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Old 02-03-18, 09:26 PM
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Re: Questions about so called SCT?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mildadhd View Post
I wonder if hypoactivity being associated with ADHD-PI is different than hypoactivity being associated with SCT?
I don't know.

Hypoactivity is not among the DSM-5 criteria for ADHD-PI.

Still, some people who meet the criteria for ADHD-PI may also be hypoactive.

^-- That goes back to what Aeon was saying about inclusion vs. exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria are things that contibute to making the diagnosis. Exclusion criteria are things that rule out a diagnosis. Hypoactivity is not one of the inclusion criteria for ADHD (since it doesn't count towards making a diagnosis of ADHD), but being hypoactive does not rule out ADHD, either (since you can be hypoactive and still meet the criteria for an ADHD diagnosis).

Quote:
Originally Posted by mildadhd
I wonder if SCT symptoms are severe ADHD-PI symptoms (that do not qualify for ADHD-C)?
That's a good question.

I don't think of ADHD-PI symptoms as separate things from ADHD-C symptoms, because people with ADHD-C have to have some of those same symptoms to qualify for diagnosis. They're ADHD symptoms that happen to come from the "inattention" category or domain or dimension.

Some people think of ADHD-PI (with at least some hyperactive-impulsive symptoms) as just a milder form of ADHD-C.

This model assumes that the more severe your ADHD, the more symptoms (especially hyperactive-impulsive symptoms) you'll have.

Other people think of the inattentive symptoms and the hyperactive-impulsive symptoms as two somewhat separate domains -- so that you could have very severe inattention and only mild (or no) hyperactivity or impulsivity, or vice-versa.

In that model, severity is more about the "strength" of the symptoms and/or the impairment caused by whatever symptoms are present, rather than by the number or type of symptoms involved. So someone with really extreme inattention could have more severe ADHD, while someone who just barely ticks all the boxes for ADHD-C could have a milder case of ADHD.

DSM-5 asks clinicians to rate severity based on a hybrid of symptom count (how many symptoms a person has) and degree of functional impairment (how much they're affected by the symptoms).

It is possible that some instances of "SCT"/"CDD" symptoms could represent extreme manifestations of inattention of some kind. Some of the "SCT"/"CDD" symptoms may be different in nature from what's seen in ADHD. There is ongoing research to try to sort out where there may be overlap or differences between the symptom sets for ADHD and "SCT"/"CDD". Throw in comorbidities like anxiety, mood disorders, autism, LDs, etc., and things get super-complicated.

Last edited by namazu; 02-03-18 at 09:37 PM.. Reason: clarification
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