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Old 07-19-18, 07:02 PM
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Unhappy Managing work and adhd [advice?]

Hello! I was diagnosed within entering elementary school, and i never had treatment (my only known treatment was counseling for odd which didn't last long). I'm 20 now, and living with my boyfriend. I'm within my 3rd job within the customer service section--and it's waitressing. My last 2 jobs were going on a year each but i still made constant mistakes. Now that i'm actually living on my own (in the sense of aware from parents and fending for most of my necessities by myself) the effects of my ADHD are becoming more profound, and it's making work really difficult.


I'v done difficult work, heck my first job was an internship at a popular local eyebrow threading salon so i'm not new to the fast pace work force. It's just difficult--because my coworkers and managers think every mistake i make is from the lack of past waitressing work, new still to the job, not understanding the menu and alcohol, or possibly what they may think of as stupidity. It's embarrassing, and frustrating at times. I'v been held back a section because they thought they needed to train me a bit more somehow, but it's nothing related to my knowledge.

Now that i'm on my own and can try and manage my symptoms, what are some of the things that work for you guys in any of the customer service field, and how do you explain the depths of adhd to coworkers, if you even do?
Should i try and explain it to them?


Unrelated to the topic -- my editing bar is unresponsive, any fixes for that? or is it because i'm still a new member?

Last edited by Quinzella; 07-19-18 at 07:09 PM.. Reason: title was not correct
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Old 07-19-18, 07:06 PM
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Re: M

greetings and welcome!

try to edit now there's about a twenty minute window on editing, i believe. if you miss that, due to being new and your first several posts needing approval before appearing, message a moderator and we can make changes for you.

cheers and, again, welcome!
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Old 07-22-18, 02:57 PM
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Re: Managing work and adhd [advice?]

I worked as a waitress for a year and a half when in graduate school, I only stopped because I finished my studies and moved on.



I should mention that my job was made quite a bit easier in that it was Bonanza, a buffet-style restaurant. People only ordered drinks and sometimes special meals like steak and shrimp. But all the special orders were taken care of when they came in, and I only had to take it to them when ready. MUCH easier than keeping track of people's orders.



But there were other things that I had to keep track of: refilling drinks, taking away dirty dishes, making sure to check that they were enjoying their meal, etc. It was a challenge keeping up with that, especially on busy nights.


I managed best by establishing a steady routine of checking each table in order and making sure each one had whatever they needed. Sometimes it only needed a quick glance to see that they were fine, sometimes I would need to stop and take care of something before moving on to the next table. On busy nights, this meant I was running around constantly, but at least the customers were reasonably well served.


One downside of this routine is that I would sometimes hyperfocus on it so much that I didn't even notice when business had slowed down, and then I almost drove my customers crazy, running around the fairly quiet restaurant and checking on them constantly. It was embarrassing at the time, but it seems funny now, as I look back on it.
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Old 07-22-18, 03:08 PM
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Re: Managing work and adhd [advice?]

Oh, and I wanted to add that if I were you, I wouldn't try to explain the depths of ADHD. Not that you should be ashamed of it, but it's just that there are too many misconceptions about it. People tend to hear "ADHD" and not listen to anything else you say about it, because they think they know about it. Most people just think of little boys who can't sit still in school... not that that is an entirely false impression, it's just that there is far more to ADHD than that.


Instead of saying things like, "This is difficult for me because I have ADHD," you may find it more helpful to just describe the symptoms that are making your work most difficult, and if possible, offer a way that your coworkers can help you. For example, "I tend to be very absent-minded, so I have a hard time remembering things. It helps me if instructions are written down."
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Old 07-22-18, 03:20 PM
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Re: Managing work and adhd [advice?]

Welcome! You will get a ton of good information here!



I was a waitress at several places in my teens and early 20's too. I was not a good one either. Too many moving parts, lots to remember and very fast paced. I was embarrassed and frustrated too but also undiagnosed so I just thought I was stupid or something. I couldn't figure out what I was doing differently from my co-workers. Have you tried meds? Perhaps they will be very helpful for you.



Don't tell your co-workers! 1. They will never get it. 2. It can be held against you.




I understand the lure of money waitressing has but have you thought of another field? I worked as a customer service representative in an inbound call center and even though it had it's challenges, it was better than waitressing for sure! I had insurance and eventually good hours.



Good luck!!
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