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  #46  
Old 05-28-11, 01:31 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

These such placement tests will ask you to grade choices A,B.C. etc as how you feel about them. To choose how strongly your emotions are in regards to subjects may be hindered by AS.
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  #47  
Old 05-06-12, 04:37 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

I probably shouldn't have picked this user name (labeling myself depressed as an identity). A problem for me is that being a software developer has been one of my main goals in life for a very long time. So, deciding that I suck at it is not very pleasant. I think I am competent, I just take a very long time to accomplish anything. Also, the end product is less interesting to me than the process, which is not a very good trait to have for an employee. I mean that I will spend way too much time on some little detail and I hate to just hack something together. So, essentially I want a mentally stimulating job where deadlines are less important... If I had been more focused in my youth, I could have become some sort of researcher maybe. I have no degree. I was thinking of trying to become a system administrator while trying to work on open source projects outside of work to improve my skills... I am not a crisis junkie though. So, that type of system administrator position would not work very well for me.
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  #48  
Old 11-25-12, 12:36 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

I teach low income at risk preschool children. I have been doing it for more then a decade. I feel I do well with this job because there is a mix of "office" type record keeping work and hands on work with kids. The one good thing about children is they are all different. Every day is a different adventure so it's hard to get bored and because so many of them come from challenging home lives they have lots of needs. I can empathise with that. School wasn't easy for me either. the other good thing is I create my curriculum. It's a little different then public school where they tell you in October you will teach this topic using this book. There's more flexibility and room for creativity which keeps me engaged. Preschoolers are hands on learners who learn through play, and that's perfect for me!
The down side? The money isn't going help me retire at an early age that's for sure. But I make an okay living and I do have retirement options and best of all I don't get up every day thinking I'd rather eat rat poison then go to this job! So it's all good!
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  #49  
Old 12-15-12, 01:26 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keppig View Post
The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make
by Barbara Reinhold

Changing careers is never easy. Half the world thinks you've lost your mind, headhunters say you'll never work again and your mother-in-law steps up the old "I told you so" routine. But for many burned-out, bored or multitalented folks who are sitting on skills they're not getting a chance to use, changing fields is the only way to keep from losing their marbles.

Regardless of your career change strategy, never make these 10 mistakes:

1. Don't look for a job in another field without some intense introspection. Nothing is worse than leaping before you look. Make sure you're not escaping to a field that fits you just as poorly as your last.

2. Don't look for "hot" fields unless they're a good fit for you. You wouldn't try to squeeze into your skinny cousin's suit, so why try a field because it works for him? People who are trying to help you will come along and do the equivalent of whispering "plastics" in your ear. Instead of jumping at their suggestions, take time to consider your options. Decide what you really want to do. When you enter a field just because it's hot, burnout isn't far behind.


3. Don't go into a field because your friend is doing well in it. Get thorough information about the fields you're considering by networking, reading and doing online research. Having informational interviews with alumni from your college, colleagues, friends or family is a fun way to get the scoop on different fields.


4. Don't stick to possibilities you already know about. Stretch your perception of what might work for you. Explore career fields you learn about from self-assessment exercises.


5. Don't let money be the deciding factor. There's not enough money in the world to make you happy if your job doesn't suit you. Workplace dissatisfaction and stress is the number-one health problem for working adults. This is particularly true for career changers, who often earn less until they get their sea legs in a different field.


6. Don't keep your dissatisfaction to yourself or try to make the switch alone. This is the time to talk to people (probably not your boss just yet, nor some coworker who likes to tell tales). Friends, family and colleagues need to know what's going on so they can help you tap into those 90-plus percent of jobs that aren't advertised until somebody has them all sewn up.


7. Don't go back to school to get retreaded unless you've done some test drives in the new field. You're never too old for an internship, a volunteer experience or trying your hand at a contract assignment in a new field. There are lots of ways to get experience that won't cost you anything except your time. A new degree may or may not make the world sit up and take notice. Be very sure where you want to go before you put yourself through the pain and debt of another degree program.


8. Be careful when using placement agencies or search firms. Do some research to be sure to find a good match. Ask those who work in the field you’re trying to get into or other successful career changers for suggestions. Try to find a firm that knows how to be creative when placing career changers -- not one that solely focuses on moving people up the ladder in the same field.


9. Don't go to a career counselor or a career transitions agency expecting they can tell you which field to enter. Career advisors are facilitators, and they'll follow your lead. They can help ferret out your long-buried dreams and talents, but you'll have to do the research and the decision making by yourself. Anyone who promises to tell you what to do is dangerous.


10. Don't expect to switch overnight. A thorough career change usually will take a minimum of six months to pull off, and the time frequently stretches to a year or more.

Changing fields is one of the most invigorating things you can do. It's like experiencing youth all over again, except with the wisdom of whatever age you are now.

I find this very negative, its all dont's. Those don't encourage people at all if they seriously can no longer handle or were an extremely bad fit for their career. Negative reinforcements don't help a person who's unhappy like that though, I suspect it would only lead them more towards depression.


I know people who've blatently chosen to do exactly the opposite of some of these "dont's" as well and are very, very happy with choosing to do what they found out was very advantageous financially for someone else(who eneded up being a role model) for change.
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  #50  
Old 12-17-12, 01:52 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

Thanks for the post..it was very helpful..I always had issues dealing with my career but this post solved all my queries...
Keep posting
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  #51  
Old 02-07-13, 01:10 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

my education ended when i was 11 years old, i started full time employment at 15, i got into silly trouble in my first job. i passed my driving test when i was 17, thats when i started changing jobs, i am of low working class, a jack of all labouring jobs who mastered none. there were few motorways when i first started lorry driving, as they opened more and more long distant driving became impossible, motorways are so boring, i used to have pretend races in my head or count the distance between hedge posts. i was 25 when i started driving taxi's, that was the job for me, no thinking, no getting dirty or heavy lifting, but i was a compulsive gambler and i quickly got into working 16 hour days 365 day every year, all that time with no time or money for my kids. but i had no boss and i did'nt have to work with people, people in the back were in and out in no time. i had serious withdrawels coming off gambling, i was well pee'd off a couple years after quiting, i was still hopeless with money, without debt i could'nt work, so i bobbed along for years buying this and that, everything under control, then my wife started the menapause and started to give me hell, i desearved it but it was depressing her being so hateful towards me, we went through about 12 years of that, ending with me £45,000 in debt and losing my taxi licence, i was always being pulled in by the licencing authority for being a naughty boy, driving and drug offences. then life began at 60, i managed to get myself a job as a courier, within a couple of years i had the round i wanted and was fitter than i'd been for years, i was 62 years old and found myself able to put a little money on one side for the first time in my life. i deliver parcels to houses catalogue and internet shopping stuff, its self employed and i drive my own car, i have a van nowadays, iv'e had 5 vehicles in the 7 years i been doing the job, i have always been quite heavy on cars as with everything else. i have saved a few thousand only to spend it on the vehicles and my son, he is a serious case of adhd, he cant live on his own and is hopeless with money, i explain to my wife what its like for him to be anxious about not having the ability to sort something, he has lots of fines to pay, he has a full time job but is not big money, he lives with me cos he cant handle life on his own.
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  #52  
Old 03-22-13, 01:08 AM
helpmestudy29 helpmestudy29 is offline
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

Great post! I will use this while I am looking for a job. Thanks again for putting it all together in a helpful and useful manner.
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  #53  
Old 03-28-13, 07:26 PM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

i have had plenty of jobs, but without a doubt my last decision was the worst- i had a gud job in a field i always wanted to get into (HR), a manager which was supportive(that was before i was on meds or even diagnosed with adhd) and a lovely environment at the workplace- but i hated where i lived and wanted to get away from Austria so I moved to the UK after only working there fore 6 months.... 6 months in HR is tiny and now i look for a job since 4 months in this field and cant find anything... DAMN!
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  #54  
Old 05-20-13, 12:56 AM
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

