ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community  

Go Back   ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community > ADULTS AND ADD/ADHD > Adults with ADD > General ADD Talk
Register Blogs FAQ Chat Members List Calendar Donate Gallery Arcade Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-01-05, 08:43 PM
Nova's Avatar
Nova Nova is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Here!
Posts: 3,669
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 19
Thanked 140 Times in 62 Posts
Nova has a spectacular aura aboutNova has a spectacular aura about
Can you hear the flower sing? Issues for gifted adults

http://www.gt-cybersource.org/Articl...aspx?rid=11515




Can you hear the flower sing? Issues for gifted adults

Author(s): Lovecky, D.
Source: Journal of Counseling and Development May 1986

  • There has been comparatively little focus in the literature on the characteristics and social and emotional needs of gifted adults. Using observational data, the author attempts to delineate some of the positive and negative social effects of traits displayed by gifted adults. Five traits (divergency, excitability, sensitivity, perceptivity, and entelechy) seem to produce potential interpersonal and intrapersonal conflict. Unless gifted adults learn to value themselves and find support, identity conflicts and depression may result. Emphasis on self-growth through knowing and accepting self leads to the discovery of sources of personal power. Nurturing relationships through realistic expectations and learning to share oneself provides a supportive environment in which gifted adults can grow and flourish.

Although the personality traits and social and emotional needs of gifted children have been widely described (Erlich, 1982; Terman, 1925; Torrance, 1962; Webb, Meckstroth, & Tolan, 1982), there has been comparatively little focus on gifted adults. Numerous longitudinal studies have indicated that the early advantage experienced by gifted children continues into adulthood and that gifted children become adults of superior vocational achievement, generally satisfied with themselves and their lives (Oden, 1968; Terman & Oden, 1947,1959). Nevertheless, by age 62, most gifted men have experienced the same dissatisfactions with family life as have most people (R.R. Sears, 1977). The gifted women reported to be happiest have been those with the best coping skills, which are dependent on early experience (P.S. Sears & Barbee, 1977). In fact, the effects of early experience, particularly in terms of early educational advantage, seem to be one of the most important contributory factors in later adult achievement (Bloom, 1964; Oden, 1968; Terman, 1925).

In studies of male scientists (Roe, 1952), creative artists and writers (Cattell, 1971), female mathematicians (Helson, 1971), and architects (MacKinnon, 1962), among others, the predominant characteristics found included impulsivity, curiosity, high need for independence, high energy level, introversion, intuitiveness, emotional sensitivity, and nonconformity.

For the most part, the literature on gifted adults does not address the social impact of the various traits described. Piechowski and Colangelo (1984) indicated that certain modes of mental functioning are not socially valued because their expression causes discomfort in others. These traits were termed overexcitabilities, that is, wider and more intense experiences in psychomotor, sensual, intellectual, imaginational, and emotional areas. Gifted adults seem to be characterized by imaginational, intellectual, and emotional overexcitabilities.

In this article I attempt to delineate some of the social aspects (both positive and negative) of traits displayed by gifted adults. I selected gifted adults from among my colleagues, acquaintances, friends, and psychotherapy clients. Of the 15 gifted adults included, 6 were therapy clients. There were 8 women and 7 men ranging in age from 20 to 79. Of these, 6 were doctoral-level professionals, 4 were master's-level professionals, and 3 were students. Fields of endeavor included the social sciences, education, medicine, the biological sciences, business and computers, art, literature, and history. Identification of giftedness was based on a variety of criteria, including identification of giftedness in childhood, memory of scores on achievement or IQ tests, SAT scores, current professional achievement, or attainment of national recognition for achievement.

Using anecdotal and observational material as a basis, I describe five traits that seem to be present in gifted adults and that seem to be central features of their giftedness. The goal is to generate a group of hypotheses about gifted adults and their interactions with others. Further explorations of these preliminary ideas, using more refined research methodology, will undoubtedly provide a more elaborate explanation of the impact of giftedness on the lives of those concerned.

Characteristics of Gifted Adults
There seem to be five traits that produce potential interpersonal and intrapersonal conflict: divergency, excitability, sensitivity, perceptivity, and entelechy. The first three traits have been derived from Torrance's (1961, 1962, 1965) descriptions of creatively gifted children. The last two traits were developed from discussions with gifted adults. These traits seem to be an integral part of giftedness; however, the behavioral manifestations of these traits may vary depending on other physiological and personality factors, such as tolerance for ambiguity, degree of introversion or extroversion, and preference for particular types of sensory input. Gifted adults may exhibit several of the traits. The gifted adults who served as a basis for this article all exhibited at least three (divergency, excitability, and sensitivity).

Although the traits in themselves are neutral, their behavioral manifestations make them socially and emotionally significant. For example, the trait of sensitivity can be manifested as empathy, commitment, touchiness, intensity, or vulnerability. Thus, in any individual, the sum of the behavioral manifestations may be viewed as positive or negative.

Trait Descriptions
Divergency. A preference for unusual, original, and creative responses is characteristic of divergent thinkers. The positive side of the trait includes people who are often high achievers, innovative in a number of fields, task committed, self-starters, and highly independent. Many theoretical scientists, writers, artists, composers, and philosophers are divergent thinkers. Einstein, Freud, and the French impressionists are examples of gifted adults successful in using their divergent thinking ability.

Divergent thinking has positive social and emotional value. Gifted adults possessing this trait are able to find creative solutions to a wide variety of problems, including interpersonal problems, and are able to see several aspects of any situation. In an organization, they are often the "idea" people who bring challenge and enthusiasm to others. They find deep personal satisfaction in the development of new ideas. Divergent thinkers challenge stereotypes. Socially, they bring color to the lives of others, who may use their example to find the courage to break the bonds of conformity and decrease the effects of prejudice.

On the negative side, divergent thinkers encounter difficulty in situations in which group consensus is important. They are often dedicated to their own ideas and find it difficult to support ideas they find foolish. The usual rewards may not motivate divergent thinkers. In fact, they may ignore a reward system imposed by others to work on their own. In social situations, divergent thinkers may not fit in. Common social rules, such as not criticizing others publicly or not disagreeing with one perceived by the majority to be influential, may be disregarded. The dilemma of the divergent thinker is one of maintaining identity in the face of pressure to conform. A highly divergent thinker is often a minority of one. If no one else hears the flowers singing, the divergent thinker may experience alienation and eventually an existential depression.

Excitability. High energy level, emotional reactivity, and high nervous system arousal characterize the trait of excitability. Although excitability and hyperactivity may seem to be similar, they are fundamentally different in that gifted adults with the trait of excitability are able to focus their attention and concentration for long periods of time, to use their energy productively in a wide variety of interests, and to do many things well. These gifted adults enjoy the excitement of taking risks and meeting challenges. This risk taking is dissimilar to that found in mania or impulsivity in that the gifted adult (a) is aware of the consequences of the risk, (b) takes risks in the form of challenges rather than reckless activities, and (c) knows when to stop.

The high energy level of these gifted adults allows them to produce prodigiously in whatever most captures their interest. They often pave the way for others to follow with refinements of their innovative ideas. Many inventors and entrepreneurs have the trait of excitability. Thomas Edison and Leonardo da Vinci are examples of people who possessed this trait.

The trait of excitability has positive social and emotional value. Productivity and risk taking create new ideas and innovations. There is energy to spend on a variety of projects and personal concerns without the necessity of choosing whether to expend energy on work or self. Finally, these gifted adults know their feelings, act on the basis of these feelings, and are unafraid of the appropriate expression of feelings.

