ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community

ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community (http://www.addforums.com/forums/index.php)
-   General ADD Talk (http://www.addforums.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=13)
-   -   Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts? (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=185062)

aur462 04-20-17 05:06 PM

Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
The thesis here is that from my observation, particularly with myself, and otherwise anecdotally from those having/seeming to have ADHD, that many have unique personalities.

From my earliest memories of "ego" type thinking (early elementary?), I remember thinking that most people seemed to be followers (or vaguely similar) and I took pride in being different and probably went out of my way to foster this inclination. I say strange stuff, have an offbeat sense of humor and at times am overbearingly prideful in my "being special with a capital 'R' "; though this is usually exaggerated around my wife who witnesses my most random idiosyncrasies.

I am pretty new to identifying myself more definitely as ADHD-PI. I'm discovering crossover, ostensibly, between my anxiety problems and secondary depression and lifetime underachievement - currently engineering change

I've come across others who I believe have ADHD, with a unique style of speaking and thinking to one extent or another. A particular guy I know on Facebook writes posts that seem encrypted sometimes they're so odd, but it just seems that's how he expresses himself. A childhood friend who articulates in intelligent but esoteric fashion. I came across a guy with bipolar "3" and ADD-PI (on another forum) who's writing style made me feel as if we were kindred spirits; this was unique for me, as I've never come across someone who reminded me of myself.

My wife claims she has "combined" ADHD, but I would lovingly refer to her personality, at least in the realm of "outside the box" traits, as being rather mundane. She also did very well in school, living on a university campus during high school junior and senior year, earning college and High school credit. She does have the ADHD traits, but her ability to circumvent the ATTENTION DEFICIT aspect and highly achieve academically always seemed counterintuitive and suspicious to her diagnosis. She's had 1 shrink and a neurologist confirm this (anomalous?). She said she could tell a big difference when she started Adderall - ? I bet you did.

So I know there are some "straight-forward" personalities out there, including my wife, in the ADHD "community" but...What about y'all. Are you weird? Offbeat? Particularly creative? anxious/other psychiatric inconveniences? One of a kind? Underachieving (you were almost certainly blessed with this).

Fuzzy12 04-20-17 07:16 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
I always wanted to be so is vital if I was (more special.than others) I really can't judge. Ironically now I want nothing more than to be normal.

I've often been told that I'm rather weird. I talk walk and think weirdly apparently. Even my sense of humour is apparently weird.

I don't know if I'm creative. I have good ideas I think but rarely manage to implement them.

Definitely underachieving. Slight anxiety and recurrent depression.

sarahsweets 04-21-17 04:33 AM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by aur462 (Post 1943636)
My wife claims she has "combined" ADHD, but I would lovingly refer to her personality, at least in the realm of "outside the box" traits, as being rather mundane. She also did very well in school, living on a university campus during high school junior and senior year, earning college and High school credit. She does have the ADHD traits, but her ability to circumvent the ATTENTION DEFICIT aspect and highly achieve academically always seemed counterintuitive and suspicious to her diagnosis. She's had 1 shrink and a neurologist confirm this (anomalous?). She said she could tell a big difference when she started Adderall - ? I bet you did.

I think being combined gets a really bad wrap. its like being the misfit. People tend to think we "have the best of both worlds" in the adhd population. Like the hyperactivity makes us social butterflies and do well with school and friends and the inattention gets ignored because sometimes our achievments overshadow our difficulties. Forget about the impulsivity. That part usually gets dismissed because for some, it doesnt manifest as shocking enough, or "out there" enough to even be considered. And I dont mean this to you, or even people here, but sometimes there are sort of snooty people who think that being combined isnt real, or cant be actual trouble and that only people who have difficulty concentrating have real problems. Even though the DSM doesnt use the term 'combined' anymore- i still think it exists.

Quote:

So I know there are some "straight-forward" personalities out there, including my wife, in the ADHD "community" but...What about y'all. Are you weird? Offbeat? Particularly creative? anxious/other psychiatric inconveniences? One of a kind? Underachieving (you were almost certainly blessed with this).
Again, this isnt directed at you or your beliefs but I also think that the ideas of being "quirky,unique,out-of-the-box-thinkers,and creative are just nice ways of making ourselves superior to each other, and other types of adhd'rs and other mental disorders. Its much nicer to say those things when comparing how we deal with the non-adhd folk, then it is to embrace the pain behind it. I hope your wife is validated, because I can tell you that feeling like a "run-of-the-mill" adhd person can be just as alienating.

hla8302 04-22-17 12:18 AM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by aur462 (Post 1943636)
My wife claims she has "combined" ADHD, but I would lovingly refer to her personality, at least in the realm of "outside the box" traits, as being rather mundane. She also did very well in school, living on a university campus during high school junior and senior year, earning college and High school credit. She does have the ADHD traits, but her ability to circumvent the ATTENTION DEFICIT aspect and highly achieve academically always seemed counterintuitive and suspicious to her diagnosis. She's had 1 shrink and a neurologist confirm this (anomalous?). She said she could tell a big difference when she started Adderall - ? I bet you did.

