ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community

ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community (http://www.addforums.com/forums/index.php)
-   General ADD Talk (http://www.addforums.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=13)
-   -   Is brain fog the opposite of adhd? (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=195218)

drlizard 08-29-19 02:04 PM

Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
I find myself often between the two extremes of thinking too much or finding it too tiring to think.

Drogheda98 08-29-19 04:56 PM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
I offer my take on overthinking, I could be wrong though.

overthinking is where anybody has an over controlling mother, father, spouse, or other significant person in their life

the word play is, over controlling
over thinking. "the thing about overthinking is it get's in the way of behavior", quoting the therapist I go to.

I find that meditation helps overthinking, sense we have adhd and can hyperfocus pretty east, or I can atleast, overthinking can create a feedback loop of overthinking and rumination isn't fun, which is, now that I think about it, what rumination is, just overthinking on steroids so to speak.

meditation, it's centered on the body, thinking about one part of the body, foot, hand, or just simply breathing, and then when a thought pops into my to say to oneself "it's just a thought" and think about foot, hand or breathing again. I believe mindfulness does the same. I know when I meditate for 20 minutes or so my mind is clear and I can focus on the behaviors I want to focus on, something you could try as well

mrzyphl 08-29-19 10:41 PM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
I think brain fog is everything ADHD. Like when someone is talking to you and
you're hearing something completely different than what they're trying to
communicate. Or like when you're thinking about mowing the lawn then have
one thought after another and end up completely forget about the lawn.
Or when you're sitting quietly and someone asks what you're thinking about
and you realize you're mind is completely blank. Or when you make a
comment in a group conversation and someone gives you a queer look and
says "we finished talking about that 5 minutes ago?"

Kunga Dorji 08-30-19 05:14 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Everybody's experience in this area is subjective- so it is very hard to be sure that your brain fog is the same as mine.
This is especially so as brain fog is a term widely used in other conditions- CFS, Fibromyalgia, depression etc

To my way of thinking brain fog is more like a vagueness or dullness.
Overthinking is not the same as brain fog, and it also needs to be discriminated from wandering attention/ intrusive thoughts.

mrzyphl 08-31-19 07:24 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kunga Dorji (Post 2020251)
Everybody's experience in this area is subjective- so it is very hard to be sure that your brain fog is the same as mine.
This is especially so as brain fog is a term widely used in other conditions- CFS, Fibromyalgia, depression etc

To my way of thinking brain fog is more like a vagueness or dullness.
Overthinking is not the same as brain fog, and it also needs to be discriminated from wandering attention/ intrusive thoughts.

You're right. Brain fog has a narrower definition in clinical terms. I'm not
intellectual enough to separately classify every condition/behavior. To me
the fog is a barrier to to focusing and thinking clearly. I may not be correct
but it makes it easier for me to think of it in simpler terms. Also I agree about overthinking.
It's more anxiety related than adhd.

Dandan9 12-23-19 06:30 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
maybe the truth is somewhere in between, it’s necessary to balance it

Lunacie 12-23-19 11:39 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
I think it's related to focus.
At times we can't select just one thing to think about, so brain fog.

While other times we overthink one or two related things, so hyperfocus
and can't seem to switch our focus off of those things.

mildadhd 12-23-19 04:53 PM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drlizard (Post 2020228)
I find myself often between the two extremes of thinking too much or finding it too tiring to think.

When I feel "brain fog" (inattentive) I think it is a symptom of having a AD(H)D.

(Although when a person feels "brain fog", could also be a symptom of other medical conditions, like hypothyroidism, diabetes, etc.)


The overthinking and underthinking both represent a lack of control.

Lack of control of thoughts could be due to feeling tired.

Lack of control of thoughts could also be due to feelings related to having a AD(H)D.


In the context of this thread discussion, I do not feel "brain fog" is the opposite of a AD(H)D.









m





.

Kunga Dorji 12-24-19 05:01 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drlizard (Post 2020228)
I find myself often between the two extremes of thinking too much or finding it too tiring to think.


It is possible that "thinking too much" is the first sign of brain fatigue- ie failure to inhibit bulldust.
If you are thinking too much can you write it down and capture it in a useful way? If not it may be pathological.

I do wonder though, whether the term "brain fog" is used very differently by different patient groups (CFS vs ADHD).


I have never seen a sensible medical discussion based on defining what brain fog is and how we should differentiate it from other conditions.

Simple hypoxia-- would that produce brain fog?

An interesting example- I have long been aware that I just don't see stuff, or if I do I dont integrate it properly into a game plan of what needs to be done.

I had something of a breakthrough with my neck issues and excitedly told my chiropractor how much my visual clarity had improved with the latest work. We then referenced a book showing huge improvements in perception and drawing ability following neck mobilisation in children and I realised that my day to day existence had been limited by this very subtle sort of cloud that consisted of just not seeing things.

Effectively, might that be described as a sort of brain fog? It was certainly having very negative effects, as my partner has not been happy with the mess I leave.

Lunacie 12-24-19 01:35 PM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kunga Dorji (Post 2022395)
It is possible that "thinking too much" is the first sign of brain fatigue- ie failure to inhibit bulldust.


.

I'd say there's a strong possibility that over-thinking can lead to brain fatigue
with resulting brain fog.

Kunga Dorji 12-28-19 12:33 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Over thinking can certainly waste a lot of time and energy, leading to demoralisation and dysfunction.
I find it important to have an algorithm that forces me to think systematically about a problem and to commit to a decision tree.

When you think about it, thinking about a problem, especially an interpersonal one, is usually done in your head and involves lots of going round in circles.

It is easier to run a hypothesis and a projected theory about what you should do.
- but do it in stages.
Hypothesis 1, planned solution 1---- did the plan work, or not? ---> Hypothesis 2
With luck, you should be able to triangulate i on a workable truth without too many steps.

The big danger with ADHD for me has always been getting involved in endless loops of unfruitful thinking where I never finish one line of thought without it getting interrupted by something else.

This can be beaten, even with ADHD.

Monox D. I-Fly 12-28-19 03:05 AM

Re: Is brain fog the opposite of adhd?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Drogheda98 (Post 2020233)
I find that meditation helps overthinking, sense we have adhd and can hyperfocus pretty east, or I can atleast, overthinking can create a feedback loop of overthinking and rumination isn't fun, which is, now that I think about it, what rumination is, just overthinking on steroids so to speak.

Funny, rumination is how I sleep whenever I'm depressed. If I have difficulty going to sleep, I'll just exhaust my brain thinking my problems until I fall asleep.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:00 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums