View Full Version : Sometimes...


eggyolkes
03-28-11, 11:05 AM
Sometimes I am convinced that I have autism, moreso, aspergers.

I mean, there is also a chance that I "picked up" the different behaviors from others, but, some things like having a hard time reading emotions, you cannot pick up.

Does anyone know much about "atypical" autism?

fracturedstory
03-29-11, 07:07 PM
Atypical autism is when you don't exactly fit enough criteria to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. You're more likely to get a PDD-NOS diagnoses.

But if you didn't have enough symptoms to autism then why is a it such a worry? I'm just curious. Not being able to read emotions could be a lack of focus thing. Unless you tried meds and it still didn't work. Medication makes my reading people worse.

It's better if you list your symptoms so I can see if you could be anywhere on the spectrum.

Lunacie
03-29-11, 07:36 PM
My granddaughter was given the diagnosis of atypical autism because she is able to look at faces although she can't "read" them, she can express emotions although not always appropriately, enjoys cuddling, and wants to play with other children although she doesn't understand social cues enough to fit in very well.

Atypical autism is diagnosed when someone doesn't meet the diagnostic criteria for autism. That is if there are not sufficient abnormalities in one, two or all three of the areas of psychopathology required for a diagnosis of autism, namely:
1) reciprocal social interactions
2) communication
3) restrictive, stereotyped, repetitive behaviour

So, she doesn't meet the criteria for reciprocal social interaction, although she is far from "normal" in that regard she isn't as severely impacted as needed for a diagnosis of autism. Even though she had a severe developmental disorder in receptive language, she has managed to communicate much better now.

I know much less about Asperger's Disorder.

Justtess
04-01-11, 04:21 AM
I just read an article from the National Resource Center for AD/HD and the difference between AD/HD and Asperger. I colored the Asperger traits in blue and ADHD traits in bold


...However, they also have difficulty with the subtleties of language, such as humor, irony, or metaphors. They have a trouble with the give-and-take of a conversation and trouble with turn-taking between friends or in a group. Like children affected by ADHD, they display attention difficulties but those are more related to a need for rules and routines to be followed than to a perceived overload of stimuli. By comparison, a child with ADHD has difficulties with attention due to impulsivity, novelty and, for some, hyperactivity.

A child affected by Aspergerís tends to focus all of her attention on one task or activity. A child affected by ADHD normally has her attention drawn away from a task or activity by trivial stimuli in her environment, such as another child coughing or a bird flying by the window. While the child with Aspergerís remains focused to the exclusion of other events, the child with ADHD is more likely to be distracted by her environment and may quickly jump among activities or behaviors.

Another difference between the expressions of the two disorders is a child affected by Aspergerís generally does not show a wide range of emotion, while the child affected by ADHD may have difficulty controlling his emotions and move very quickly among emotional states. Children affected by Aspergerís have difficulty making or maintaining eye contact. For this reason, they may appear to not be listening to adults when they actually are. A child affected by ADHD is not listening because he is focusing on other things, environmental stimuli or even his own thoughts. Another area of significant difference is the understanding that other people have separate thoughts, emotions, wants, and needs than the child does. This is called social reciprocity. A child with Aspergerís lacks this understanding of social reciprocity, while the child with ADHD in most instances grasps the understanding.

Both ADHD and Aspergerís Disorder are typically not diagnosed before middle-childhood (i.e. not before the age of six or seven, though possibly later). Parents who are concerned that their child shows any of these symptoms need to discuss these concerns with their childís health care provider and seek a thorough evaluation. For both disorders early treatment is key to future success in life. The majority of children identified with either disorder and who receive proper treatment, grow up to be happy and successful adults.


I see more of the Asperger traits in my son but I believe he has ADHD also.

Lunacie
04-01-11, 10:34 AM
Hmm, I thought ADHDers also tended to have trouble with turn-taking, generally because of impulsivity rather than not understanding the concept itself.

And I thought ADHDers also tended to get so focused on something they really enjoy that the house could practically burn down around them before they noticed the smell of smoke. I'm sure they're more easily distracted more of the time, but there are times when they are very focused.

I do agree that those with Asperger's or Autism have a harder time showing their emotions properly, while ADHDers have a hard time regulating their emotions - everything seems just as important on an emotional scale so they seem to over-react to things.

But I've read so many posts by those diagnosed with ADHD who say they also have trouble with constant eye contact that the line there surely gets more blurry than the article suggests?

---

I know that ADHD is often cormorbid with Autism Spectrum Disorder so I watch my granddaughter for clues since both her sister and I have ADHD. But times like this morning when she is telling me about a radio podcast and remembering exactly what station it is on - I know I'd be much more likely to say "Hey I was listening to this really great podcast but I can't remember where I heard it - anyway here's what they were saying..."

Or like yesterday when I was dropping off the script for my ADHD granddaughter's Adderall and the clerk asked for her birthdate - and I gave her my anniversary. My granddaughter was born 4 days after my anniversary, common sort of mixup for me.

corbykins
04-01-11, 10:47 AM
I was diagnosed ADD and Aspergers. as far as i understand it the line between the two is very blurry, i have done tons of research online through various websites read the DSM VI criteria for both and read many forums and talked with many people who have both ADD/ADHD and or AS. i dont see much need for a diagnosis unless its very severe so that you cannot function at all in daily life cause theres not much that can be done. basically just talk therapy or something of that nature. and ADHD/depression/anxiety medications as those also tend to come along with the AS or are caused by it.

hope this helps feel free to ask me questions :)

Offle
04-01-11, 10:55 AM
I agree with Lunacie, a lot of those traits seem to apply to both people with ADHD and people with Aspergers.

A lot of ADHD people have trouble with the give and take of conversation. The are impulsive and blurt things out without thinking about it. That's even on of the criteria on the ADHD questionnaire test thing. Someone with ADHD is more likely to blurt out an answer in class, interrupt someone in he mild of a sentence, or butt into conversations they weren't even involved in.

Plenty of ADHDers on here have spoken about having trouble maintaining eye contact during a conversation because they keep looking at other things. In my ADHD class most of the kids make eye contact for about two-seconds before their eyes start darting around looking at things around the room, even while they're talking to you.

Many people here have also spoken about being able to focus for long periods of time on something that interests them. Sometimes it can be almost impossible to drag them away from it. It's usually referred to as Hyperfocus.

fracturedstory
04-02-11, 07:19 AM
People with autism don't make eye contact because it is uncomfortable, not because they are distracted. Eye contact is a very social thing and looking at someone in the eye doesn't occur to them. I still don't look at eyes until I remember to do so. It's not natural for me to look into eyes.

I'm not sure if the blurting thing out in ADHD has to do with ignorance about what is appropriate to say or it is an impulsive thing. The former would be autism.

Autism 'hyperfocus' can last weeks/months/years and the subject will be the only thing they talk about. It completely takes over their life.

There are similarities but you can see the differences unless you have them both. In that case you will constantly debate whether you have one or the other and not find peace by just accepting that you have them both.

Justtess
04-02-11, 07:48 AM
People with autism don't make eye contact because it is uncomfortable, not because they are distracted. Eye contact is a very social thing and looking at someone in the eye doesn't occur to them. I still don't look at eyes until I remember to do so. It's not natural for me to look into eyes.

I'm not sure if the blurting thing out in ADHD has to do with ignorance about what is appropriate to say or it is an impulsive thing. The former would be autism.

Autism 'hyperfocus' can last weeks/months/years and the subject will be the only thing they talk about. It completely takes over their life.

There are similarities but you can see the differences unless you have them both. In that case you will constantly debate whether you have one or the other and not find peace by just accepting that you have them both.

that is what I was trying to gather. Thanks. The motivation behind the behavior is different. The article explained to me when a person wants to do a task.... ADHD will distract from accomplishing it while with asperger, the task will get done but perhaps the person forgot to eat, turn off the alarm (clock), or hear the knock at the door.

Also, with eye contact... I suspect with ADHD the distractability of maintaining eye focus would be similar to the way a dog can't resist looking at the squirrel darting by while with asperger, it is more of an uncomfortable feeling of sensory overload.

While I suspect my son has both, it makes sense why he feels unjustly accused of misbehaving when it could be one or the other when someone tries to redirects him. It seems to work if someone tells him the end result and he figures out how he gets there.