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-   -   Do all young mammals play? (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=194275)

mildadhd 01-07-19 07:26 PM

Do all young mammals play?
 
Do all young mammals play?

This thread is meant to help parents learn to discuss everything about young mammalian social play.

The following topics are encouraged for discussion (but not limited to)

-mammalian social play.
-ruff and tumble play.
-prenatal play.
-postnatal play.
-attached play.
-attuned play.
-age one play.
-age two play.
-age three play.
-age four play.
-age five play.
-age six play.
-age seven play.
-affective play.
-cognitive play.
-instinctual play
-learned play.
-etc play.







M

mildadhd 01-08-19 09:08 PM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mildadhd (Post 2012906)
Do all young mammals play?


Yes?








M

mildadhd 01-09-19 03:15 AM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
What is play based school?

Any parent have children enrolled in a play based school?










M

Lunacie 01-09-19 12:11 PM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Curious ... what is prenatal play?

CharlesH 01-09-19 10:02 PM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mildadhd (Post 2012973)
What is play based school?

Well, how do you define 'play?'

If you're talking about physical play, I don't think there are many options for play based schools. It's cheaper and safer from a liability standpoint to just cram children into a room and force them to be quiet all day long.

mildadhd 01-10-19 05:14 PM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CharlesH (Post 2013015)
Well, how do you define 'play?'

"Physical playfulness is a birthright of every young mammal and perhaps of many other animals as well...

...Perhaps the best general definition has recently been suggested by Gordon Burghardt (2005), consisting of five criteria:

(1) The adaptive functions of play are not fully evident at the time play occurs;

(2) play is a spontaneous activity, done for its own sake, because it is fun (pleasurable);

(3) play is an exaggerated and incomplete form of adult activities;

(4) play exhibits many repetitive activities, done with abundant variations, unlike serious behaviours that are not as flexible;

(5) animals must be well fed, comfortable, and healthy for play to occur, and all stressors reduce play. "

(Paraphrasing Panksepp/Biven)








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mildadhd 01-10-19 05:29 PM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lunacie (Post 2012991)
Curious ... what is prenatal play?

True healthy play behavior occurs when the environment is playful.

Which is also the type environment best for healthy prenatal development.






M

Greyhound1 01-10-19 10:01 PM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mildadhd (Post 2013029)
"Physical playfulness is a birthright of every young mammal and perhaps of many other animals as well...

You inspired me to find out about non-mammal play.:)


I found this interesting and thought you may as well.

Quote:

Is Play Unique to Mammals


The answer appears to be no. A bird will spend hours tossing a pebble in the air, but it's nearly impossible to discern if it's goofing around or honing its talon-eye coordination. Gordon Burghardt, an expert on animal behavior at the University of Tennessee, defines play as behavior that doesn't seem to have a survival purpose, is rewarding in and of itself, and is performed when an animal is fully fed and stress-free.

By that definition, the jungle is full of horseplay. Recreation is well documented in big-brained birds, such as crows and hawks, which chase each other and drop and catch objects seemingly for the hell of it. For other animals, the data is sketchier, often relying on just one case, but does suggest that play beyond birds and mammals is indeed possible. A Komodo dragon at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., plays tug-of-war with its keepers, and soft-shelled turtles at other zoos push balls with their snouts and swim through hoops. Wild-reared octopi entertain themselves in the lab by towing toys or passing them between tentacles. Another study documents what seems to be wasps play-fighting.

"People have observed that wasps and fish can play," says Sergio Pellis, who studies animal behavior at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta. "We're finding out that play is not just for intelligent, big-brained animals."

mildadhd 01-12-19 04:30 AM

Re: Do all young mammals play?
 
Quote:

It must have been a happy time?
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=lWQ0mNvoTJY









M


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