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Lloyd_ 05-16-17 06:15 PM

I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I hate you people who say ADD is some personality 'quirk' that really makes us unique blah blah blah. I have more respect for those that have beaten me down for being a dunce more than I do for the people who are self delusional about being learning disabled. The way I see myself is being brain damaged and that's exactly what I am, having to work 2x as hard as the average person to just barely keep up? That's not some super cool attribute, that's being handicapped to one degree mentally.

Most the time and it's been this way for almost as long as I can remember even as a kid not wanting to be this way and really look forward to the day I finally leave this mortal coil. Maybe one day thanks to modern science my brain can become fully functional as an average person and at least get to enjoy what's left of my life.

Fuzzy12 05-16-17 07:19 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
No, it's not super cool. It sucks.:(

Greyhound1 05-16-17 07:26 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Don't hate people because they say that. Feel sorry for them and their lack of knowledge or experience instead. :)

ginniebean 05-16-17 09:43 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Everyone is impaired differently and for some of us the consequences are debilitating. There are a lot of people on this forum who are doing very well and often it xan seem they speak for adhd when they are the minority.

Adhd is a disability, some more, some less. instead of having such animus towards others maybe consider that your voice with your experience is vital. Because so much of our disorder is labeled as moral failing that can get bought into and internalized.

Due to this internalization there is a lot of shame involved with being symptomatic and how that plays out in real time. Being willing to be vulnerable to give voice to these struggles, to have the courage it takes to stare down the moral attribution and to stand up for accomadation in our personal lives. (because that is where it needs to start.) is a healthy act of self growth. Self discovery of a self with adhd takes a very long time. Make the journey.

Speak out for yourself and others.

Traveler5 05-16-17 09:52 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lloyd_ (Post 1947796)
I hate you people who say ADD is some personality 'quirk' that really makes us unique blah blah blah.

I agree. I hate statements like that too. I certainly don't believe ADHD is our greatest strength. That's bull pucky.

ADHD does suck and makes life hard for us. Fortunately, it can be treated with the right kind of medication and mindfulness.

Lloyd_ 05-16-17 10:03 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginniebean (Post 1947829)
Due to this internalization there is a lot of shame involved with being symptomatic and how that plays out in real time. Being willing to be vulnerable to give voice to these struggles, to have the courage it takes to stare down the moral attribution and to stand up for accomadation in our personal lives. (because that is where it needs to start.)


I am vocal at work and will state that I learn and process differently than others which only results in more resentment but out of spite I stick around, the anger keeps me going.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ginniebean (Post 1947829)
Speak out for yourself and others.

I speak out for others more than I do myself and in this point in my life it is unlikely I'll ever accept a compliment of any sorts or learn to truly live with myself, thought earlier in life that I'd get to that point but I haven't yet and don't believe at this point I ever will.

dvdnvwls 05-16-17 10:38 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
You already are living with yourself. That doesn't mean it always has to be the ideal perfect relationship, but being unkind to yourself is a pretty poor strategy.

Anger is like a grenade. A defective grenade, that explodes while you're still pulling out the pin. It may get them, but it gets you more.

Black_Rose1809 05-17-17 02:55 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I know it's hard. I'm ADHD-I and it's hard. I had to work hard to get where I am, and for the longest time I thought my disability was who I was 100% of the time, but now I don't let it define me. Yes I have issues with this, but I have to do what I can with it. I learned to be like water and adjust myself to what I have and stop fighting it.

mildadhd 05-17-17 09:15 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lloyd_ (Post 1947796)
I hate you people who say ADD is some personality 'quirk' that really makes us unique blah blah blah. I have more respect for those that have beaten me down for being a dunce more than I do for the people who are self delusional about being learning disabled. The way I see myself is being brain damaged and that's exactly what I am, having to work 2x as hard as the average person to just barely keep up? That's not some super cool attribute, that's being handicapped to one degree mentally.

Most the time and it's been this way for almost as long as I can remember even as a kid not wanting to be this way and really look forward to the day I finally leave this mortal coil. Maybe one day thanks to modern science my brain can become fully functional as an average person and at least get to enjoy what's left of my life.

I understand your frustration, ADHD is no gift.

If I could regift my deficits of self regulation, I certainly would.

