their colour and set up I stopped going because it confused and the new colour gave me a head ache. I hate dark yellows and oranges, they make me feel sick.

Mohammed
03-27-11, 05:01 PM
HFA and Asperger's Syndrome are both on the autistic spectrum, so if you are diagnosed with one, you're not going to have the other. Some professionals (like Tony Attwood) say that the two are practically the same in terms of outcome, and others say that there are clear distinctions between the two categories.

Thanks. I will find out which one and hopefully I will start a therapy.

Fortune
03-27-11, 05:02 PM
Thanks. I will find out which one and hopefully I will start a therapy.

Odds are you'll be diagnosed with AS if you are on the spectrum at all.

fracturedstory
03-27-11, 07:05 PM
Yeah I have HFA, although as a kid my symptoms were more severe than many HFA kids I've come across that were younger. So I'm more of a moderate autist. With me I don't desire friendships though don't mind having them when they come around. I'm at a loss what to do with them though. I'm more of a hang out with once every 3 months (if I'm not engrossed in my special interests) and really I can be looked upon as quite selfish when really I've just got no idea what to do, or how to show that I actually do care. And when I get into arguments with friends, no matter how small, if they say something that I find extremely insulting, I'll end the friendship then and there.
I also don't get lonely if I haven't socialized for ages. I pretty much just stop thinking about it. People with AS will want friends and feel lonely when they can't have any or lose friends due to not having the best social skills.
AS is like very high functioning autism. HFA is like having classic autistic symptoms i.e speech delays, developmental delays and most if not all of the symptoms which really do affect your life.

Fortune
03-28-11, 05:14 AM
I don't usually feel lonely when I'm not socializing. I have to remind myself to keep up with people (hence my cyclic chat overdose, among other things), and still constantly lose touch with people and don't really think much of it until they ask me if I'm mad at them.

I think...while AS is defined as lacking developmental delays, that most people diagnosed with AS actually do have developmental delays. I loaned out my copy of Attwood's book, but he goes into some detail on this. It was interesting that he pointed out that the criteria for AS actually describes a speech delay (although obviously it's not required).

I think a lot of people come across as "very high functioning" but I am not sure that many would really qualify as "very high functioning," and I think the symptoms really do affect one's life (they certainly affect mine).