I liked the comment about mentoring..I have harbored a desire to teach aerobics but have been scared to "go there"...but I keep thinking how fun it could be, and would employ my skills with people, my love of dance and music, and would be a fun way to stay in shape. I am an artist and singer, have sold my art too--but I am not a self-starter and flail around with no structure/deadline - inotherwords *NOT* entrepreneur material. Any comments or encouragement welcome.
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  #55  
Old 11-14-13, 02:35 AM
saniamirza saniamirza is offline
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Re: The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make - ADHD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keppig View Post
The 10 Worst Mistakes Career Changers Make
by Barbara Reinhold

Changing careers is never easy. Half the world thinks you've lost your mind, headhunters say you'll never work again and your mother-in-law steps up the old "I told you so" routine. But for many burned-out, bored or multitalented folks who are sitting on skills they're not getting a chance to use, changing fields is the only way to keep from losing their marbles.

Regardless of your career change strategy, never make these 10 mistakes:

1. Don't look for a job in another field without some intense introspection. Nothing is worse than leaping before you look. Make sure you're not escaping to a field that fits you just as poorly as your last.

2. Don't look for "hot" fields unless they're a good fit for you. You wouldn't try to squeeze into your skinny cousin's suit, so why try a field because it works for him? People who are trying to help you will come along and do the equivalent of whispering "plastics" in your ear. Instead of jumping at their suggestions, take time to consider your options. Decide what you really want to do. When you enter a field just because it's hot, burnout isn't far behind.


3. Don't go into a field because your friend is doing well in it. Get thorough information about the fields you're considering by networking, reading and doing online research. Having informational interviews with alumni from your college, colleagues, friends or family is a fun way to get the scoop on different fields.


4. Don't stick to possibilities you already know about. Stretch your perception of what might work for you. Explore career fields you learn about from self-assessment exercises.


5. Don't let money be the deciding factor. There's not enough money in the world to make you happy if your job doesn't suit you. Workplace dissatisfaction and stress is the number-one health problem for working adults. This is particularly true for career changers, who often earn less until they get their sea legs in a different field.


6. Don't keep your dissatisfaction to yourself or try to make the switch alone. This is the time to talk to people (probably not your boss just yet, nor some coworker who likes to tell tales). Friends, family and colleagues need to know what's going on so they can help you tap into those 90-plus percent of jobs that aren't advertised until somebody has them all sewn up.


7. Don't go back to school to get retreaded unless you've done some test drives in the new field. You're never too old for an internship, a volunteer experience or trying your hand at a contract assignment in a new field. There are lots of ways to get experience that won't cost you anything except your time. A new degree may or may not make the world sit up and take notice. Be very sure where you want to go before you put yourself through the pain and debt of another degree program.


8. Be careful when using placement agencies or search firms. Do some research to be sure to find a good match. Ask those who work in the field you’re trying to get into or other successful career changers for suggestions. Try to find a firm that knows how to be creative when placing career changers -- not one that solely focuses on moving people up the ladder in the same field.


9. Don't go to a career counselor or a career transitions agency expecting they can tell you which field to enter. Career advisors are facilitators, and they'll follow your lead. They can help ferret out your long-buried dreams and talents, but you'll have to do the research and the decision making by yourself. Anyone who promises to tell you what to do is dangerous.


10. Don't expect to switch overnight. A thorough career change usually will take a minimum of six months to pull off, and the time frequently stretches to a year or more.

Changing fields is one of the most invigorating things you can do. It's like experiencing youth all over again, except with the wisdom of whatever age you are now.
I am agree with you, every one should avoid such mistakes.Thanks
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