That being said, I think there are benefits to humans being born with more sensitive temperaments.

But not many people are interested in discussing and learning about our inherited hypersensitive temperaments and how self regulation develops in early life.

Many people prefer to think we are born with AD(H)D, but nobody is born with self-regulation.

Self regulation develops after birth.

What we are born with are more sensitive temperaments.


m

psychopathetic 05-17-17 09:38 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Is it possible at all that for them...their own add truly is a gift or gives them great strength or whatever?

I view ADHD like I view most mental health disorders...it's on a spectrum. On the far left of the spectrum is total disability...where it interferes in many aspects of your life in ways that make it nearly impossible to live a 'normal' or productive life.
On the far right side of spectrum...is just the opposite.
There's MANY shades of gray in between the 2 extremes, and we can shift around along the spectrum from moment to moment.

So while someone with ADHD is having a real rough go of things and is pretty far into the left side of the disorder...it's possible another person who's found an amazing career that flips all the right switches in his brain and gets his inner fire going and really loves his life...
While both have ADHD.

I view MY ADD as an absolute disability in my life.
But I'm open to the idea that not everyone has had the same experiences as I've had. Been down the same paths.

I don't hate people that 'love' their ADHD or whatever. I envy them.

As long as they're not preaching about EVERYONE with ADHD should love it and think of it as a gift...I see no reason to hate them.
But maybe you're talking about those that do think that ADHD is an amazing thing for EVERYONE to have...that those of us who don't see the brighter things of it just need to get over ourselves...
Well yeah...then those people can go shove it! lol >.<'

sarahsweets 05-18-17 01:19 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I dont hate-but I am capable of disliking strongly.

DJ Bill 05-18-17 10:36 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I know the feeling Lloyd. If I see another article about the of extremely successful ADD-ers, I may have to say a few words about their semblance to a posterior part. The percentage of ADDers like Richard Branson of Virgin Air is pretty dang small. It's sorta like telling a kid who's learning how to play basketball that he should be like magic johnson.

Johnny Slick 05-18-17 12:21 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Yeah, the real danger in this is the people who take the "hey, here are successful people with ADHD" or "hey, ADHD can help you to do X" to mean "it's not really that bad". It can be crippling to some and devastating to others. And sure, adversity makes us stronger, but do you know what else makes us stronger? Not having adversity. I mean, there are all kinds of places you can derive adversity from that have zip to do with ADHD: you have to fight some battles others don't have to fight if you're a woman, or not a cis white male, or even if you are the latter perhaps you grew up poor or have dyslexia or were in an emotionally abusive household, for example. The possibilities for adversity are, shall we say, endless, and we don't *need* additional bits and pieces thrown on top of us.

It's not even like telling a kid to play basketball like Magic Johnson. It's like telling a kid who is 5'3" that Muggsy Bogues played in the NBA at his height so he's got nothing to complain about. Muggsy Bogues also put in an *insane* amount of work learning ball-handling and court awareness in order to play professional basketball *in spite* of his stature, not because his stature gave him extra added abilities or something.

Cyllya 05-20-17 08:12 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I feel ya.

Quote:

Originally Posted by psychopathetic (Post 1947993)
Is it possible at all that for them...their own add truly is a gift or gives them great strength or whatever?

I think those people are often talking about legitimate gifts... but they're not talking about ADHD.

There's some people who talk about ADHD being a non-disorder that actually makes us better at focusing than normal people.

Besides those guys, there's people who associate ADHD with the entirety of a person's personality and identity, so any positive traits they have are considered to be a benefit of ADHD.

In some cases, subclinical ADHD-like traits are good, and some other traits that are stereotypical associated with ADHD can be good.

anonymouslyadd 05-20-17 09:47 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Like sarah said, I don't hate, but I find it impossible to believe something with "disorder" in its name can ever be seen as a strength.

PoppnNSailinMan 05-20-17 10:45 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I find this pretty annoying, too. It reminds of the book I've seen on Amazon by Dale Archer, The ADHD Advantage: What You Thought Was a Diagnosis May Be Your Greatest Strength (Avery; Reprint edition, 2016). I haven't read the book but hate the title.

Zoom Dude 05-21-17 06:24 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I have a hard time seeing anger or opposition as preferred tools. They may have their place in a particular moment, but adopting them as a constant state of being will only lead you to a less advantageous place than other, better approaches.