Its actually wrong to say I'm "rather mundane". In fact, I have a rather unique, empathetic personality that rivals my peers (RNs). Yes, I have been diagnosed with ADHD, and I have been diagnosed by more than one psychiatrist (3, in fact). My first interest in treating any issues I had related to impulsivity. As it turned out, I had also returned to college to get my SECOND Bachelors degree and I could suddenly concentrate enough to rely on more than just mere intellect to get me through. In fact, I told my mom I should have been treated all my life because it was like a lightbulb had switched on and I could think in one straight line. And, after shyness (or an attempt at invisibility), I became more outgoing and quite enjoyed the company of others.

I have many interesting and unique traits. I am excellent at making mathematical correlations in a series of numbers (like a birthday). I write very intense poetry. I love to talk to and hear about other people's lives. And if you ask me to look at a wound or want to talk about your symptoms because I'm a nurse, hey, I'm game (especially the wounds). Yes, I do have inattentive and hyperactive attention deficit disorder. Treated, I'm great. Not treated, I can't concentrate and I'll pick at the cuticles and skin around all of my fingernails. One psychiatrist walked into the room, looked at me and said, "You have ADHD". So despite my intelligence and ability to succeed prior to being treated for ADHD, I have it and I'm quirky as f***, thank you.

aur462 04-22-17 03:27 AM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Yes shnookums, you have plenty of uniqueness and I'm lucky to have a partner as empathetic as you are. And she is a gifted poet, indeed.

Also, I hope my description of "mundane" personalities doesn't sound cavalier; not my intent. Hope I didn't offend anyone.

Thanks for the replies. Learning more about ADD has benefited me significantly in understanding myself. Not understanding why I think the way I do and little insight from "professionals" have made self-improvement impossible at times. Sites like this one are informative beyond the "scientific papers"

ginniebean 04-23-17 09:17 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
I'd say your attraction to certain types or admiration for them is more a matter of personality than adhd. If I had to guess I'd say enneagram type 4.


Adhd doesn't really make us all that unique unless we consider ourselves uniquely impaired to get $%## done. Or uniquely disorganized.

WheresMyMind 04-24-17 12:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aur462 (Post 1943636)
The thesis here is that from my observation, particularly with myself, and otherwise anecdotally from those having/seeming to have ADHD, that many have unique personalities.

From my earliest memories of "ego" type thinking (early elementary?), I remember thinking that most people seemed to be followers (or vaguely similar) and I took pride in being different and probably went out of my way to foster this inclination. I say strange stuff, have an offbeat sense of humor and at times am overbearingly prideful in my "being special with a capital 'R' "; though this is usually exaggerated around my wife who witnesses my most random idiosyncrasies.

I am pretty new to identifying myself more definitely as ADHD-PI. I'm discovering crossover, ostensibly, between my anxiety problems and secondary depression and lifetime underachievement - currently engineering change

I've come across others who I believe have ADHD, with a unique style of speaking and thinking to one extent or another. A particular guy I know on Facebook writes posts that seem encrypted sometimes they're so odd, but it just seems that's how he expresses himself. A childhood friend who articulates in intelligent but esoteric fashion. I came across a guy with bipolar "3" and ADD-PI (on another forum) who's writing style made me feel as if we were kindred spirits; this was unique for me, as I've never come across someone who reminded me of myself.

My wife claims she has "combined" ADHD, but I would lovingly refer to her personality, at least in the realm of "outside the box" traits, as being rather mundane. She also did very well in school, living on a university campus during high school junior and senior year, earning college and High school credit. She does have the ADHD traits, but her ability to circumvent the ATTENTION DEFICIT aspect and highly achieve academically always seemed counterintuitive and suspicious to her diagnosis. She's had 1 shrink and a neurologist confirm this (anomalous?). She said she could tell a big difference when she started Adderall - ? I bet you did.

So I know there are some "straight-forward" personalities out there, including my wife, in the ADHD "community" but...What about y'all. Are you weird? Offbeat? Particularly creative? anxious/other psychiatric inconveniences? One of a kind? Underachieving (you were almost certainly blessed with this).


No.


And I have never met a straightforward personality. Except for a very few incredibly self-absorbed, and therefore very predictable people.

aur462 04-24-17 02:20 AM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Admittedly, there's more I'm ignorant of than knowledgeable when it comes to nuances of ADD.

Incidentally, I found the inattentive board's "common traits" thread insightful on connections I'd never considered.

