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Old 02-24-18, 09:11 PM
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Re: ADD Linked With RMD

Quote:
Originally Posted by allesandro1 View Post
I have a diagnosis of ADD and periodic limb movement disorder--dont know if that is the same thing or not
Quote:
RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME AND PERIODIC LIMB MOVEMENTS IN SLEEP (RLS/PLMS)
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs, which is often accompanied by uncomfortable sensations in the legs or, less frequently, other body parts. These sensations are worse at rest, relieved by movement, and worse in the evening or night and at rest. In RLS, patients frequently experience insomnia from the leg discomfort and the need to move around. The diagnosis of RLS is based on the revised RLS criteria developed by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG).23 Although RLS is traditionally considered a disorder of middle to older age, several case series show that it may occur in childhood.24 In addition, one large survey of 10,523 families in Britain and the United States showed that clinically significant RLS occurs in 0.5% of children and 1% of adolescents.25 However, children may report RLS symptoms differently than adults, in part because of their limited ability to describe RLS sensations. Moreover, the clinical presentation of RLS may differ in children. Considering these particularities, the IRLSSG has proposed a set of criteria specific for childhood.23

Patients with RLS also frequently have a related sleep disorder called periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS). PLMS are defined as movements that last 0.510 seconds and recur every 5 to 90 seconds in a series of ≥ 4.26 They more commonly affect the legs, although the arms may be involved as well. Typical movements consist of simultaneous flexions of the hips, knees, and ankles. Eighty percent of adult patients with RLS have PLMS.23 PLMS have been reported in children with RLS although their prevalence in children has not been adequately studied.23 In RLS, the role of PLMS in the production of insomnia or daytime symptoms of fatigue is controversial. However, periodic leg movements sometimes occur in wakefulness (PLMW) in RLS and may contribute to the insomnia.23

In last decade, there has been growing research in sleep disruption associated with ADHD.6 It has been correctly pointed out that sleep disturbances may (1) mimic ADHD symptoms in the evening or (2) be associated with ADHD symptoms.27,28 In both cases, the appropriate treatment of sleep disturbances may significantly improve diurnal ADHD symptoms.

Given the relationship between RLS and sleep fragmentation, some clinicians started to look for a potential association between ADHD and RLS symptoms. Since then, interest in the link between ADHD and RLS has progressively grown. In a survey of the literature completed in 2005, Cortese et al29 reviewed available evidence on the relationship between RLS and ADHD.2935 In addition, new studies have emerged since then.3638

In light of these considerations, the aims of this section are (1) to critically review evidence on the relationship between ADHD and RLS; (2) to examine the potential mechanisms underlying this relationship; and (3) to present some future directions for the research in this area.
From the same article I shared.
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