They are certainly satisfying in the moment. (And let's be truthful, 'in the moment' is where we live.) But long term, they can only contribute to isolation, which is one of the most devastating and least-recognized results of this disorder. I would advise getting yourself into these otherwise-well-meaning peoples' heads to see why they think what they think, then educate them about what ADHD really does to you in a way they can understand. It's harder, takes longer, and doesn't connect with some people, but ultimately it gets better results for the NTs in general and doesn't turn you into someone others avoid.

The five famous people who researchers generally agree had ADHD are Einstein, Edison, Mozart, Franklin and Churchill. They were all personally successful and contributed more to all of humanity than any of us could ever dream of. But their lives were troubled too, made worse by their ADHD. You can be successful with ADHD if you are able to make accommodations for it. Along with those accommodations, ADHD probably did contribute to these peoples' capability to do great things.

But that doesn't mean ADHD didn't kick their butts in other more mundane ways. Just like it does to all of us.

ZD

Fuzzy12 05-21-17 06:44 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
The only famous person that I can believe has adhd is Michael Phelps.

dvdnvwls 05-21-17 08:00 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Well, Thomas Edison seems at least not impossible, being well known for having mountains of unfinished projects, doing poorly in school, and so on. It's not difficult to imagine that he might have had ADHD - but then again, it's easy to imagine other things instead.

sarahsweets 05-22-17 04:25 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
People are always mentioning the same famous people and saying they had adhd. How do we know this. Saying researchers think they did, or theorize they did doesnt mean much to me. You can say a lot of dead famous people had some sort of disorder without any evidence.

Zoom Dude 05-22-17 06:49 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sarahsweets (Post 1948630)
People are always mentioning the same famous people and saying they had adhd. How do we know this. Saying researchers think they did, or theorize they did doesnt mean much to me. You can say a lot of dead famous people had some sort of disorder without any evidence.

That list came from Driven to Distraction by Hollowell and Ratey. (Both of whom are highly regarded researchers who have ADHD as well.) As I understand it, there are plenty more historical big names who are suspected of having ADHD. (Lots of musicians and composers for some reason.) The five I listed are those where there is sufficient biographical data available to make a very strong case for ADHD.

They base these assessments on an accumulation of lots of little indicators. Einstein was once given what we would today call an aptitude test, and he was told he wasn't even suited to be the equivalent of an electrician. Edison was not much of a scientist at all, but he was a relentless, compulsive experimenter. If he had been a good scientist, he might have continued developing his nickel-iron battery that was used in all the electric vehicle runabouts that were popular at the time, and discovered the nickel-metal-hydride battery. That could have changed the world, allowing us to bypass gasoline-fueled cars and the rise of Big Oil. But he didn't. Not enough focus.

It's important to understand that what most people 'know' about important historical figures involves a lot of myths. That's because the public in general can't deal with a lot of detail. Our collective memory works much better if we latch onto a simple story, which frequently misses a lot or is just plain wrong in some ways.

Galileo was forced to renounce his insistence that the earth was not the center of the universe, or face excommunication. If you dig deeper into the story, you find that Galileo was a long time annoyance to the church. He was one of the few outside the church with a proper education, and he loved contradicting church doctrine. When he claimed the earth-centric model of the universe was false, the church, who had their own astronomers, knew at the time that he might very well be right. (There is documented proof of this.) He wasn't silenced because he was a blasphemer, he was silenced because he was causing a major PR problem for the church and had to be stopped. He was finally pardoned by the church in 1992. (No, that's not a typo.)

I don't think Galileo is claimed to have had ADHD. The point here is that there is plenty more detail known about historical figures than what the general public knows. When well-regarded ADHD researchers claim a high probability that some big historical names had ADHD, I'm inclined to believe them. I do not, however, believe success naturally follows ADHD, or that these people had easy lives. In every case they had the freedom to arrange their lives in ways that mitigated the effects of the disorder and maximize their strengths, and still suffered plenty for it. ADHD is no picnic.

ZD

Lloyd_ 05-22-17 10:55 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zoom Dude (Post 1948554)

I would advise getting yourself into these otherwise-well-meaning peoples' heads to see why they think what they think, then educate them about what ADHD really does to you in a way they can understand. It's harder, takes longer, and doesn't connect with some people, but ultimately it gets better results for the NTs in general and doesn't turn you into someone others avoid.

Most people from my experience don't want to hear it, to them 'you're just making excuses', superiors at work only care about productivity and if you're not outputting to their expectations then out the door you go is their attitude.

Jenn1202 05-22-17 11:24 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
ADHD causes lots of impairments. Believe me I know. I've suffered so much because of my ADD-related impairments throughout me life and yeah, there were times when it sucked a** (honestly it still does). I've gotten into sh***y situations because of this disorder. But my ADD has also made me creative, energetic and adventurous. I can honestly say that my life never gets boring, probably largely because of my ADD. I often find myself in the craziest situations.

ADD can be a major obstacle and it can also get you really far in life if you find a way to get around your impairments and use your strengths. I'm still trying to find a way to do this and honestly I'm not sure one exists. But I can honestly say that ADD is usually not all negative.

Kunga Dorji 05-23-17 02:12 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PoppnNSailinMan (Post 1948457)
I find this pretty annoying, too. It reminds of the book I've seen on Amazon by Dale Archer, The ADHD Advantage: What You Thought Was a Diagnosis May Be Your Greatest Strength (Avery; Reprint edition, 2016). I haven't read the book but hate the title.

Maybe you should read the book.

Whatever problem we all have, that problem makes us different from the mainstream.

Those differences can be exploited as advantages, if you know enough about the problem and yourself to do so.

From my perspective, there are advantages to my attention style- I see patterns well and find correlations that others do not. Mind you I cant always follow through and make that into something useful.

In other words it is possible to exploit the difference to find a niche-- just dont expect to be able to do well in jobs that suit highly methodical people well.

Zoom Dude 05-23-17 06:00 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lloyd_ (Post 1948732)
Most people from my experience don't want to hear it, to them 'you're just making excuses', superiors at work only care about productivity and if you're not outputting to their expectations then out the door you go is their attitude.

Agreed, and I'll take it a step further. In a work environment where the stakes can be pretty high (like your job), I have always kept my ADHD a secret. Your reason is a good one for doing so, but I've always done it because most peoples' preconceptions about ADHD are mostly wrong. They have ideas about it that they won't let go, and if they know you have it they will start looking for reasons to apply those misconceptions to you.

I've read of companies (generally large and extremely enlightened) where people with ADHD can be open about it and thrive, but I've never encountered one. To me it seems vastly more workable to keep the secret rather than doing battle on a daily basis with people who can't or won't relate to you.

Best of luck,
ZD

sarahsweets 05-23-17 06:04 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zoom Dude (Post 1948554)
The five famous people who researchers generally agree had ADHD are Einstein, Edison, Mozart, Franklin and Churchill. They were all personally successful and contributed more to all of humanity than any of us could ever dream of. But their lives were troubled too, made worse by their ADHD. You can be successful with ADHD if you are able to make accommodations for it. Along with those accommodations, ADHD probably did contribute to these peoples' capability to do great things.

But that doesn't mean ADHD didn't kick their butts in other more mundane ways. Just like it does to all of us.

ZD

But is it fair to say that "generally agree" is the same as had adhd ? It seems like its too easy to say that brilliant dead people had adhd simply because it suits our purpose. We cant really know, especially since people are just as talented and they dont have adhd.
``

sarahsweets 05-23-17 06:16 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Zoom Dude (Post 1948642)
That list came from Driven to Distraction by Hollowell and Ratey. (Both of whom are highly regarded researchers who have ADHD as well.) As I understand it, there are plenty more historical big names who are suspected of having ADHD. (Lots of musicians and composers for some reason.) The five I listed are those where there is sufficient biographical data available to make a very strong case for ADHD.

Not trying to trash Hallowell but this concerns me from Wikipedia:

Quote:

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)
This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. (June 2009)
This biographical article is written like a résumé. (June 2009)


And this from his website:
Quote:

In my opinion, ADHD is a terrible term. As I see it, ADHD is neither a disorder, nor is there a deficit of attention. I see ADHD as a trait, not a disability. When it is managed properly, it can become a huge asset in one’s life. I have both ADHD and dyslexia myself and I wrote the book Positively ADD with Catherine Corman to profile a collection of fabulously successful adults with ADHD.
In no way do I agree with this despite his credentials. I do not see is as an asset even when it is well managed. This is why I take issue with famous people claimed to have adhd.
And this:
Quote:

In my work as a psychiatrist who treats ADHD, I see myself not as a doctor who treats a disability, but rather as a doctor who helps people, adults and children alike, identify, develop, and celebrate their talents. That’s why I love my work!
And this:
Quote:

A Positive, Strengths-Based Approach to ADHD

Make an appointment with Dr Hallowell!

The Hallowell method favors a comprehensive approach that addresses the totality of the child or adult who comes to us for help. Well-rounded treatment can include steps to alter first, the physical elements of what’s going on through medication, exercise, nutrition, sleep habits, prayer or meditation, as well as alternative treatments like neurofeedback and cerebellar stimulation; second, the behavioral elements of the issue through interventions like cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral modification plans, coaching, lifestyle changes, and parent counseling; and third, the psychological elements of the issue through individual therapy, couples or family therapy, or other therapies all aimed at promoting strengths and talents. Beyond that, we look at the milieu or system in which the individual lives and try to determine the best school, or the best job, or the best camp, or the best living situation, again always with the goal in mind of promoting talents and strengths.

The following is from Delivered From Distraction, my book on the treatment of ADHD, specifically the chapter “The Treatment of ADD: What Works Best”:

Whether for children or adults, the treatment of ADD should be comprehensive and include a wide range of possible interventions, certainly more than medication or some other single step. Assistance should also be provided over the long-term, as ADD generally does not go away. The person being treated may not need to go see the doctor very often, but he should always know that help is just one telephone call away.
Im guessing this is not covered by insurance and definitely for-profit expensive intervention.
Like I said he has alot of good things to talk about and employs alot of science based treatments for adhd-but claiming its a positive and all that seems more like a feel-good approach to a very real disorder.

Johnny Slick 05-23-17 04:29 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
How much of this, I wonder, is that garbage where people are like "OMG I GOT DISTRACTED BY YOUR CONVERSATION WHILE I WAS TRYING TO WORK I AM SOOOOOOOOOO ADHD", related to "OMG I WAS SAD WHEN LOST WAS FINALLY OVER I MUST SUFFER FROM MAJOR DEPRESSION DISORDER" and "OMG I WAS HAPPY ONE TIME AND LATER I WAS SAD WOW I MUST BE FULL BLOWN BIPOLAR". No, wait, people don't say that at all (although they do tell depressed people to, like, "go for a walk" and the like, which I will grant you is not a lot better). ADHD seems to be one of those conditions that people who don't have it think is, like, you know, just a personality quirk or something. My response as of late has been to ask people to consider it similar to dyslexia. Getting crappy grades in high school because I couldn't pay attention to stuff and then having to like mainline caffeine in order to get through college (in just 11 years!!!!) is not a "personality quirk".

I just... wow. How is this just a "trait" though, like, at all? There is a part of our brain that is smaller than other peoples' and which gets bigger (and eventually normal-sized for some) when we medicate it. How is this an f'ing "trait"? It definitely *feels* like there's a thing inside of me that needs to click on that doesn't when I'm not on my meds.

Lunacie 05-23-17 06:21 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Hallowell
I see ADHD as a trait, not a disability. When it is managed properly, it can become a huge asset in one’s life.

The scientific definition of "trait" is "caused by genetics." So I'm okay with
calling ADHD a "trait." But it is still a disorder, something that "disrupts and
causes distress."

I do not agree with Dr. Hallowell that it can "become a huge asset when
managed properly." I agree with Dr. Barkley that we can succeed in spite of
this disorder, not because of it.

PoppnNSailinMan 05-23-17 06:41 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lunacie (Post 1948835)
I do not agree with Dr. Hallowell that it can "become a huge asset when
managed properly." I agree with Dr. Barkley that we can succeed in spite of
this disorder, not because of it.

And both Ned Hallowell and John Ratey, the authors of Driven to Distraction and both of whom have ADHD, are examples of people who succeeded in spite of the disorder. In addition to both being MDs, Hallowell was for more than 20 years on the faculty of Harvard Medical School and John Ratey is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Kunga Dorji 05-24-17 04:39 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lunacie (Post 1948835)
The scientific definition of "trait" is "caused by genetics." So I'm okay with
calling ADHD a "trait." But it is still a disorder, something that "disrupts and
causes distress."