Letching Gray 04-24-17 08:36 AM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
I feel like a fat slob

aur462 04-24-17 03:59 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Letching Gray (Post 1944112)
I feel like a fat slob

Cheers. I've felt particularly ineffectual circa last 2 months owed to some idiopathic (presently) medical/mental crap that's just gotten worse the last 2 months. Concerned and miserable at times. This is all what makes life such an adventure.

Lunacie 04-24-17 04:56 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
From the DSM-V:
Quote:

Based on the types of symptoms, three kinds (presentations) of ADHD can occur:

Combined Presentation: if enough symptoms of both criteria inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity were present for the past 6 months

Predominantly Inattentive Presentation: if enough symptoms of inattention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, were present for the past six months

Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Presentation: if enough symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity but not inattention were present for the past six months.

Because symptoms can change over time, the presentation may change over time as well.
If your wife has had two doctors diagnose her with combined type ADHD, she
has every right to claim that she has it. Only another doctor has the qualifica-
tions to dispute the diagnosis.

Did I feel unique/different? Sure did, and not in a good way. Always felt like
the odd one out, and that was confirmed by feedback from teachers who said
I wasn't "working up to my potential." And by a mother who would re-do
things I had done as they weren't good enough ... or weren't done her way
although I couldn't figure out what I was doing "wrong."

ADHD doesn't make anyone less intelligent, just like any demographic there
are some who are geniuses and some who ... are not. With support and
encouragement one with any smarts can certainly manage to go to college.
I didn't have that support or encouragement, and I had comorbid anxiety and
sensory processing disorder which made college life unthinkable.

I've spent most of my life having other people dismiss my issues as hysteria
until my grandkids were diagnosed and these issues were given a diagnosis.
Friends and family thought I was being manipulative because I didn't "like"
scented products ... wish I could tell them how I ended up in the emergency
room last year with a very serious reaction to someone's perfume, my blood
pressure dropped to 77/55 and then rebounded to 200/140 ... stroke level.

So I'm probably over-sensitive (another accusation from my younger days)
to the attitude I'm reading between the lines of your post about the validity
of your wife's diagnosis. But I am biting my tongue and trying to remain in
the guidelines of the forum.

Cyllya 04-24-17 05:25 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
I feel pretty unique/weird/special, but I don't have any reason to believe I'm actually all that unusual.

I DO have an unusual set of strengths and weaknesses.

There are a couple traits I have that are apparently weird in combination (albeit totally common individually) because, not only have i never seen in anyone else, but sometimes othere people are baffled or disbelieving to find that out about me. However, that doesn't seem ADHD-related.

Certain personality traits are less noticeable than others. If you have those traits, you might feel more alone than you are.

I notice a lot of people associate ADHD with their ENTIRE personality, so they think everything about them is an ADHD trait. Sometimes, these people wouldn't even want to be cured if it were possible because they feel like they'd lose all of their identity and positive traits too. I can't sympathize with that viewpoint personally.

As with other mental or neurological disorders, your symptoms could give a different results on a personality tests. On a "big 5" test, inattentive symptoms will likely give you less "conscientious" points and impulsivity symptoms might give you more "extraversion" points (big 5 associates being energetic with being extroverted). On MBTI and similar, inattentive may give more "P" points.

Greyhound1 04-24-17 09:01 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
I just feel weird, different and more sensitive to everything than my non-ADHD counterparts.

aur462 04-24-17 10:45 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Greyhound1 (Post 1944216)
I just feel weird, different and more sensitive to everything than my non-ADHD counterparts.

This makes sense. I've had some element of this also.

My brother in law is a jerk, and while a very smart guy, he has a VERY strong pension to be very industrious at my in laws to begin tile (unfinished), stairs (begging for handrails for months), plus porch stairs in the front awaiting completion. He's untreated, successful and likely has "combined". He's arrogant and disrespectful of his sister and is someone that I would at least LIKE to punch..hard. He underscores how different we all are, regardless of any given diagnosis.

I'm not a fan of thinking everything falls neatly into a container (I often hate the implication), however I find the "leaky filter theory" interesting but understand CLEARLY this is not remotely universal.

My "filter", I'm sure, could be implicated, perhaps, from everything to creativity and anxiety. These articles are interesting viewed as a subset of add folks rather than a testament to their universality.

The Creative Gifts of ADHD by Scott Barry Kaufman in Scientific American

Are People with ADHD More Creative? by Kenny Handelman

http://disinfo.com/2014/11/creative-gifts-adhd/

Attention Deficit Disorder is Actually Correlated with Creativity and Achievement from Washington's Blog

FlipperTheWhale 04-24-17 11:54 PM

Re: Do you feel especially unique and distinguished from your nonADHD counterparts?
 
Read the question wrong...


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums