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-   -   Newly Diagnosed - Thanks for the previous help. (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20582)

rustifer123 08-25-05 10:51 AM

Newly Diagnosed - Thanks for the previous help.
 
Just got back from doc appt. He said he was initially hesitant to prescribe based on my past alcohol history. That and he said I had some bipolar traits that are borderline. However, based on the positive effect Ritalin has on me and my history, he was fairly comfortable with an ADD diagnosis. He took me at face value and prescribed it.

Whew Hew! I just about cried. Finally, one less thing to worry about...the squirrels in my head.

Thanks for all the help as I posted a thread earlier this week and got some good feedback.

He is asking for someone from AA to meet with him and give him a warm fuzzy feeling as I could sense a bit of apprehension due to my past.

RC

andiemedic 08-25-05 11:01 AM

Thats great RC, glad to hear it!

brandilyn 08-25-05 11:16 AM

Good for you!!Im truly happy for you.

meadd823 08-25-05 11:54 PM

Yea........glad to hear your appointment went well!!!!!!

mctavish23 08-26-05 11:23 AM

There's an important chapter in the NA big book entitled " More Will Be Revealed."

It deals with medication issues for addicts. Personally, I believe NA understands addicts better than AA, even tho it's the same 12 Steps.

What that chapter says in effect is that if an addict has a legitimate medical condition that is being treated by an informed physician, then taking that medication is okay.

If the addict is concerned about abusing the meds then some safeguards could be put in place if needed.That would be who controlled the meds (spouse, family, etc., or locking them up).

The other thing that the chapter goes into is taking the lowest dose possible to adequately treat the condition.

In the case of ADHD, the meds may need to be increased over time. This is where my doing a written 10th Step (daily inventory) really helps me. I journal about my day and recovery and I try to be totally honest about my feelings.

I share concerns with my wife and my sponsor on a regular basis as well.

I wish you luck in Recovery and in treating your ADHD. I hope that whatever med you take works for you and that you can still keep your Recovery balanced on a "one day at a time" basis.

timh 08-26-05 12:49 PM

Congrats on the diagnosis. It must feel like a huge weight was lifted from you shoulders. Work closely with your doctor and you will do just fine.

I have read that even if people have abused substances, once they get formally diagnosed with ADHD and choose stimulants they are less likely to abuse the medication. They still need to be cautious. All along these people were just trying to compensate for their unknown ADHD symptoms.

Good luck with your recovery and treatment. Now you will really start to feel the positive aspects of ADHD. Keep us updated.

foggyfroggy 08-27-05 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by timh
Congrats on the diagnosis. It must feel like a huge weight was lifted from you shoulders. Work closely with your doctor and you will do just fine.

I have read that even if people have abused substances, once they get formally diagnosed with ADHD and choose stimulants they are less likely to abuse the medication. They still need to be cautious. All along these people were just trying to compensate for their unknown ADHD symptoms.

RC,

Ditto on what Tim said...

I have an "alcohol history", too. Started self-medicating right out of high school. Thirty-four years later, I'm finally beginning to understand some of the challenges I was faced with all of those years--which just felt like "my life--take it or leave it".

In July of 2002, my Mom became seriously ill and I spent over a month camping out with her--24 hours a day--in the hospital. When she was finally released to go home, I started staying with her there, too.

After almost two weeks at home, she suffered a severe stroke and was taken to the ER. I spent the next three days with her, as she lay in a coma in intensive care. On the fourth day, I had to make a decision I never dreamed I would have to make. As a result, she was taken off of life support. I had my arms around her, and my cheek pressed to hers, as her life slipped away.

My life--and my perspective on life--changed in an instant. After I realized I was going to survive Mom's death, nothing else has seemed quite as hard to deal with as it was before.

I went through 6 months of counselling, and participated in a bereavement support group for two months. The bereavement support group experience opened my eyes to a part of me I had always "felt", but never understood--the exquisite pain of my own compassion. It was an epiphany.

It feels strange to say, but at the moment I realized that so much of the pain I had felt, even as a child, was compassion--and not just pain to be avoided, or to run away from--my life changed; because, of all things, compassion is really what life is about.

Suddenly, it became very important for me to (really) know how I felt about what was going on in my life--inside and out. At that time, I knew in my heart that I would never really know how I felt about anything as long as I continued to rely on alcohol as an escape mechanism.

Three and a half months after my Mom died, I quit drinking (after 30 years). It wasn't easy at first; but I was surprised by a very clear self-awareness...that, finally, the pain caused by my drinking was greater than the pain of making it through one day at time without a drink. I was motivated!

Finally, there were things about life--and myself--that I needed to know; and nothing was more important to me than learning how to be a participant in my own life, rather than the victim I had always been.

In April, after eleven years of working with me through alcohol addiction, depression and now, menopause(!!!)...my doctor diagnosed me with ADD. We both shared concern about putting me on Adderall, her med of choice for me. But, after talking about it, she started me out on a very low dose (5 mg. twice a day) to see how I would do.

Adderall had just the opposite effect from what I had feared...it quieted the noise in my head and calmed me down. Wow! What a difference.

Five months later I'm still working closely with my doctor to get the dosage and timing just right for the Adderall (now taking 10 mg XR twice a day--first thing in the morning, then four hours later). I have my ups and downs--and it does take time...and patience! :) --but I definitely feel like I'm headed in the right direction now.

McT mentioned something very important...about keeping your recovery balanced on a "one day at a time" basis. The longest journey begins with a single step...and goes on...one step at time.

Never give up on yourself! And remember--let others help you when they can, and when it works for you; it makes them feel good, and is a refreshing reminder that you don't have to go it alone.

Who knows...? You may even discover that some of those pesky squirrels in your head are best friends, in disguise... :)

Best wishes!
Deb

mctavish23 08-28-05 09:50 AM

If you get a chance, please go to the Adderall Section (under Adderall Omg) and look for my post of 7/4/05 @12:19pm.

It's a synopsis of 3 studies covering a 13 year span by some of the most respected researchers in the field. All 3 of those confirm that the use of stimulants by a person with ADHD, actually reduces the chance of a Substance Use Disoder.

scuro 08-28-05 12:29 PM

It's a good feeling when "the ship is righted". I'm glad for you.


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