On the negative side, gifted adults with this trait may find it difficult to self-regulate. Boredom and the need for stimulation can produce a habit of constant activity. Some gifted adults may be unable to follow through on projects because they crave novelty. A cycle of high interest and activity for a new venture, followed by loss of interest when the novelty decreases and details must be addressed, can leave others feeling frustrated and angry. In addition, some gifted adults may feel little satisfaction with what has been achieved. Their dilemma is one of always doing but feeling little gratification because others often reap the rewards accruing from the long-term development of their initial ideas. A chronic depression that triggers more activity may be the result. These gifted adults may know that the flowers sing but may never have a chance to enjoy them.

Sensitivity. A depth of feeling that results in a sense of identification with others characterizes the trait of sensitivity. Gifted people form deep attachments and react to the feeling tone of situations; they think with their feelings. People who are highly sensitive make commitments to other people and to social causes. They can be enthusiastic and intensely single-minded about their dedication. Poets, Investigative reporters, Peace Corps workers, and political and religious leaders are often gifted in sensitivity. Examples of such people include St. Francis of Assisi, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emily Dickinson, Ghandi, Martin Luther King, and Virginia Wolff.

People gifted with the trait of sensitivity find positive social and emotional benefit in their deep concern for the needs and rights of others, their empathy for the feelings of others, and their desire to help even at significant cost to themselves. These gifted adults may be unusually aware of the feeling tone of situations and of the more sensual aspects of the environment, such as color and shading. They are often aware of their own shortcomings. Some gifted adults feel a sense of unity with the cosmos, an experience of a universal sharing of self. Adults gifted with sensitivity tend to be highly moral people concerned with giving and with doing what is right for others.

On the negative side, these gifted adults may not understand that others do not feel so deeply or intensely or that others may have different priorities. They may be very intolerant of the needs of others when they perceive those needs to be superficial.

Adults gifted in sensitivity may be so sensitive that others may hesitate to share problems with them. In fact, other people may believe that the gifted adult experiences their pain more intensely than they do, and they may feel robbed of their own feelings. These gifted adults must learn to guard their vulnerability while still remaining sensitive to others, to continue caring in the face of rejection, and to moderate emotional responsiveness so that they feel "with" rather than "for." The risk is that they will become isolates who avoid relationships that could nurture them. They hear the flowers singing, feel a unity with the universe, and want everyone else to hear the song as well.

Perceptivity. An ability to view several aspects of a situation simultaneously, to understand several layers of self within another, and to see quickly to the core of an issue are characteristic of the trait of perceptivity. These gifted adults are able to understand the meaning of personal symbols and to see beyond the superficiality of a situation to the person beneath. Skilled at understanding motivations, they may be able to help others to understand themselves. Adults gifted with perceptivity are those who can hear the flowers singing within others not yet aware of their own gifts. Their intuition and ability to understand several layers of feeling simultaneously help them to assess people and situations rapidly. In fact, they are often skilled at sensing the incongruency between exhibited social facades and real thoughts and feelings. Another aspect of perceptivity concerns the recognition of and need for truth. Social facades displayed by others may seem to this gifted adult to be a sort of lie. Adults gifted in this way detect and dislike falsehood and hypocrisy.

People who are gifted at "seeing" often seem to have a touch of magic about them. Religious and political leaders, philosophers, creative therapists, writers, and poets may be especially gifted with perceptivity. Jane Austen, Langston Hughes, Anne Hutchinson, William Shakespeare, and Henry David Thoreau are all examples.

Positive social and emotional correlates of the trait of perceptivity include the ability of these gifted adults to view their own behavior somewhat objectively, to assess their own as well as others' motivations, and to base their responses on perceptions of underlying dynamics. They are aware not only of what their own needs are but also of the necessity of avoiding internal stress by learning to use their perceptions to know what they truly want. Often, they will decide to do what is best for themselves despite the disapproval of others.

On the negative side, this trait can present difficulties in interpersonal relationships because others, unaware of what the gifted adult sees so clearly, feel both vulnerable and threatened. For the gifted adult, seeing several layers of a person may be confusing. It may be difficult to pair the response obtained with what the situation seemed to indicate was required. The more discrepancy between the inner self and outer face, the more uncomfortable the gifted adult may feel.

The dilemma of this gifted adult is whether to hide the insights and respond superficially to the social facade or to use the gift and risk rejection. Either course may produce constraint and difficulty with spontaneity. Finding interpersonal support is a major priority for these gifted adults; the risk is fear of closeness and intimacy.

Entelechy. From the Greek word for having a goal, entelechy bespeaks a particular type of motivation, inner strength, and vital force directing life and growth to become all the self is capable of being. Adults gifted in entelechy are highly attractive to others who feel drawn to openness, warmth, and closeness. Being near someone with this trait gives others hope and motivation to achieve their own self-actualization. Teachers, therapists, physicians, and social reformers may be among those so gifted. Examples include Helen Keller, Carl Rogers, and Eleanor Roosevelt.

People gifted in entelechy bring deep feelings to a relationship. By spontaneously expressing feelings, they encourage others to do so as well. Their example of overcoming obstacles and their continuing support and interest encourage others to grow. They not only hear the flowers singing but invite others to hear them too.

People gifted in entelechy are capable of creating "golden moments" of friendship, those special times when two people are truly their best selves and able to share on a deep level (N. Jenckes, personal communication, December 26, 1984). Gifted adults may find sources of rare intimacy; however, they may also find an overwhelming number of people who want contact but have little to offer in return. They may feel vulnerable to and intruded on by the demands of others who may feel cheated that the promise implied in the initial sharing cannot continue. The dilemma of these gifted adults is to find ways to nurture the self through others while avoiding the expenditure of vital personal resources on others' needs. The risk is anxiety about requests from others and avoidance of closeness in interpersonal relationships.

Options For Self Growth
The five traits described may lead to crises; gifted adults continuously face choices that seem to lead either to denial of gifts or rejection by others. Unless they learn to value self and find support from others, these adults will experience identity crises whenever the conflict resurfaces. This process entraps creative energy, which is then lost to creative production.

Gifted adults can learn to deal creatively with their conflicts. Although many use the resources of psychotherapy, one of the primary traits of adult giftedness is a need for independence. Thus, they may wish to find their own unique ways to nurture themselves and to develop supportive relationships. Some options to be considered might include the following.

Nurturing the Self
Knowing and loving all aspects of oneself enables one to find and use sources of personal power.

Knowing oneself. Discovering personal symbols can help gifted people understand and value their insights and intuitions. Personal symbols can be explored in a variety of ways, including daydreaming, analysis of dreams, poetry writing, sketching, and the use of imagery and visualization techniques. Lazarus (1977) described visualization techniques and Moffat and Painter (1974) described the use of journal writing to define and maintain self in a sometimes hostile world.

Accepting oneself. Valuing their uniqueness is necessary for gifted adults in accepting themselves. Valuing and accepting negative traits can be a means of freeing energy to deal creatively with life. If the gifted adult is able to accept faults and vulnerabilities, then the positive sides of these traits can come to light. Energy will not be focused on feeling unhappy about self or on denying faults and failings. Most creativity develops from the energy found in discontent; using discomfort as a sign that creative energy is available allows for the taking charge of self rather than for feeling fated to misfortune.

Finding sources of personal power. Freeing self the constraints that inhibit use of creativity by listening to inner messages is one means of finding personal power. Learning to use loneliness rather than avoiding or fearing it can be an important means of increasing personal power (C.A. Martin, personal communication, June 12, 1984). Many gifted adults are lonely because of a lack of true peers. Feeling comfortable with oneself, having a wide variety of interests, knowing that there are some people who value at least parts of themselves, and viewing lonely times as a chance of further self-care and self-exploration are ways of growing in personal power.

Nurturing Interpersonal Relationships
Having realistic and sensitive expectations for oneself and others and being able to share oneself with others are vital to the development of supportive interpersonal relationships. Gifted adults often have high expectations for themselves and others. Sometimes they forget that other people are not gifted in the ways they are. In fact, gifted adults may need to develop an appreciation for the talents of others. Recognition of others' talents can lead to warm friendships in which different talents can complement each other. The lives of Salieri and Mozart might have been completely different had each been able to value the other.

Understanding the effects of one's giftedness on others entails a realization that the same behaviors may elicit different responses from different people and from the same people at different times. For example, emotional intensity can be energizing at one time but exhausting at another. Different limits may have to be negotiated with individuals (D.K. Baker, personal communication, December 22,1984). Just as sensitive gifted adults may cause others to feel robbed of deep feelings, the anxiety expressed by others may cause the gifted person to feel robbed of the chance to make decisions about the relationship. Learning to set clear boundaries and to negotiate particular limits on giving, expenditure of time and energy, and individual needs for distance and expression of uniqueness can help gifted adults feel some sense of choice in a relationship.

Because of their inner depth and complexity, gifted adults may need to find a large number of friends, each of whom can meet some needs and reflect some aspects of self. Gifted adults sometimes expect to share everything with one person and over-look the special relationships that can develop around one interest or one facet of self.

Sharing one's particular gifts with another can be a source of both self-sustenance and connectedness to others. Some gifts are easier to share with individual friends; others may require a larger audience. A special kind of sharing occurs in the writing of poetry, as described by Harrower (1972). She discussed the need to communicate as an integral part of the experience of writing a poem. Writing poetry is a self-enhancing process that occurs by connecting the writer in some new way to other people, it is from this sort of sharing that emotional growth is fostered.

Gifted adults can use their special talents to help others find their own creativity and their own sources of inner power. Finding ways of sharing self can enhance both people in a relationship and bring depth to that relationship as it grows and changes over time.

Conclusion
Gifted adults, perhaps more than any other group, have the potential to achieve a high degree of self-actualization. Despite the problems that being gifted can bring, the positive social and emotional aspects of giftedness can more than compensate for the problems. To continue to hear the flowers singing and to turn visions and dreams to reality throughout an entire lifetime is a goal to be desired by every gifted adult.

__________________
- You don't seem, like a very good Vampire...
What, is it, that you, do?

- I, can bring, you, back, to Life.
-True Blood
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Nova For This Useful Post:
Candeepal (08-09-09), JamalJ (07-12-12), jolly one (04-26-11)
  #2  
Old 10-01-05, 08:51 PM
ms_sunshine's Avatar
ms_sunshine ms_sunshine is offline
ADDvanced Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Ohio, USA
Posts: 1,240
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 7 Posts
ms_sunshine has a spectacular aura aboutms_sunshine has a spectacular aura about
Thanks, Nova. When I'm at work on Monday, I'm going to print this thread out for the director of the gifted program we have for the middle school. Very interesting reading.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-01-05, 09:14 PM
Jaycee's Avatar
Jaycee Jaycee is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 362
Thanks: 9
Thanked 28 Times in 20 Posts
Jaycee has disabled reputation
Cool ...I wonder how many people on the forum actually feel they fit into this? Some of the self actualization traits are definitely me...but I don't have the nervous energy that sometimes a characterizes this group. Hmm I wonder what type of IQ's he was looking at?
This was a fun read. I hear everything sing...used to think that everyone heard music in their heads whether it's a song they've heard or something totally original.
__________________
jan
Everybody is somebody else's wierdo.

Never argue with an idiot. They bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #4  
Old 10-01-05, 09:47 PM
Nova's Avatar
Nova Nova is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Here!
Posts: 3,669
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 19
Thanked 140 Times in 62 Posts
Nova has a spectacular aura aboutNova has a spectacular aura about
Jaycee:
This was a fun read. I hear everything sing...used to think that everyone heard music in their heads whether it's a song they've heard or something totally original.

Yeah...but does food sometimes taste 'blue or red' to you...like I've encountered...
Rhetorical question...LOL!

Nova
__________________
- You don't seem, like a very good Vampire...
What, is it, that you, do?

- I, can bring, you, back, to Life.
-True Blood
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-01-05, 10:13 PM
speedo's Avatar
speedo speedo is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 4,458
Thanks: 54
Thanked 515 Times in 286 Posts
speedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud of
Wonderful post Nova! The info is appreciated by Me
__________________
ADHD.... It's not just for kids anymore...
It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
"Sig personnas illegitum non carborundum." (unknown)
The computer lets you make more mistakes faster, with the exception of tequila and a handgun. (M. Radcliffe)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-01-05, 11:08 PM
mymind mymind is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New York City
Posts: 93
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
mymind is on a distinguished road
This was just the most awesome read, I saw myself in all of it. I was just recently diagnosed, and the more I find out, the more I want to know and the more I am fascinated. This just makes you look on the bright side of our disorder and how special we really are.
Donna
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-02-05, 12:32 AM
Gourmet Gourmet is offline
Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,392
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 8 Posts
Gourmet is on a distinguished road
You're right, that was a fun read! I'm over here feeling all gifted and stuff. LOL
Thanks for sharing
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-02-05, 01:55 AM
Nova's Avatar
Nova Nova is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Here!
Posts: 3,669
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 19
Thanked 140 Times in 62 Posts
Nova has a spectacular aura aboutNova has a spectacular aura about
You're all just being too darn kind !
I love you for it, though....
Rave on !!!
LOL!!
Nova
__________________
- You don't seem, like a very good Vampire...
What, is it, that you, do?

- I, can bring, you, back, to Life.
-True Blood
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-02-05, 03:24 AM
mymkym's Avatar
mymkym mymkym is offline
Jr Member
 

Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
mymkym has disabled reputation
Thank you Nova, That was really interesting to read. And how amazing to hear that some of those aspects can relate to myself and give insights as to some of the reasons others react differently to situations than myself. I am so all new to everything and finding about myself. But so far, i'm starting to understand how different i am from a lot of other people and why i find being alone can be more entertaining then being with others. (I'm a bit of a loner, but i like it). This thread has helped as well. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-02-05, 04:46 AM
beeblebrox beeblebrox is offline
Member
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Germany
Posts: 46
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
beeblebrox is on a distinguished road
After reading this, I can't help but wonder if there is misdiagnosis of adult ADD going on -if profoundly gifted adults are being diagnosed with ADD when they actually do not have it. Mind you, I'm not talking about coexistence.

I wonder if ADD meds would work in the same way on an adult who was not ADD but profoundly gifted and having issues with functioning on a day-to-day level because of it?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-03-05, 02:38 AM
Zippy's Avatar
Zippy Zippy is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Tornado Alley, Texas
Posts: 108
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Zippy is on a distinguished road
Nova, are you following me around today?! You've started two recent posts perfectly parallel to my life.

I had the "little talk" with our company president on Thursday about many of the exact issues mentioned in this article. When "gifted" was included in the laundry list of my diagnosed issues some time ago, I was surprised but didn't really pay much attention as I didn't associate it with my problems or see it in my life at all. Actually, I had my doubts as to the diagnostic accuracy, but to most everyone in my peer circle this was not a revelation at all and seemed common knowledge.

The problem is, I have a great many of the negative characteristics. I've also been informed dysthemia and I have developed a relationship. I let what I perceive as the immorality of others harm my soul, and I shouldn't. For instance, I have real problems with the status quo "this is the way we've always done it" or just plain fear of change. I also can't comprehend greed for some reason. During a company meeting to discuss cuts in wages and personnel as times become lean in business, I suggested effeciency and waste emilination proposals I tabled two years ago. I also suggested the big guys cut their exorbitant salaries rather than cut wages or eliminate jobs of those barlely getting by in our company. That went over like drinking straight from the milk carton. The list of potential conflict issues grows.

Someone explain to me why a lie said with extreme conviction, shouted in an aggressive tone, or told by a wealthy person is perceived as truth, or at least closer to the truth, than if it had been told in an average way by an average person. To me it's just a louder lie.

I wish this were all the issues, but it doesn't scratch the surface. Each issue seems to breed others, so they grow exponentially. Your post has given me new insight as to Thursday's conversation with my boss and inspired personal action for help tomorrow. I thank you for the post and hope you are well. Injustice causes such pain in me and I'm afraid that pain doesn't right the injustice. I would gladly take the pain if the wrongs could be made right, but I'm afraid I don't have that choice.





__________________
Young, they threw me in a deep lake
to teach me to swim.
Now, older and stronger,
I think I'll throw them off a cliff
and teach them to fly.
I'm really getting the hang of this social thing.

--zippy--
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-03-05, 03:05 AM
Nova's Avatar
Nova Nova is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Here!
Posts: 3,669
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 19
Thanked 140 Times in 62 Posts
Nova has a spectacular aura aboutNova has a spectacular aura about
[quote=Zippy]Nova, are you following me around today?! You've started two recent posts perfectly parallel to my life. [quote]


Seek...and ye shall find what thou seeketh....

Nah...we're just being on the same wavelength tonight..is all...
Good to know!
I absolutely love your 'signature' !!!
Nova
__________________
- You don't seem, like a very good Vampire...
What, is it, that you, do?

- I, can bring, you, back, to Life.
-True Blood
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-03-05, 03:09 AM
Nova's Avatar
Nova Nova is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Here!
Posts: 3,669
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 19
Thanked 140 Times in 62 Posts
Nova has a spectacular aura aboutNova has a spectacular aura about
I don't believe it works that way...

Quote:
Originally Posted by beeblebrox
I wonder if ADD meds would work in the same way on an adult who was not ADD but profoundly gifted and having issues with functioning on a day-to-day level because of it?
I can pretty much tell you that they do not. They only work on 'us' with ADD/HD...otherwise you'll have some creative genius', totally flying past you, at a hundred miles an hour..unlike how they slow 'us' down..

I would recommend attending Juliard, instead of Ritalin, for those who aren't ADD/HD, but are gifted.
Nova
__________________
- You don't seem, like a very good Vampire...
What, is it, that you, do?

- I, can bring, you, back, to Life.
-True Blood
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-03-05, 06:04 AM
beeblebrox beeblebrox is offline
Member
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Germany
Posts: 46
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
beeblebrox is on a distinguished road
Ah yes, I forgot that part....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nova
I can pretty much tell you that they do not. They only work on 'us' with ADD/HD...otherwise you'll have some creative genius', totally flying past you, at a hundred miles an hour..unlike how they slow 'us' down..

I would recommend attending Juliard, instead of Ritalin, for those who aren't ADD/HD, but are gifted.
Nova
Now I feel a little reassured. The ADD meds I've been taking for the last six months slow me down and "ground" me, for lack of a better term. I have heard that those who abuse the drug do so to stay up longer to study or drive long distances - that just sounds inconceivable to me.

Anyway - I can see how the two get mixed up. The differences between giftedness and ADD are not as apparent and clear-cut as I once thought they were.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-03-05, 07:21 AM
whiteraven's Avatar
whiteraven whiteraven is offline
ADDvanced Contributor
 

Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 692
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 7 Posts
whiteraven has disabled reputation
This is very interesting...

One of the things that the meds have slowed me down and cleared me up enough to see, is that many people don't make the connections/see the patterns/hear the singing. And they don't like it when you do.
So I am learning to keep my mouth shut and wait for others to see it. Then I feel weird about it, like I am being condescending just by existing.
__________________
~ Stay Calm... Be Brave... Wait for the Signs ~
~from the "Dead Dog Cafe Comedy Hour" by Thomas King~
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD Andi Learning Disabilities (LD) 81 11-18-17 12:41 AM
Reference For Local Doctors Draga Pennsylvania 8 03-21-14 02:31 PM
Reference For Local Doctors Draga Michigan 4 03-25-10 01:38 PM
Reference For Local Doctors Draga Georgia 0 08-07-04 06:48 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums