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Old 07-03-13, 02:55 AM
sados420 sados420 is offline
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Post Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

I was diagnosed with ADD at about age 15 but after taking bupropion, I stopped seeing my therapist.

I am 24 now and trying to get back to the life I should be able to live.


So while I should have been working today, I started jotting down things I do that may be something to bring up to a Psychiatrist. I figure if there are some undiagnosed (or perhaps semi-diagnosed, like myself) like me out there we could benefit by sharing what we believe to be possible symptoms of warning signs and others already diagnosed could share if they have similar symptoms and if they have been told anything relevant to said symptoms by their therapists.

My list (as "in-progress" as anything else in my life) as follows
  1. Zoning into conversations overheard nearby, stopping everything to imagine the conversation. If the conversation is faint finishing it in your head.
  2. Random movements of the legs and or hands - shaking both legs/bounciness in my chair (at work for example) all the time, everyday - I've seen videos of myself and it makes me extremely sad and embarassed to see what I look like doing things like this. Afraid my coworkers will see me and think badly of me
  3. Picking at my lips and nails 24/7
  4. When having a conversation with someone, constantly touching my chin, walking around as if I've got somewhere to be, staring at things around the room, it makes people think I'm not paying attention to them but I just can't look at them and listen. I find even that looking around at other things and moving around may help me focus more on what they're actually saying to me
  5. Fixate on certain things in conversations which stand out to me. Fixate on said things to the point of re-routing the conversation or a complete change in topic, leaving people I speak to wondering where the detour happened.
  6. Forgetting things. It may seem pretty general, but even forgetting things I paid for at the self check-out and leaving the store completely empty handed. Or never being able to find anything in my house, even causing a conflict with my girlfriend because I end up blaming her for putting things where they belong, instead of the strange places in which I leave things.
  7. I clock-in at work at my computer, in my office. I get there 15-20 minutes early and sit down, because if I don't I'll be late (it's either of the two extremes with me) - but here's the kicker - Every day for 3 months that I've been there I've forgotten to punch in on time - Thankfully people have seen me and could vouch for me so far, but it's embarassing.
  8. Forgetting to change passwords, make extra keys, do laundry, iron my clothes, preparing lunch. I'll think I have everything set up everytime and I always forget half of the things I'm supposed to do on my daily routines. People think I'm unprepared or just dumb, but I make an honest effort to do what I have to do, and it always ends up being half done.
  9. Always being at a loss for words when someone approaches me to talk. I'll be thinking about some random stupid thing, playing out scenarios in my head, or thinking of the next "big idea". End up mumbling back at them, or looking extremely surprised when they talk to me. Once I catch on to the topic and wrap my mind around it I can be fairly articulate.

I'll add more as more occurs to me, but I encourage others undiagnosed or not to post big warning signs they see in their lives.

Thank you!
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Old 07-03-13, 06:14 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

You were diagnosed at 15, so this diagnosis should help you know, although some docs think that you "outgrow" ADHD in adulthood.

I am also an early person as I am terrified of being late. I can never be "on time". I struggle with the timing, I donīt know when to start getting ready or when to leave (even though I know how long it takes to get there). So I always leave extra early so I have time to go for a coffee and a few ciggies before.
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Old 07-03-13, 07:19 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

Wow, you did a great job describing the symptoms. It was like you were writing down the thoughts in my head on paper. I fall into the category of all the things you listed when I'm not medicated! I was diagnosed at 6 years old and for me it was easy because I was so severe there was never a question that I was AD(H)D.

I thought I grew out of it going into adult hood. I was wrong. I went through some real difficult years because I wasn't taking medication.
Some people may be able to stop taking them and do okay, I'm just not one of those people.

The good news is that I have conquered and learned to decrease and eliminate most of the things you listed. It does take discipline, structure, sacrifice, determination and effort, but it is possible to live happy with this disorder.

Warning signs;
Have difficulty getting organized
When given a task, I usually procrastinate rather than doing it right away
I work on a lot of projects, but can't seem to complete most of them
Make decisions and act on them impulsively
Get bored real easy
Get distracted easily during ocnversations
Get so focused on one thing that everything else gets pushed aside, no matter how important
Need constant and immediate stimulation
Talk out loud and interrupt without thinking first
Depression, low self esteem, anxiety, feeling like I'm from another planet
I would rather do things my way than to follow the rules
Become very frustrated over simple things.
Difficulty folowing simple instructions and directions

This was me unmedicated and undisciplined. I respect and embrace my disorder. I may have AD(H)D, but I no longer suffer from it!

"They use to laugh at me because I was different, now I laugh at them because they are the same!"
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Old 07-03-13, 07:53 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

Wow this describes me perfectly!!!! My CPN was hinting about this last time I seen her, all the symptoms match, I'm completely new to the idea of having ADHD bad know extremely little about it, thanks for your post
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Old 07-03-13, 10:22 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

[quote=sados420;1506941]I was diagnosed with ADD at about age 15 but after taking bupropion, I stopped seeing my therapist.

I am 24 now and trying to get back to the life I should be able to live.


So while I should have been working today, I started jotting down things I do that may be something to bring up to a Psychiatrist. I figure if there are some undiagnosed (or perhaps semi-diagnosed, like myself) like me out there we could benefit by sharing what we believe to be possible symptoms of warning signs and others already diagnosed could share if they have similar symptoms and if they have been told anything relevant to said symptoms by their therapists. /[quote]

Sados, Welcome!

You are not "semi diagnosed." You were diagnosed at 15, and, assuming the diagnosis was correct, you still have ADHD, because you have had it all your life, and you will have it for the rest of your life.

You didn't say how old you were when you stopped taking the medication, but I would guess about 18 or 19? Being "different" is difficult enough for any teenager, but getting a diagnosis at age 15 and being put on medication could have made you feel worse in some ways, even if it improved your behavior and your grades and made you feel better in those ways.

I saw lots of freshmen in college who had been on medication and had accommodations in high school, but then decided that they didn't want that in college, so they stopped their meds and didn't register with the appropriate office at the college for special accommodations.

Whether or not that is your story, congratulations for making it to 24, and now congratulations for recognizing what's happening and taking steps to get help.
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Old 07-03-13, 10:24 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

Quote:
Originally Posted by sados420 View Post
I was diagnosed with ADD at about age 15 but after taking bupropion, I stopped seeing my therapist.

I am 24 now and trying to get back to the life I should be able to live.


So while I should have been working today, I started jotting down things I do that may be something to bring up to a Psychiatrist. I figure if there are some undiagnosed (or perhaps semi-diagnosed, like myself) like me out there we could benefit by sharing what we believe to be possible symptoms of warning signs and others already diagnosed could share if they have similar symptoms and if they have been told anything relevant to said symptoms by their therapists.
Sados, Welcome!

You are not "semi diagnosed." You were diagnosed at 15, and, assuming the diagnosis was correct, you still have ADHD, because you have had it all your life, and you will have it for the rest of your life.

You didn't say how old you were when you stopped taking the medication, but I would guess about 18 or 19? Being "different" is difficult enough for any teenager, but getting a diagnosis at age 15 and being put on medication could have made you feel worse in some ways, even if it improved your behavior and your grades and made you feel better in those ways.

I saw lots of freshmen in college who had been on medication and had accommodations in high school, but then decided that they didn't want that in college, so they stopped their meds and didn't register with the appropriate office at the college for special accommodations.

Whether or not that is your story, congratulations for making it to 24, and now congratulations for recognizing what's happening and taking steps to get help.
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GAD thrown in for good measure, plus some clinical depression -- but then, who wouldn't be depressed, going 60+ years before being diagnosed?
Medication: Short acting generic Adderall; low dose of escitalopram.
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Old 07-03-13, 11:09 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

These bunch of traits is so adhd and it's just true that the more you know you have ADHD you also have to KNOW that people are self conscious or self centered more than not and 'they' probably don't even notice what you are excruciatingly aware of - and once you get that folks are more interested in themselves you'll relax.

I tell this to my teen son all the time. Self consciousness is a good thing but taken too far it becomes a paralysing thing. Don't let a gift of sensitivity turn into a monster. Likewise, don't let the negative traits of ADHD minimize your positive traits as a living breathing and evolving person!!

Smile - it uses muscles - helps release good feeling body stuff LOL and it's proven when you smile through even the severe pain you are handling an awful situation from your own internal controls you do start to feel 'better' - just because you have ADHD doesn't mean you're not going to have 'negative traits' and i think our 'negative traits' are outweighed by positive ones.

I'd rather list the traits of ADHD that are or can be uniquely an asset to the world! But, i'm a optimist at the moment lol
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Old 07-03-13, 04:03 PM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD me View Post
Sados, Welcome!

You are not "semi diagnosed." You were diagnosed at 15, and, assuming the diagnosis was correct, you still have ADHD, because you have had it all your life, and you will have it for the rest of your life.

You didn't say how old you were when you stopped taking the medication, but I would guess about 18 or 19? Being "different" is difficult enough for any teenager, but getting a diagnosis at age 15 and being put on medication could have made you feel worse in some ways, even if it improved your behavior and your grades and made you feel better in those ways.

I saw lots of freshmen in college who had been on medication and had accommodations in high school, but then decided that they didn't want that in college, so they stopped their meds and didn't register with the appropriate office at the college for special accommodations.

Whether or not that is your story, congratulations for making it to 24, and now congratulations for recognizing what's happening and taking steps to get help.
I suppose you're right, but I don't want to go into an evaluation thinking I know what I have, because I'm just as clueless as I was when I was 15.

I stopped taking my medication at age 16, I took bupropion 75mg twice a day, 2 pills a day (300mg a day) and then was raised to two 200mg extended release pills a day. Neither seemed to do much other than give me stomach discomfort and at times make me feel very uninterested in anything. I took the first dosage for around 5 months until my doctor changed it, and took the second dosage for about 8 months until I decided I didn't like it, and I was at a stage in my life where I thought I knew everything and didn't want to trust the doctor to tell me how I felt or needed to feel.

I only completed one semester of college, I could not stick to anything for the life of me. That's also why I'm in a big rush to feel better, I want to do so much and I just don't know if I can the way I currently am.

I hope with some effort, and some learning and a bit of help from a Psychiatrist/Therapist I can do all I want to do.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanched Dubois View Post
These bunch of traits is so adhd and it's just true that the more you know you have ADHD you also have to KNOW that people are self conscious or self centered more than not and 'they' probably don't even notice what you are excruciatingly aware of - and once you get that folks are more interested in themselves you'll relax.

I tell this to my teen son all the time. Self consciousness is a good thing but taken too far it becomes a paralysing thing. Don't let a gift of sensitivity turn into a monster. Likewise, don't let the negative traits of ADHD minimize your positive traits as a living breathing and evolving person!!

Smile - it uses muscles - helps release good feeling body stuff LOL and it's proven when you smile through even the severe pain you are handling an awful situation from your own internal controls you do start to feel 'better' - just because you have ADHD doesn't mean you're not going to have 'negative traits' and i think our 'negative traits' are outweighed by positive ones.

I'd rather list the traits of ADHD that are or can be uniquely an asset to the world! But, i'm a optimist at the moment lol
Yeah, I do admit that I might be the harshest critic in terms of the things which embarass me about ADHD. But at the same time, I think there's no way people don't notice, and it might be one of the biggest factors pushing me to see a doctor again.

I'm generally a pretty happy and social person, but when I dwell on it it does get me down, I could definitely work on being happier. I think it'll come a lot easier when these problems are under control though.

Thank you for the optimism, I can only hope it rubs off on me.
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Old 03-10-14, 02:24 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

It's Said that when you become an adult, you learn to think about what you say. Untreated ad/hd: I have learned to think about what I say, but only whether I should say it or not. I don't change it or have more tact. If I didn't blurt out already, I sit there a few seconds and wonder if I should say something and usually end up saying it.

Undiagnosed ad/hd I'm 23 and male and sure I have it. I have like Einstein level IQ. But I write in run on sentences or make grammar mistakes on purpose because its just easier or easier to let thoughts flow out that way when writing and fix it later depending on how formal it is. Like I don't worry about fixing it here as I would on other forums Lol.

It was easy for me to ace tests through high school. The more indecent and responsible an adult I need to get, the more my ad/hd has been shown to me. Only now, that it's in plain sight, has the road been shown to me. I moved in with some good friends, I moved out eight months later when they ended up basically hating me and they were still friends but they like despised me. And it happened again, I moved out and in with another friend. Both times they were complaining about picking up my slack. Now I'm back home, and my parents pick up my slack. I'm taking eng comp 111 for the THIRD time this semester and might fail it again. Even though last semester I had 3.75 GPA because I was interested in those classes (at least most the time! Including accounting, I lived accounting I'm very mathematic and music-inclined).

I'm 23 and I feel like my parents do stuf for me like I'm 13. I don't do my own laundry or clean my room because I'm always "about to", just like everything else. I tried a cigarette one day, and it was so exciting I kept Doing it, always "about to" quit. Now I have even used illegal drugs. Not addictively, but occasionally yet persistently. Wasn't into stimulants, never thought it was my thing, I dabbled with downers (opiates). i think i was a self medicator. i still am, cigarettes and marijuana, which i want to get off both. I did take adderall once and I think it helped me tremendously. I wven think it would protect me from self medicating with illegal bad opiate stuff (even though i cant find it, if i could i probably would unfortunately). and adderall i think would get me off weed and maybe even cigarettes. i think i smoke them for the stimulation. smoked about ten years, but last week i quit for a day (had some chew though) and i was fin untill the next day, i went into class and was like "whoa i need a cigarette" i thought it was just because "class sucks" but now that i figured i have ad/hd i think it was because i couldnt focus and cigarettes help in some way. Going to see a psychiatrist tomorrow. I plan to be honest about everything. I will play It by ear, the level of me "asking for adderall". Of course I'm no professional but if i get something else I think I will want it stil and possibly start dabbling with stuff illegally again (hopefully not).

My parents always say "everytime i ask, you say you're about to (mow the lawn etc) but you never do". Until they literally make me.

I feel like my attention has been drowning, like something holding it down and it gets to come up for air only every split second.

I am motivated and proactive, and have a lot of creative ideas, but they never resurface. After being "about to" do them (like tomorrow) for years, you might diagnose yourself with "potential ad/hd" lmao I am a potential ad/hd suffer myself
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Old 03-10-14, 02:30 AM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

Oh yeah and i am a truly good good person like I actually go out of my way to help people type of person. But I feel like only a few people have ever seen that in real life, when lots of people should have seen my true character by Now.

Oh yeah and I got into two car accidents rear ending people because I forget I'm driving. Driving is one of the few things of the average person that can punish if one forgets what they're doing even for a split second. And I almost drove off the Rocky Mountains four times because we were on a road trip and I had never seen them before. My friend never let me drive his jeep again.

Walking around the grocery store and forgetting what you're doing/what you're looking for/buying things you didn't go there for an don't need and forgetting what you went for)

An I leave my card in the ATM like five times a year. No big deal but a real hassle.

Feeling like people think you are more malicious and lazy than you are humble and proactive. And actually thinking that of yourself even though knowing (sometimes deep) that you in fact are a proactive person, like you really always thought.

I think tru lazy is a little more intentional.

Having to come back saying "oh yeah i forgot to mention this really important thing".
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Old 03-26-14, 04:59 PM
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Re: Possible symptoms - For the undiagnosed out there

Recently I have read a lot about adult ADD and this is probably the best and most in depth and they all pertain to me..See if you agree

1. We are easily distracted and have difficulty paying attention. We have a tendency to tune out or drift away. For example, we might say:
It is a struggle for me to stay focused or centered. When I least expect it, my brain changes channels, and I respond to the beat of another drum.
Although I can hyperfocus a times, I am more often distracted, and have difficulty staying on target.
At times I feel scattered and confused, like iron shavings attracted by competing magnetic fields.
I set out to clean the kitchen, and often find myself reading a cookbook and deciding to try a new recipe. I eventually finish the kitchen, but it takes me a while.
2. We are impulsive, and we make hasty decisions without considering the consequences. For example, we might say:
I make plans without consulting my family, and then wonder why they don't share my enthusiasm. I jump to conclusions before analyzing all the facts. This creates problems in my personal and business life. I make decisions, commitments, purchases, even major life changes without adequately considering the consequences. I buy things I don't need, and then wonder where all my money went. The worst part is having to justify my actions.
3. We are restless, often hyperactive, and full of nervous energy. For example, we might say:
I usually feel edgy and am always "on the go." My insides are constantly churning. I drum my fingers, twist my hair, pace, shift positions while seated, or leave the room frequently. I'm always looking for a way to release my excess energy. I channel-surf with the TV remote control and find it hard to relax. I am an aggressive driver and love to weave in and out of traffic. My favorite game is looking for "hole shots" and creating my own car race.
4. We have a strong sense of underachievement and always feel that we fail to live up to our potential. For example, we might say:
Whether I am highly accomplished or floundering, I feel incapable of realizing my true potential. I feel like a failure and view success as something that only others achieve. In spite of my accomplishments and a satisfying relationship, I find it difficult to feel happy and fulfilled. In school I was called an underachiever, and that message still affects me today. I tend to be critical of my performance, even if others compliment me for a job well done.
5. We have difficulty in relationships. For example, we might say:
My inability to stay focused in the present moment gives others the impression that I don't care. I get bored easily and have a hard time listening to others. I feel uncomfortable in group activities where social interaction is required. I prefer not to be noticed, because I'm afraid I will say the wrong thing. Sometimes I forget to say hello or goodbye, and others accuse me of being rude.
6. We are procrastinators and have trouble getting started or feeling motivated. For example, we might say:
I put things off until the last minute, but the last-minute adrenaline rush makes the task possible, more interesting, and stimulating. I use deadlines as a way to create panic and chaos. This enables me to hyperfocus, so that I can complete the task on time. I allow piles of work to accumulate because I can't get organized. Only in times of hyperfocus can I actually get something accomplished. I'm inclined to start a project the night before it is due, stay up all night to finish it, and be totally burned out the next day.
7. We cannot tolerate boredom and are always looking for something to do. For example, we might say:
I become bored with activities, conversations and situations that do not interest me. I'm always looking for highly stimulating activities that keep my adrenaline flowing. When I sense boredom approaching, I look for something new and stimulating, rather than accept the idea of being bored. All of my waking moments need to be filled with something to do or something to think about. I cannot risk the possibility of having nothing to do.
8. We have difficulty getting organized. For example, we might say:
I have organizational plans, to-do lists, schedules and resolutions, but still end up with piles on my desk, missed appointments and unanswered phone calls. I have difficulty managing my time effectively. I am often late for meetings, and I lose track of everything from keys to commitments. I often feel out of control and confused because I don't know how to organize my time and activities. My kids do a better job of organizing than I do. I do better when others remind me of appointments and give me direction and structure.
9. We are impatient and have a low tolerance for frustration. For example, we might say:
I become impatient when things don't happen fast enough for me. I have a tendency to withdraw or react in anger. I like to know the bottom line without having to listen to all the details that I consider unimportant. If a line is held up because of coupons, price checks or check cashing, I get impatient and want to lash out at the person creating the delay. I don't like waiting for people or dealing with people's problems.
10. We have mood swings with periods of anxiety, depression or loneliness. For example, we might say:
Periods of depression affect my work, relationships and perception of reality. I sometimes withdraw and isolate myself. A simple setback can bring on feelings of overwhelming hopelessness for me. My moods are unpredictable and can cause me to be either verbally and physically active or quiet and inactive. In the midst of a seemingly endless stream of thoughts, a memory of past failure or loss can submerge my mood instantly.
11. We worry excessively and often have a sense of impending doom. For example, we might say:
Within minutes after awakening or after arriving at work, I seem to search my mind for a topic to worry about. I use worry as a way to stay focused. It's like cutting my finger; all my attention can be in one place. A feeling of impending doom seems to hover over me. I worry constantly about my health. I fear that I'm too fat, too thin, or have some fatal or debilitating disease.
12. We have trouble going through established channels or following proper procedures. For example, we might say:
I am a maverick at heart and do not like to follow rules or go through proper channels to complete a task. I tend to be critical of those in charge, and prefer being free to do things my own way. I feel smothered by procedures, policies, and being directed by others. Being required to conform stifles my productivity. I have a hard time teaching my children to respect authority and follow the rules, because I have a hard time doing those things myself.
13. We have many projects going simultaneously, and have trouble following through with a project or task. For example, we might say:
I assume responsibility for more projects than I can realistically accomplish. I lose interest quickly and have difficulty completing one task before starting a new one. I prefer simple tasks that I can complete before I get an urge to start another one. I am capable of juggling lots of projects or commitments at the same time, but it creates anxiety and pressure for me.
14. We are poor observers of ourselves and are often unaware of our effect on others. For example, we might say:
I have difficulty discerning how others perceive me. I rarely pick up the signals that indicate how well I am being received or if I'm talking too much. I tend to monopolize a conversation without knowing it. My friends tell me I talk too much about myself and don't give them a chance to share their story. I often exaggerate a story to make my point, and don't notice that others don't believe me. At work I think others agree with me. In reality they are confused by my "idea-a-minute" mentality.
15. We tend to say what comes to mind without considering the timing or appropriateness of the remark. For example, we might say:
I blurt out inappropriate comments without considering the possible consequences. Later, when I take time to reflect on what I said, I beat myself up for saying something so stupid. I have a hard time waiting my turn in conversations, and I interrupt others while they are talking. I speak out of turn in meetings. This makes people angry, and I often lose the main point of the meeting or lose the respect of those present. I have a reputation for making one-liner comments that hurt people's feelings.
16. We have a tendency toward addictive behavior, and use mood-altering substances to medicate ourselves. For example, we might say:
I use illegal drug to help me focus, alcohol or illegal drug to calm me down, and food to comfort me. I take prescription drugs as a way to speed up or slow down, depending on my needs of the moment. I use coffee and cigarettes to keep me energized and to numb my feelings. I use work to give me focus, motivation, and a sense of accomplishment. At times I use it as a way to avoid boredom.
17. We have difficulty in the workplace. We either change jobs frequently or have trouble getting along with our coworkers. For example, we might say:
I become bored with a job and cannot convince myself to stay, even though my financial security is at stake. I assume too much responsibility or take on too many tasks, and then cannot fulfill my obligations. I change my mind frequently and create confusion among my coworkers.

I waste time and resources on insignificant projects and spend time on things that keep my interest but have little value to the overall scheme of things.
18. We have a family history of ADD or other disorders of impulse control or mood. For example, we might say:
I have biological family members with strong evidence of ADD or other disorders of impulse control. I can trace ADD symptoms back several generations. I have family members who are considered high-strung and who have unstable careers. A lot of my close relatives have trouble controlling their tempers. I have biological children with ADD, and I learned of my own ADD through their diagnosis.
Adapted from The Twelve Steps: A Key to Living With Attention Deficit Disorder (Friends in Recovery, RPI Publishing Inc


Plus I should mention I have been married 3 times and now I know why !!!
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