View Single Post
  #19  
Old 01-30-07, 10:34 AM
QueensU_girl QueensU_girl is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto Ontario canada
Posts: 5,098
Blog Entries: 3
Thanks: 571
Thanked 1,015 Times in 638 Posts
QueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant futureQueensU_girl has a brilliant future
re: 17

You most certainly don't need flashbacks to have a PTSD-like syndrome. (This is a common misbelief made by 'professionals', based on adult-male research.)

(In fact, many people -=avoid=- situations/stimuli that cause flashbacks. *laugh* By definition, PTSD, etc, are disorders of *avoidance*, remember.)

Flashbacks are not always verbal or visual and not always in our declarative ('sayable') memory storage, either.

For example, smell or fear, without words, is common. Dr. Van Der Kolk talks about a woman who was locked in a closet as a child. She could not recall this, but only remembered the panic feelings/fear and a 'musty smell'.

In fact, one Hallmark of trauma is to "not have words" for the experience or emotion, just the un-namable feeling, such as anxiety or depression w/o knowing why.

There is a good book out there right now called "The UNSAYABLE: the hidden language of trauma", which addressses these issues.

http://www.amazon.ca/Unsayable-Hidde...e=UTF8&s=books


------------------------------------------------------------------

You could have DES-NOS (Disorder of Extreme Stress - Not Otherwise Specified), which is also called Complex PTSD. http://www.traumacenter.org/SpecialI...ct2006JTS3.pdf


At that point, trauma is -=stuck=- in the body, etc. Intrusions (thoughts) and re-experencing (somatic/bodily) is more physical than declarative/mental/memory- based.

See page 3 of the above article. It details how there are serious PHYSICAL effects of remaining in a prolonged stress response, despite it being many years after the original stress had ended. Much of this is the results of our internal stress chemicals remaining stuck on HIGH and doing long-term damage to our bodies.)

- http://www.amazon.ca/Waking-Tiger-Tr...e=UTF8&s=books


DES-NOS is probably more common than regular PTSD, actually, as more women have Complex PTSD, and 2/3 of people with trauma disorders ARE FEMALE. (And ofcourse people tend to get re-victimized later in life for a complicated set of reasons, increasing their odds of the traumas having many layers, and this increases and reinforces the chances of them maintaining.)

When I was in school, and on a mental health team, at least 85% of the female case files had DES-NOS type trauma in their history. Mental health services are not equipped to deal with the fallout of early life trauma, as it is often behavioural and non-verbal, such as addictions, aggression/revictimization, suicidality. (Unfortunately, "trauma looks crazy", etc.)

Last edited by QueensU_girl; 01-30-07 at 10:51 AM..
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to QueensU_girl For This Useful Post:
rickymooston (06-10-15)