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-   -   Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=187577)

mildadhd 08-24-17 04:51 PM

Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
What are the differences between mild AD(H)D, moderate AD(H)D and severe AD(H)D"?







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Fuzzy12 08-24-17 05:08 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Hm interesting. I guess there are two.ways you can look at this:

1. Symptom severity
2. impairment severity

Clinically I think point 1 Should matter more but when it comes to diagnosis it seems like only point 2 matters.

aeon 08-24-17 05:42 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Not sure of the science behind it, but the grading is by clinically-verified scale tests.

FWIW, my Dx indicates “ADHD, Primarily Inattentive, Severe”

Well, if you are going to bring it, bring it! :D


Cheers,
Ian

mildadhd 08-24-17 06:11 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

DSM-V also requires clinicians to specify the severity level of a client's ADHD as either Mild, Moderate, or Severe.

Mild is restricted to cases where there are few, if any, symptoms beyond those required to make the diagnosis and no more than minor impairment in functioning. In DSM-IV, where clinically significant impairment was required, these individuals would not be diagnosed.

Moderate is simply defined as symptoms or functional impairment between 'mild' and 'severe'. People in this category may not necessarily show clinically significant impairment and thus also would not have been diagnosed under DSM-IV.

Severe is reserved for cases with many symptoms in excess of those required for the diagnosis, or several symptoms that are especially severe, or marked impairment resulting from symptoms.
http://www.helpforadd.com/2013/june.htm



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Lunacie 08-24-17 06:18 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fuzzy12 (Post 1961316)
Hm interesting. I guess there are two.ways you can look at this:

1. Symptom severity
2. impairment severity

Clinically I think point 1 Should matter more but when it comes to diagnosis it seems like only point 2 matters.

Looks like it's number of symptoms present as well severity/impairment.
Wonder how they weigh all that when there are other diagnoses present?
In my case, anxiety, past depression, ptsd and a touch of autism.

Fuzzy12 08-24-17 06:19 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
So does this mean that neither mild nor moderate cases as per the new definition would have been diagnosed at all in dsm lV?

mildadhd 08-24-17 07:08 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fuzzy12 (Post 1961328)
So does this mean that neither mild nor moderate cases as per the new definition would have been diagnosed at all in dsm lV?

Mild and Mild-Moderate would not likely have been diagnosed?

This confuses me because this raises the rate of diagnoses even higher.

Either the genetic estimates are really wrong, or the changes in diagnostic criteria are really wrong, or the environmental factors have a much bigger impact on the rate of diagnosis than previously thought?

Genetic factors alone could not change so quickly.

Epigenetic factors could.







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Lunacie 08-24-17 07:23 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mildadhd (Post 1961335)
Mild and Mild-Moderate would not likely have been diagnosed?

This confuses me because this raises the rate of diagnoses even higher.

Either the genetic estimates are really wrong, or the changes in diagnostic criteria are really wrong, or the environmental factors have a much bigger impact on the rate of diagnosis than previously thought?

Genetic factors alone could not change so quickly.

Epigenetic factors could.







M

I'm not sure what you're asking here.

Mild and moderate may not have been diagnosed in the past.
Inattentive types might not have been diagnosed in the past.
Girls/women often were not diagnosed in the past.

Now that these types of adhd are recognized the overall rate of diagnosis is
higher. That makes sense to me.

mildadhd 08-24-17 07:32 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lunacie (Post 1961336)
I'm not sure what you're asking here.

Mild and moderate may not have been diagnosed in the past.
Inattentive types might not have been diagnosed in the past.
Girls/women often were not diagnosed in the past.

Now that these types of adhd are recognized the overall rate of diagnosis is
higher. That makes sense to me.

What percent of the population has AD(H)D, in your opinion?

Quote:

The percent of children estimated to have ADHD has changed over time and can vary by how it is measured. The American Psychiatric Association states in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5, 2013) that 5% of children have ADHD1. However, other studies in the US have estimated higher rates in community samples.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/data.html

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Lunacie 08-24-17 08:58 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mildadhd (Post 1961337)
What percent of the population has AD(H)D, in your opinion?




M

Ugh, I hate it when I ask a question and am answered with another question.

I don't have an opinion ... the experts say between 5 to 10 percent have adhd.

Robertpaulsen 10-06-17 02:35 AM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Indeed. Just a few decades ago, adults were not diagnosed. For instance, despite chronic and severe symptoms since childhood and a half-dozen diagnoses and failed treatments for depression, adhd wasn't even considered until I insisted on a prescription for stimulants from a gp. Only after suffering a tonic-clonic seizure induced by bupropion, was I referred to a specialist in differential diagnosis - who, after a twenty minute interview, told me my life story based on the obvious classic features of adhd that I displayed. This happened in the fall of 2000 when I was thirty-four years old.

Fraser_0762 10-06-17 06:27 AM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
To be honest, I haven't met very many people who don't at least meet the mild criteria. I find it hard to envision someone with absolutely zero impairments in every aspect of their lives. But then again, it's something i've never experienced before, so being that way doesn't seem "normal" to me.

Lunacie 10-06-17 12:24 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fraser_0762 (Post 1966949)
To be honest, I haven't met very many people who don't at least meet the mild criteria. I find it hard to envision someone with absolutely zero impairments in every aspect of their lives. But then again, it's something i've never experienced before, so being that way doesn't seem "normal" to me.

Are there a lot of people who are 'sub-threshold' but not quite neuro-typical?
Probably. It's a spectrum of the human condition.

But there IS a threshold for the criteria to be diagnosed with adhd and a person
must cross that threshold to be diagnosed.

Fraser_0762 10-06-17 12:31 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lunacie (Post 1967002)
a person must cross that threshold to be diagnosed.

Well technically yes, you're right. In practice? Absolutely not. It would require every assessor to adhere to the exact same standard right across the globe. Something that obviously doesn't happen.

You could be turned down by 20 assessors/psychiatrists in a row, but eventually you'll find one that will diagnose you.

Lunacie 10-06-17 02:30 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fraser_0762 (Post 1967004)
Well technically yes, you're right. In practice? Absolutely not. It would require every assessor to adhere to the exact same standard right across the globe. Something that obviously doesn't happen.

You could be turned down by 20 assessors/psychiatrists in a row, but eventually you'll find one that will diagnose you.

Unfortunately, it also goes the other way and people are wrongly diagnosed
with depression or bipolar or nothing at all when they have had adhd all their
lives. There is no blood test, and even with a blood test there can be a false
positive or a false negative.
.

mildadhd 10-06-17 03:01 PM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fraser_0762 (Post 1966949)
To be honest, I haven't met very many people who don't at least meet the mild criteria. I find it hard to envision someone with absolutely zero impairments in every aspect of their lives. But then again, it's something i've never experienced before, so being that way doesn't seem "normal" to me.

Very interesting!

Considering people with..

-Perfect self-regulation skills
-Moderate self-regulation skills
-Mild self-regulation skills

Verses

-Severe deficits of self-regulation
-Moderate deficits of self-regulation
-Mild deficits of self-regulation

If we pretend that some people have perfect self-regulation skills (true or not).

Would the people with moderate self regulation skills have at least mild deficits of self regulation?

Would the people with mild self regulation skills have at least moderate deficits of self regulation?



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sarahsweets 10-07-17 06:41 AM

Re: Mild AD(H)D, Moderate AD(H)D and Severe AD(H)D
 
I used to get all worked up about this and then I changed as a person from the inside and realized that what is severe for me could be a cake walk for someone else.


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