ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community  

Go Back   ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community > ADULTS AND ADD/ADHD > Careers/Job Impact
Register Blogs FAQ Chat Members List Calendar Donate Gallery Arcade Mark Forums Read

Careers/Job Impact This forum is for adults to discuss how AD/HD affects work and career.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 05-21-13, 04:23 PM
ADD me's Avatar
ADD me ADD me is offline
ADDvanced Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 1,027
Thanks: 1,159
Thanked 1,079 Times in 569 Posts
ADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud of
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Update to all of the above: I went in to talk to my Dean today about what I thought of as improvements I was able to make in the online teaching, and how with the ADD diagnosis and medication and the months off, etc I would be okay by October, when the next online courses were scheduled without an instructor assigned yet. I was clearly hoping to get one of these, thinking the reason that they were both TBA was that they were looking for one more adjunct, so they could give me either one, depending on the credentials of the person they found.

Well, not so much. Bottom line, they want me to take a year off from teaching there, and then they'd reconsider. My dean has always had my back and is very willing to write me a letter of recommendation, so I do trust him in this.

So . . . All you PhD ADDers out there . . . Know that teaching is far less structured than graduate work, and that it requires some significant executive functions, or at least good copimg strategies and work arounds. Make sure you get some kind of practice teaching with honest feedback, especially if if you've never taught before.

I know each of us is different, and our difficulties and deficits are different. I never had many problems getting the reading assignments done, or even the writing ones. Perhaps some of you who struggled with the reading, will turn out to have more natural gifts as a teacher. And, in point pf fact, I am a very good teacher when i am dealing with people who share an interest in what I am teaching. But that's not always the case with college students.

It turned out to be a real disadvantage that I had never been diagnosed. I don't know if ADA would have helped provide a teaching coach, but I sure wish I'd had one.

Bummer of a day, really.
__________________
ADD me
"Senior diagnosis" of ADHD at age 65
GAD thrown in for good measure, plus some clinical depression -- but then, who wouldn't be depressed, going 60+ years before being diagnosed?
Medication: Short acting generic Adderall; low dose of escitalopram.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ADD me For This Useful Post:
namazu (06-30-13)
  #32  
Old 06-30-13, 11:30 AM
DailyDaydreamer DailyDaydreamer is offline
Newbie
 

Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: WA
Posts: 9
Thanks: 36
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
DailyDaydreamer is on a distinguished road
Arrow Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

I have two master's degrees and thought I was going to die trying to finish them. The thesis piece was especially challenging due to my inattentiveness.

Now, I work in academia and wish I'd never gone into this field. I love being in front of a class teaching and find it very stimulating. However, the required prep time, grading and paper work is a disaster. I find it so boring and have been reminded over and over again by superiors that despite being a brilliant professor with high retention in my classroom, the college's accreditation hinges on excellent documentation. I've been demeaned and humiliated in front of my peers for my poor record keeping.

I've tried teaching online at home where I can set my own hours too. It was terrible because I can't stay on task at home.

Think long and hard now because it's very difficult to go back to school to train in something more suitable once you have tons of financial obligations.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to DailyDaydreamer For This Useful Post:
ADD me (07-13-13)
  #33  
Old 07-17-13, 04:07 PM
MrMostArtistic's Avatar
MrMostArtistic MrMostArtistic is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Athens, OH
Posts: 26
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 8
Thanked 28 Times in 14 Posts
MrMostArtistic will become famous soon enough
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

I just obtained my Master's in Clinical Mental Health Counseling in May. I started to suspect that I have ADHD after a number of executive function issues became more pronounced over the past 2 years. I was interested in pursuing a Ph.D in Counselor Education this Fall, but I decided to postpone continuation of my education because I was intimidated by the research component of doctoral work. I want to establish some structure and discipline in my life before I commit to a Ph.D program. Furthermore, I want to gain counseling experience so I can clarify my research interests and feel more confident about writing a dissertation. I've heard horror stories about dissertation writing, so I want to be absolutely sure I don't get in my way (I'm a master procrastinator) when I decide to make that commitment. I'm thinking I'll be ready after at least a year or two of work. What do you think?
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #34  
Old 07-18-13, 03:08 AM
ADD me's Avatar
ADD me ADD me is offline
ADDvanced Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 1,027
Thanks: 1,159
Thanked 1,079 Times in 569 Posts
ADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud ofADD me has much to be proud of
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMostArtistic View Post
I just obtained my Master's in Clinical Mental Health Counseling in May. I started to suspect that I have ADHD after a number of executive function issues became more pronounced over the past 2 years. I was interested in pursuing a Ph.D in Counselor Education this Fall, but I decided to postpone continuation of my education because I was intimidated by the research component of doctoral work. I want to establish some structure and discipline in my life before I commit to a Ph.D program. Furthermore, I want to gain counseling experience so I can clarify my research interests and feel more confident about writing a dissertation. I've heard horror stories about dissertation writing, so I want to be absolutely sure I don't get in my way (I'm a master procrastinator) when I decide to make that commitment. I'm thinking I'll be ready after at least a year or two of work. What do you think?
Wow, I am impressed. Congratulations.

I know there are counselors w/ ADHD. I don't know about all of them, but I know that there are at least some who specialize in working with people with ADHD.

Have you looked into a D.Psy. program? They are more practice oriented, where research is in support of clinical practice and less "pure" research. The final piece isn't always called a dissertation, but a "project." Fewer teaching opportunities, but surely lots of supervisory work available.

I am curious about one thing. I know counselors need to have a well-developed self-awareness, not just for what's happening within themselves, but how clients perceive them. Since that kind of "objective" self-awareness is difficult for us -- I think I am about a negative 1.5 on a 10-pt scale, alas -- how has this worked out for you? And having sessions videotaped? I think I would need a double Scotch before I would even consider watching!

Not to be nosy about your clinical skills, but if there is anything you could say about this in a more general way, I would be very interested.
__________________
ADD me
"Senior diagnosis" of ADHD at age 65
GAD thrown in for good measure, plus some clinical depression -- but then, who wouldn't be depressed, going 60+ years before being diagnosed?
Medication: Short acting generic Adderall; low dose of escitalopram.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 07-19-13, 01:33 PM
by_design's Avatar
by_design by_design is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: May 2013
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 166
Thanks: 141
Thanked 118 Times in 62 Posts
by_design is a jewel in the roughby_design is a jewel in the roughby_design is a jewel in the rough
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

My form of intellectualism has a strong Aspergers flavor to it. I don't have Aspergers, because it is something that must afflict a person in childhood. It is really hard to find niches where it can fit into NT academics. My choice is to keep it to my personal life, and actually get something done when I am at work. Intellectual interest is something that causes me lots of conflicts in the workplace, so I decide to leave it at home, where I can enjoy it.
__________________
"When you see the price they paid, I'm sure you'll come and join the masquerade" Berlin
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 09-20-13, 10:50 AM
MrMostArtistic's Avatar
MrMostArtistic MrMostArtistic is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Athens, OH
Posts: 26
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 8
Thanked 28 Times in 14 Posts
MrMostArtistic will become famous soon enough
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD me View Post
Wow, I am impressed. Congratulations.

I know there are counselors w/ ADHD. I don't know about all of them, but I know that there are at least some who specialize in working with people with ADHD.

Have you looked into a D.Psy. program? They are more practice oriented, where research is in support of clinical practice and less "pure" research. The final piece isn't always called a dissertation, but a "project." Fewer teaching opportunities, but surely lots of supervisory work available.

I am curious about one thing. I know counselors need to have a well-developed self-awareness, not just for what's happening within themselves, but how clients perceive them. Since that kind of "objective" self-awareness is difficult for us -- I think I am about a negative 1.5 on a 10-pt scale, alas -- how has this worked out for you? And having sessions videotaped? I think I would need a double Scotch before I would even consider watching!

