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Old 05-31-13, 01:26 PM
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Re: Accommodations for Children and Teens

Make Rules and Time Obvious and in Physical Forms

- Post rules on posters for each work period, or

- Create a 3-sided stop sign with class rules for young kids

- Red = lecture, yellow =desk work, green = free play

- Place laminated color-coded card sets on desks with a set of rules for each subject or class activity

- Have child restate rules at start of each activity

- Have child use soft vocal self-instruction during work

- Create “nag tapes”-taped encouragement from Dad or Mom with reminders of rules for on-task behavior–child can listen to tape during school work

- Use timers, watches, taped time signals, etc. anything to show how much time they have to do an assignment.

Train Self-Awareness

- Child records work productivity on a daily chart or graph on public display so they can see how well they are performing in class over time

- Child rates them self on a daily conduct card (see Figure 1) and teacher checks it to see if he/she agree with child’s self-evaluation.

- Teacher cues a young child to self-monito rby saying “Turtle” or “Chill” at which:

- Child stops what they are doing, pulling hands and legs close together

- Child slowly looks about the classroom

- Child asks them self “What was I told to do?”

- Child returns to assigned task

- Child wears a tactile cueing device that vibrates at random, frequent intervals: The Motivaider–it’s a vibrating small box with a built-in digital timer. Set timer to periodically cue the child to pay attention.
Available at addwarehouse.com

- Nonverbal confidential cues for teens–tell teen that if you drop a paper clip by their desk, it was no accident. For them, it’s a cue to pay attention to teacher

- Severe cases, consider videotaping child in class with weekly feedback session with school psychologist

Possible Punishment Methods (check with school principle on district policies!)

- Mild, private, direct reprimands–personalize it (go to child, touch child on arm or shoulder, make a brief corrective statement)

- Immediacy is the key to discipline: Swift justice! What makes punishment work is thespeed with which it is implemented following misbehavior

- Try the “Do A Task” procedure in place of standard time out:

*Place a desk at back of class with worksheets stacked on it
*When a child misbehaves, tell them what they did wrong and give them a number
*Child goes to the desk and does that number of worksheets while timed out
*When work is done, place it on teacher’s desk and return to normal seat

- Response Cost (loss of tokens or a privilege contingent on misbehavior)

- Moral essays–Have child write “Why I should not have . . . (e.g. hit other children) and what I should have done instead.”

- Establish a quiet “chill out” location where child can be sent for regaining emotional control when child is upset

- Use formal time outs in class or private room; hallway time outs don’t work

- Use In- school suspensions or trip to BD/ED class for severe cases
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