I do not agree with Dr. Hallowell that it can "become a huge asset when
managed properly." I agree with Dr. Barkley that we can succeed in spite of
this disorder, not because of it.

The difference here is semantic, but it carries significant impact.
To understand Hallowell properly you do need to read some of his examples in detail.

From my own perspective I clearly regard ADHD as a disorder, and I think that way because of the common and reproducible dysfunction that is identifiable in cerebellar function in ADHD (irregular eye tracking, minor coordination problems etc).
However secondary to this there are fairly predictable divergent thinking patterns - and they can be harnessed to good effect.

Hallowell's approach makes more sense to me because it is more positive, and is less likely to drag me into depression. Barkley just makes everything seem so hard.

So, what it involves is essentially moving away from the ADHD diagnosis and looking at the areas of your day to day functioning that serve you well (and seeking to develop them) and those that do not (and seeking to ensure that they don't trip you up).

In the end the more negatively you view a situation the worse it will impact on you- and that applies to everyone.

sarahsweets 05-24-17 06:41 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

In the end the more negatively you view a situation the worse it will impact on you- and that applies to everyone.
I dont call it negativity, I call it being realistic.

Fuzzy12 05-24-17 07:23 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kunga Dorji (Post 1948888)
The difference here is semantic, but it carries significant impact.
To understand Hallowell properly you do need to read some of his examples in detail.

From my own perspective I clearly regard ADHD as a disorder, and I think that way because of the common and reproducible dysfunction that is identifiable in cerebellar function in ADHD (irregular eye tracking, minor coordination problems etc).
However secondary to this there are fairly predictable divergent thinking patterns - and they can be harnessed to good effect.

Hallowell's approach makes more sense to me because it is more positive, and is less likely to drag me into depression. Barkley just makes everything seem so hard.

So, what it involves is essentially moving away from the ADHD diagnosis and looking at the areas of your day to day functioning that serve you well (and seeking to develop them) and those that do not (and seeking to ensure that they don't trip you up).

In the end the more negatively you view a situation the worse it will impact on you- and that applies to everyone.

You don't need to view adhd as a positive to view a situation as positive.

There are plenty of other things in our life that can be seen as good without having to convince yourself that everything including your disorders is a blessing.

Viewing adhd as something that has to be positive just sets you up for disappointing I think. Also it will require more effort to explain the discordance between the belief that it's a positive and the reality that it's making your life harder. Why not just accept that it's not an asset but it's also not a death sentence and you can find ways to mitigate it's effect on your life.

Rather than trying hard to find positives in adhd I think that effort can be spent more wisely trying to make your life positive in spite of adhd.

sarahsweets 05-24-17 09:09 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
:goodpost::thankyou:


Quote:

Originally Posted by Fuzzy12 (Post 1948899)
You don't need to view adhd as a positive to view a situation as positive.

There are plenty of other things in our life that can be seen as good without having to convince yourself that everything including your disorders is a blessing.

Viewing adhd as something that has to be positive just sets you up for disappointing I think. Also it will require more effort to explain the discordance between the belief that it's a positive and the reality that it's making your life harder. Why not just accept that it's not an asset but it's also not a death sentence and you can find ways to mitigate it's effect on your life.

Rather than trying hard to find positives in adhd I think that effort can be spent more wisely trying to make your life positive in spite of adhd.


Lunacie 05-24-17 12:58 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fuzzy12 (Post 1948899)
You don't need to view adhd as a positive to view a situation as positive.

There are plenty of other things in our life that can be seen as good without having to convince yourself that everything including your disorders is a blessing.

Viewing adhd as something that has to be positive just sets you up for disappointing I think. Also it will require more effort to explain the discordance between the belief that it's a positive and the reality that it's making your life harder. Why not just accept that it's not an asset but it's also not a death sentence and you can find ways to mitigate it's effect on your life.

Rather than trying hard to find positives in adhd I think that effort can be spent more wisely trying to make your life positive in spite of adhd.

Very well said. Explains my opinion on this to a T. :yes: :goodpost: :thankyou:

superherobootca 05-30-17 01:18 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
I have AD/HD and seriously struggled. I also have autism, so don't tell me about AD/HD. Until you deal with both at the same time, you have not lived the nightmare.
  • I failed in school and I was in the class with the "stupid" kids.
  • I struggled at work and in my marriage.
  • My wife left me because she was at her whits end.
  • I was suicidal and my son kept me from killing myself within minutes of my executing it.
  • I also ended up teaching myself how to master my ADHD.
  • I was able to restore my marriage in many ways.
  • I was able to become the highest performing executive at a major TV network.
  • I was able to gain mastery over my ADHD and it is my greatest gift...so hate me, but I have been to the bottom and the top.

AD/HD can be mastered, it is a lot of work, but it can be done. I was lucky, because of my position and notoriety, I was able t work with some of the leading doctors and therapists in the field and master my AD/HD.

You hate people like us...but few of us have really mastered AD/HD and been able to tell other people how it is done. I now am able to turn off the bad parts of AD/HD. What I have done is based on brain science, not hocus pocus or magic bullets. It is f---king hard, but it is worth it.

All of the negative symptoms of AD/HD can be reset and mitigated. Right now the story you are telling yourself about your ADD goes back to when you were a small child (unless you were abused or had serious trauma later in life).

EVERYONE...all people...experience something similar (read Carl Jung's writings on the shadow personality) and we actually become addicted to elements of our dark side. That is the simple version. - We actually continue harmful behaviors in addictive patterns, all fueled by emotions. Our symptoms are only indicators of a deeper emotional disconnect. (People can argue, I have the research, including recent content from people that are known experts, such as Dr. Amen.)

I believe that disintegration of the mind (mental and physical illness) is a habitual and repetitive addiction to emotions and spiritual ideations that do not effectively serve the individual, based on subjective and usually erroneous interpretations of surroundings and relationships (usually between ages 2-6).

Hate me all you want, you can feel better and people who say they are broken or mentally ill because of their AD/HD are only continuing a story that hurts themselves.

Little Missy 05-30-17 08:03 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by superherobootca (Post 1949795)
I have AD/HD and seriously struggled. I also have autism, so don't tell me about AD/HD. Until you deal with both at the same time, you have not lived the nightmare.
  • I failed in school and I was in the class with the "stupid" kids.
  • I struggled at work and in my marriage.
  • My wife left me because she was at her whits end.
  • I was suicidal and my son kept me from killing myself within minutes of my executing it.
  • I also ended up teaching myself how to master my ADHD.
  • I was able to restore my marriage in many ways.
  • I was able to become the highest performing executive at a major TV network.
  • I was able to gain mastery over my ADHD and it is my greatest gift...so hate me, but I have been to the bottom and the top.

AD/HD can be mastered, it is a lot of work, but it can be done. I was lucky, because of my position and notoriety, I was able t work with some of the leading doctors and therapists in the field and master my AD/HD.

You hate people like us...but few of us have really mastered AD/HD and been able to tell other people how it is done. I now am able to turn off the bad parts of AD/HD. What I have done is based on brain science, not hocus pocus or magic bullets. It is f---king hard, but it is worth it.

All of the negative symptoms of AD/HD can be reset and mitigated. Right now the story you are telling yourself about your ADD goes back to when you were a small child (unless you were abused or had serious trauma later in life).

EVERYONE...all people...experience something similar (read Carl Jung's writings on the shadow personality) and we actually become addicted to elements of our dark side. That is the simple version. - We actually continue harmful behaviors in addictive patterns, all fueled by emotions. Our symptoms are only indicators of a deeper emotional disconnect. (People can argue, I have the research, including recent content from people that are known experts, such as Dr. Amen.)

I believe that disintegration of the mind (mental and physical illness) is a habitual and repetitive addiction to emotions and spiritual ideations that do not effectively serve the individual, based on subjective and usually erroneous interpretations of surroundings and relationships (usually between ages 2-6).

Hate me all you want, you can feel better and people who say they are broken or mentally ill because of their AD/HD are only continuing a story that hurts themselves.

Do tell. What is your position and notoriety?

sarahsweets 05-30-17 08:30 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by superherobootca (Post 1949795)
I have AD/HD and seriously struggled. I also have autism, so don't tell me about AD/HD. Until you deal with both at the same time, you have not lived the nightmare.

I am sure there are many autistic people who would take offense to you saying living with autism is a nightmare.

Quote:

[list][*]I failed in school and I was in the class with the "stupid" kids.
How nice of you to refer to them as stupid.

Quote:

  • I also ended up teaching myself how to master my ADHD.

  • I didnt know adhd could be mastered.

    Quote:

    I was able to become the highest performing executive at a major TV network.
    Hmmm....

    Quote:

  • I was able to gain mastery over my ADHD and it is my greatest gift...so hate me, but I have been to the bottom and the top.
No one will hate you for thinking this, the thread starter did use harsh words but people will challenge and dispute you.


Quote:

AD/HD can be mastered, it is a lot of work, but it can be done. I was lucky, because of my position and notoriety, I was able t work with some of the leading doctors and therapists in the field and master my AD/HD.

You hate people like us...but few of us have really mastered AD/HD and been able to tell other people how it is done. I now am able to turn off the bad parts of AD/HD. What I have done is based on brain science, not hocus pocus or magic bullets. It is f---king hard, but it is worth it.
There is no scientifically proven way (yet) to master or cure adhd. Unless you can provide me with sources its just your word.

Quote:

All of the negative symptoms of AD/HD can be reset and mitigated. Right now the story you are telling yourself about your ADD goes back to when you were a small child (unless you were abused or had serious trauma later in life).
Adhd must have been present in childhood before the age of 12. You must have 2 or more impairments in 6 or more areas of your life for it to be adhd. So of course we think of our childhood.

Quote:

EVERYONE...all people...experience something similar (read Carl Jung's writings on the shadow personality) and we actually become addicted to elements of our dark side. That is the simple version. - We actually continue harmful behaviors in addictive patterns, all fueled by emotions. Our symptoms are only indicators of a deeper emotional disconnect. (People can argue, I have the research, including recent content from people that are known experts, such as Dr. Amen.)
Addiction is a whole other issue. I could tell you about addiction til Im blue in the face but I dont claim to be an expert-even though my experience and research makes me feel like one. Emotions are the backbone of many ways we deal with our sh*t. I dont think its fair to say "we all" continue addictive behaviors because not everyone is an addict and adhd doesnt = addict. Dr Amen can be commended for his research but we all have our opinion on who we think are experts. I dont believe in his many subsets of adhd that he labels people as nor all his treatments but I wont discount his contribution to the adhd field.

Quote:

I believe that disintegration of the mind (mental and physical illness) is a habitual and repetitive addiction to emotions and spiritual ideations that do not effectively serve the individual, based on subjective and usually erroneous interpretations of surroundings and relationships (usually between ages 2-6).
So my bipolar is really just addiction to emotions and spiritual ideations based on my relationships and surroundings? I dont think so. There isnt research to back you up on that one.

Quote:

Hate me all you want, you can feel better and people who say they are broken or mentally ill because of their AD/HD are only continuing a story that hurts themselves.
I havent heard anyone say mental illness and adhd are the same thing. Similar maybe, but the same? No way. Different malfunctions of the neurotransmitters and all that jazz going on in the brain.
I also do not believe in hate.
All life is precious.

Lunacie 05-30-17 11:30 AM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by superherobootca (Post 1949795)
I have AD/HD and seriously struggled. I also have autism, so don't tell me about AD/HD. Until you deal with both at the same time, you have not lived the nightmare.

.

Even though I have both adhd and autism myself (also anxiety, depression,
PTSD, migraine disorder, back pain and severe allergies) I found that comment
incredibly insulting.


Any of them alone can be a nightmare. Having all of them together is a
special kind of nightmare to live with, but any of them alone can be hard.

dvdnvwls 05-30-17 04:43 PM

Re: I hate you people who say ADD is our greatest strength
 
ADHD and autism can be nightmares when the people around us choose to make them that way.

All people (except those with severe disabilities or severe personality disorders) already help each other - it's survival. Unwillingness to help one person a little more and another person a little less, and a desire to perpetuate their own illusion of their own nonexistent "independence", people disregarding others' needs simply because their own needs have been met.

That old book "I'm OK - You're OK" was missing a category: "I'm OK, So If Anyone Else Is Not OK Then That's Their Problem". :(


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