Not to be nosy about your clinical skills, but if there is anything you could say about this in a more general way, I would be very interested.
Sorry for the late response! I've been avoiding this post for what seems like years because I didn't know how to articulate my thoughts, but now I know what I want to say!

As far as self-awareness goes, I'd say I do a pretty good job of monitoring my own thoughts and feelings (both in real-time and in retrospect). I feel like I'm pretty insightful, and I think I have a keen sense of judgment about what other people are feeling as well. With that said, I must give credit to my internship supervisor, because she did an amazing job at helping me to develop and hone these skills. I've always been thoughtful and self-reflective (I journal regularly), but I learned to sharpen my awareness and explore what's beneath the surface through work with my supervisor, which brings me to your second question about watching videos of sessions.

I think it's only natural to have anxiety about being recorded and having to watch yourself on camera, especially in an evaluative setting. Long before I started working with clients, I had fears about saying the wrong things, losing my train of thought, or articulating myself in a way that was "uncounselor-like," and I was even more fearful about having to watch these mishaps with my supervisor. Of course, all of my fears were realized by the time I finished my practicum and internship; however, I learned to bounce back, and I discovered that people were more forgiving and understanding of my "mistakes" than I was. Thankfully, my supervisor was always constructive with her feedback, and she helped me to see what I could have done differently - not what I did "wrong" - which was integral in my development as a trainee.

As I reflect on my practicum and internship experience, I'm actually grateful for those uncomfortable moments watching myself on camera. The awkward silences, the stumbling over my words, and the misjudgments about people's problems were all overshadowed by the progress I could see in myself by the end of the year!

These days, I look forward to watching recordings of my sessions because I don't get the same hands-on supervision I got last year. I'm practicing without training wheels now, so it's important for me to constantly remind myself of what I'm doing well and what I can improve. In a way, watching videos of past sessions is like re-reading old entries from my journal. I get to chart my own growth and development over time, and I gain insight into what's going on between me and the people around me.

Again, sorry for the late response! Hope I've answered your questions!
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 12-17-13, 10:37 PM
AprilLudgate AprilLudgate is offline
Newbie
 

Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
AprilLudgate will become famous soon enough
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD me View Post
I could get caught up in the ideas being discussed, or the material I was presenting -- and lose track of what was happening among the students. College classes are beginning to require the kind of classroom management normally associated with high schools. It can be rugged.
I can identify with this so much. In fact, I found this forum because I was looking for somewhere that I could talk about academia-specific challenges related to my ADHD.

I'm a foreign language TA with my own class. I don't like teaching, I'm not naturally good at it, and I seem to be missing the gene that makes people find teaching rewarding, but I work hard to at least do an adequate job (it's only ethical since I accept paychecks for it and all). I find it impossible to manage the classroom dynamics and misbehavior on top of speaking a foreign language and delivering my lesson, so I just don't and ignore it instead. I don't really care if students don't want to pay attention or participate but I do feel bad for the students that are distracted by them -- I just don't know if there's anything I can do about it without compromising the quality of my lesson. We are also told that we should be super enthusiastic and engaging in the classroom, but I also don't have the attentiveness left to concentrate on staying in my fake personality (I'm naturally funny in a dry, sarcastic way, but otherwise pretty serious and reserved - aka "boring" in the view of people who think a teacher needs to be an entertainer).

The #1 hardest thing for me is grading student presentations. I am so bad at this that I have sometimes felt like ethically, I needed to tell the supervising prof - but I'm not sure what good this could do and I am not "out" about my ADHD in the department. There's no way that I can keep up with how many grammar or pronunciation errors a student makes, the variety of grammar and vocabulary that they use, and the content of their presentation all at the same time. I compensate by being an incredibly easy grader so that if I'm inconsistent in how many points I take off for each category, at it's only a matter of 1-3 points.

Another thing that I struggle with is the general idea that grad students should be happily overworked, frazzled with stress, and sleep-deprived -- to refuse to go into that state for your work is to be undedicated. To stay sane and productive, I need 9 hours of sleep, exercise, and some mental downtime (watching dumb TV or surfing the web) in my day -- obviously I'll miss one or two on some days but I need all of these things regularly to not be miserable. I've made sacrifices in my personal life to make this work for me (like having any social life at all, spending weekends doing a lot of household chores and food prep that I can't get to during the week) but sometimes sacrifices have to come from work-life too. Right now Iím at my maximum with teaching and classes (I usually try to avoid this but it wasn't possible this year) so when a professor makes a comment about how we should be attending these weekend events (that relate to my teaching but not my degree or future plans) or taking on as much outside of class as possible, I donít even know what to say. I feel like trying to manage with my current courseload is a house of cards right now and if I try to pile on anything else it will all crumble (my physical/mental health, my productivity, my grades). You canít tell a professor (or another student for that matter, without being judged) ďI need my Saturdays for personal businessĒ or ďI need 9 hours of sleep per nightĒ in grad school.


I do find classes fairly easy. There have been some miserable nights because I couldn't focus on my paper until I had that last minute adrenaline rush (and the subsequent regret when I realize all the interesting things I could have explored if I had more time), but my grades are fine. Writing and test-taking happen to be two of my greatest skills, so I've always managed to do okay in school even with abysmal work habits. I also don't plan to stay in academia so there's a light at the end of the tunnel. I'm on a professional track in an MA program pursuing a field which will allow me to be self-employed, work remotely, and avoid the things I find most exhausting (lengthy social interaction, mandatory multi-tasking -- I love multi-tasking as much as the next ADHDer but for me it's like an escape mechanism, I switch between tasks to avoid the cognitive discomfort of actually focusing on something and don't actually get anything done).
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-03-14, 09:51 AM
faller faller is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 54
Thanks: 21
Thanked 24 Times in 18 Posts
faller is on a distinguished road
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMostArtistic View Post
I just obtained my Master's in Clinical Mental Health Counseling in May. I started to suspect that I have ADHD after a number of executive function issues became more pronounced over the past 2 years. I was interested in pursuing a Ph.D in Counselor Education this Fall, but I decided to postpone continuation of my education because I was intimidated by the research component of doctoral work. I want to establish some structure and discipline in my life before I commit to a Ph.D program. Furthermore, I want to gain counseling experience so I can clarify my research interests and feel more confident about writing a dissertation. I've heard horror stories about dissertation writing, so I want to be absolutely sure I don't get in my way (I'm a master procrastinator) when I decide to make that commitment. I'm thinking I'll be ready after at least a year or two of work. What do you think?
I got diagnosed because of inability to focus on writing my PhD dissertation (biomedical science). For me and my field the research is the fun part. The dissertation SUCKED. I know the material, had the references but had trouble splicing everything together and COULD NOT MAKE MYSELF WORK ON IT. So yes, the dissertation is hard should you go that route. It is not impossible though.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-03-14, 10:35 AM
Fuzzy12's Avatar
Fuzzy12 Fuzzy12 is online now
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: UK
Posts: 19,665
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 32,002
Thanked 29,572 Times in 13,634 Posts
Fuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond reputeFuzzy12 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by faller View Post
I got diagnosed because of inability to focus on writing my PhD dissertation (biomedical science). For me and my field the research is the fun part. The dissertation SUCKED. I know the material, had the references but had trouble splicing everything together and COULD NOT MAKE MYSELF WORK ON IT. So yes, the dissertation is hard should you go that route. It is not impossible though.
For me, the research part was fun too. What I liked was researching my topic and generating new ideas. I sucked at implementing them though. I usually spent about a day coming up with a brilliant new idea and then months of doing nothing when I was supposed to implement it.

Writing the thesis though was definitely the worst part.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-03-14, 12:44 PM
faller faller is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 54
Thanks: 21
Thanked 24 Times in 18 Posts
faller is on a distinguished road
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Fuzzy- sorry if I missed it, but what field are you in?
One of the guys I used to work with (undiagnosed but clearly ADHD and he knows it) would come up with an idea and by the time the supplies came in for him to run the experiment he had lost interest. I tend to have too many things going at once and make mistakes.
Looks like teaching is a big hangup here. I remember reading somewhere else about a teacher (I assume high school or grade school) struggling also. I think teaching might be one of the less-good fits for ADHD people.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 04-01-18, 11:25 PM
shanita shanita is offline
Newbie
 

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: TX
Posts: 3
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
shanita is on a distinguished road
Re: ADD/ADHD in academia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisPerson View Post
Iím relieved to find this discussion for no other reason than it confirms that other academics do indeed function while having ADD Ė moreover, that academics with ADD actually exist! My diagnosis came after completing my PhD and after Iíd gotten tenure; throughout my graduate years Iíd coped by self-medicating with alcohol and a variety of other substances. Iím certain that it didnít help affairs in the slightest. That stage of my life is, thankfully, now over; I would never want to repeat it Ė or advise anyone to replicate it.

I suppose one of the things that has been gnawing at me over the years is the idea that someone with ADD should somehow not be in academia; that being an academic while having ADD is perhaps something that can be done, but probably shouldnít be done. (Perhaps akin to the idea that a skinny, tall person might perhaps be able to make it as a professional bodybuilder, but that another sport, like basketball, would suit their physiology somewhat better.) Indeed, Iíve even had the idea that if Iíd chosen a different career path, medication would prove to be unnecessary Ė and perhaps that my previous bouts of alcohol and substance abuse would not have eventuated. Of course, I realise that these thoughts, especially the latter Ė while not quite science fiction Ė are perhaps insufficiently grounded in reality. Regardless, they are present sometimes.

To clarify things somewhat, I have to state that Iíve been successful in academia (-Iím in the Humanities / philosophy): having only been in the profession for a relatively short period of time (Iím 35 years old), Iíve published consistently in ďgoodĒ journals, and even had widely-reviewed a book come out last year with an international publisher. Because of all of this, Iíve also been a visiting fellow at some prestigious institutions. (Iím not relating any of this for the sake of my ego Ė at least as far as Iím aware; Iím merely trying to convey some picture of who I am and where Iím at.)

But despite my relative success, sometimes, however, it seems like too much of a struggle: the unstructured work environment and the nature of the work itself appear to intermittently overwhelm me. Iím not sure if I have much advice to give to others, therefore; Iím even unsure if I have any questions that I feel like I need addressing Ė although Iím sure I will at some point. I just thought Iíd post this to express my relief at finding this thread. Much thanks.

Chris
This is so longer after any of these posts, but I'm a professor on the tenure track in the humanities, and was just diagnosed with ADHD. I'm in disbelief that I've had this all my life, suffered in my relationship to work for so long, and had no idea. Now, I'm in the 4th year at my job and hopeful about being able to be more productive now that I know, and also frustrated at already being being and wishing I had found out before getting started on the tenure track.

I can't help wondering for others who are already employed in academia, if you've ever had any accommodations as professors? I know all about these things for my students, but I wonder the extent to which this is ever addressed for us. Chris, you mentioned being a professor so I thought I'd see if you had any experience or knowledge with regards to this.

Thanks all! so glad to find this forum...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Drugs are not the only solution to treat ADD/ADHD ... there are other options zz123zz ADD News 12 12-20-07 10:18 PM
Top patient-rated ADD/ADHD treatments bhodges Tech Solutions 12 05-04-07 04:09 PM
Do your kids have ADD/ADHD? tinkerbelle Women with ADD/ADHD 34 01-18-07 10:59 AM
Teach and Reach Students With Attention Deficit Disorders Andi Teacher's Corner 4 03-16-06 01:55 PM
ADD/ADHD Families? Gidget General ADD Talk 7 03-22-04 12:49 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums