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Old 09-25-11, 03:25 PM
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Re: NLD/NVLD/Visual Processing Problems? Does This Illusion Work?

Thanks for playing, y'all...

TygerSan and Fortune, that's interesting.

Nonverbal LD is one of those weird labels that is defined and applied extremely inconsistently, I've found -- in some cases, it's basically used interchangeably with Asperger's, in some cases, it just means non-phonological LD, etc. (This is frustrating to me.)

But in any case, what I was wondering was whether people who, for various non-sensory reasons (LDs or other processing-related issues), tend to strongly favor auditory and/or verbal modes of learning (which could certainly include some flavors of autistic-spectrum disorders), might be less susceptible to this illusion than people with stronger visual-processing (or facial-processing?) skills.

Based on this small handful of anecdotal responses, it seems possible. Obviously, this was not a scientific study. But given that the original video implied that the phenomenon was universal,* and even the researcher himself still falls for it, despite knowing exactly how it works, some counterexamples would really be all that's needed to say "uh...not so fast!". And this could nicely illustrate something about the ways different people make sense of stimuli they encounter -- we don't all do it the same way. *Tygersan, thanks for pointing out that other explanations of the illusion suggest more nuanced outcomes, though!

The illusion gets me. However, I think my visual processing problems are relatively mild (and more visual memory-related, which might play into this type of phenomenon less because it's right in front of me).

- N.
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