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Adult Diagnosis & Treatment This forum is for the discussion of issues related to the diagnosis of AD/HD

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Old 01-08-11, 10:27 PM
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Arrow Diagnosis Resource Info

*** This post was written by Unbelievable *** (Thanks!)


DIAGNOSIS RESOURCE INFO

You will need a doctor / psychologist / psychiatrist to confirm a diagnosis, but the following may help you to figure out if the symptoms apply. You can take one of the many online tests, print out the results and take it to your appointment.

***


From here:

http://www.help4adhd.org/en/treatment/guides/WWK9

Some common symptoms and problems of living with AD/HD include:
Poor attention; excessive distractibility
Physical restlessness or hyperactivity
Excessive impulsivity; saying or doing things without thinking
Excessive and chronic procrastination
Difficulty getting started on tasks
Difficulty completing tasks
Frequently losing things
Poor organization, planning, and time management skills
Excessive forgetfulness

Not every person with AD/HD displays all of the symptoms, nor does every person with AD/HD experience the symptoms of AD/HD to the same level of severity or impairment. Some people have mild AD/HD, while others have severe AD/HD, resulting in significant impairments. AD/HD can cause problems in school, in jobs and careers, at home, in family and other relationships, and with tasks of daily living.

*****

Symptoms of Inattention

Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort
Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities
Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
Is often forgetful in daily activities

Symptoms of Hyperactivity

Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness)
Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"
Often talks excessively

Symptoms of Impulsivity

Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
Often has difficulty awaiting turn
Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)

A diagnosis of AD/HD is determined by the clinician based on the number and severity of symptoms, the duration of symptoms, and the degree to which these symptoms cause impairment in various life domains (e.g. school, work, home). It is possible to meet diagnostic criteria for AD/HD without any symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity. The clinician must further determine if these symptoms are caused by other conditions, or are influenced by co-existing conditions.

It is important to note that the presence of significant impairment in at least two major settings of the person's life is central to the diagnosis of AD/HD. Impairment refers to how AD/HD interferes with an individual's life. Examples of impairment include losing a job because of AD/HD symptoms, experiencing excessive conflict and distress in a marriage, getting into financial trouble because of impulsive spending or failure to pay bills in a timely manner, or getting on academic probation in college due to failing grades. If the individual manifests a number of AD/HD symptoms but does not manifest significant impairment, s/he may not meet the criteria for AD/HD as a clinical disorder.

The DSM-IV TR specifies three major subtypes of AD/HD:

Primarily Inattentive Subtype. The individual mainly has difficulties with attention, organization, and follow-through.
Primarily Hyperactive/Impulsive. The individual mainly has difficulties with impulse control, restlessness, and self-control.
Combined Subtype. The individual has symptoms of inattention, impulsivity, and restlessness.

****

About Adult ADHD: Take This Self-Test

To learn more about adult ADHD and your symptoms, check each of the following statements that apply to you...

1. I have difficulty getting organized.

2. When given a task, I usually procrastinate rather than doing it right away.

3. I work on a lot of projects, but can't seem to complete most of them.

4. I tend to make decisions and act on them impulsively- like spending money, getting sexually involved with someone, diving into new activities, and changing plans.

5. I get bored easily.

6. No matter how much I do or how hard I try, I just can't seem to reach my goals.

7. I often get distracted when people are talking; I just tune out or drift off.

8. I get so wrapped up in some things I do that I can hardly stop to take a break or switch to doing something else.

9. I tend to overdo things even when they're not good for me -- like compulsive shopping, drinking too much, overworking, and overeating.

10. I get frustrated easily and I get impatient when things are going too slowly.

11. My self-esteem is not as high as that of others I know.

12. I need a lot of stimulation from things like action movies and video games, new purchases, being among lively friends, driving fast or engaging in extreme sports.

13. I tend to say or do things without thinking, and sometimes that gets me into trouble.

14. I'd rather do things my own way than follow the rules and procedures of others.

15. I often find myself tapping a pencil, swinging my leg, or doing something else to work off nervous energy.

16. I can feel suddenly depressed when I'm separated from people, projects or things that I like to be involved with.

17. I see myself differently than others see me, and when someone gets angry with me for doing something that upset them I'm often very surprised.

18. Even though I worry a lot about dangerous things that are unlikely to happen to me, I tend to be careless and accident prone.

19. Even though I have a lot of fears, people would describe me as a risk taker.

20. I make a lot of careless mistakes.

21. I have blood relatives who suffer from ADD, depression, bipolar disorder, or substance abuse.

*******

ADHD Predominantly Inattentive Type (WWK8)

http://www.help4adhd.org/about/what/WWK8

Inattention Symptoms

In the DSM-IV, the diagnostic manual of the American Psychiatric Association, there is a list of nine symptoms of "inattention" problems. Almost everybody has some difficulty with some of these sometimes. Persons who qualify for a diagnosis of ADHD have at least six of these nine symptoms and suffer significant impairment as a result. This means that daily functioning in two or more of the following areas is significantly disrupted: school, work, family or social interaction.

Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework)
Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools)
Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
Is often forgetful in daily activities

Because the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria were originally designed for children, the following questions have been developed from those criteria by the World Health Organization3 to ask adults about whether they suffer from ADHD inattention symptoms:

1. Do you often make careless mistakes when you have to work on a boring and difficult project?

2. Do you often have difficulty keeping your attention when you are doing boring or repetitive work?

3. Do you often have difficulty concentrating on what people say to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?

4. Do you often have trouble wrapping up the final details of a project, once the challenging parts have been done?

5. Do you often have difficulty getting things in order when you have to do a task that requires organization?

6. When you have a task that requires a lot of thought, do you often avoid or delay getting started?

7. Do you often misplace or have difficulty finding things at home or at work?

8. Are you often distracted by activity or noise around you?

9. Do you often have problems remembering appointments or obligations?

Individuals who have significant chronic impairment from six or more of these symptoms are likely to have ADHD if they also meet certain other criteria for diagnosis that are specified in the DSM-IV.

Doesn't everybody have problems with these inattention symptoms sometimes?

Yes, these symptoms of inattention are characteristic of everyone sometimes. Only persons who have significant impairment most of the time from these symptoms warrant a diagnosis of ADHD. If someone currently has significant impairment from at least six of these inattention symptoms and little or no hyperactive or impulsive symptoms of ADHD, they are likely to qualify for diagnosis as having ADHD, predominantly inattentive type. An individual can have little or no impairment from any hyperactive or impulsive symptoms and still fully meet DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for ADHD.4

Are the inattention symptoms of ADHD constant? Are these persons inattentive in everything they do?

No, though the inattention symptoms must be chronically impairing for a diagnosis of ADHD, this does not mean that they are constant in everything the person does. Everyone with ADHD has a few types of activity in which they are able to function quite well without much trouble from their usual inattention symptoms. They might be able to concentrate very well when playing a favorite sport or video game. They might be good at maintaining focus for a long time when watching TV shows they like, doing art or building Lego models.

When asked why they can pay attention so well for these favored activities and not for other important activities, such as school or work, they often explain that they can pay attention easily on activities that are interesting to them, but cannot make themselves pay attention to tasks that do not really interest them, even when they know it is important. This makes it look like ADHD is a willpower problem, but that is not the case.4

Can a person be smart and still have ADHD?

Yes, ADHD has nothing to do with how smart a person is. Some individuals with ADHD have very high IQ scores, others score in the average range, and others score much lower. Often individuals with ADHD who are very bright are not recognized as being impaired with ADHD symptoms. Teachers and parents and clinicians often think they are just being lazy or unmotivated or bored.
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Old 01-08-11, 10:51 PM
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Re: Diagnosis Resource Info

This is totally me. Medication helps, being a single parent is hard. What I don't understand is why I feel it is often controversial. Is it due to the medication used to treat it?
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