ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community  

Go Back   ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community > PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ADD/ADHD > General Parenting Issues
Register Blogs FAQ Chat Members List Calendar Donate Gallery Arcade Mark Forums Read

General Parenting Issues The purpose of this forum is to discuss general parenting issues related to children with AD/HD(ADD & ADHD)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-15-09, 06:01 PM
Dizfriz Dizfriz is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,114
Thanks: 15,830
Thanked 10,438 Times in 3,291 Posts
Dizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond repute
Time Out

TIME OUT

A bit of background:

I love to work with out of control children. Also I did a lot of work with Foster care families and Foster Care parents are given few effective tools to handle these children. Often they are simply told to "redirect" Not all that effective with a very out of control child. In this context, I have had to come up with effective tools to give to parents to work with these children.

Over time, with the help of parents, I developed this time out tool. I have had a lot of success with it and seen a lot of behavior changes as a result. It frankly works better than anything else we tried especially with very out of control children. I thought I might share for whatever it is worth. Use or not as you please. If you do like it, change it as you wish and make it your own.

Background principles:
1. As I have posted a number of times, it is the speed of a consequence that is effective not the severity.
2. A number of short time outs will change more behavior than a few long ones.
3. The most effective way to discipline is to make the child responsible for his behaviors
("Put it back on the child")
4. Work should be done at the point of performance
5. A very important thing to keep in mind is that the time out should not seen as a punishment. It is designed to help ADHD kids connect their behaviors with the consequences, a way to help them gain control of their behaviors through the principles of point of performance and external consequences. This is what ADHD kids have difficulty doing. ADHD is a true output disorder. They know what to do but have a difficult time doing what they know. This is ADHD. See this time out as a useable natural consequence for behavior decisions and a way of helping the child connect them.

It is very important for kids and especially ADHD kids to always be held responsible for the consequences of their behavior decisions; but those consequences can be fairly mild and still get the job done quite well.

Now on to the Time Out.

For more on the point of performance:
http://www.addforums.com/forums/show...16&postcount=1

HOW MUCH TIME?
How long a time out? Take the minute per year of age rule. This was developed to teach parents not to give large time outs. Parents would give a 4 year old an hour time out thinking that the more severe the punishment the more effective. The minute per year was designed to deal with this. I consider it to be a maximum however, not a minimum.

What I am after is a time out short enough that the child learns it is easier to accept it than fight, short enough for the parent to comfortably enforce, and long enough to have an impact. Short time outs makes life a lot easier with much less fighting and I have found that a number of short time outs are much more effective and easier than a few long ones. Remember, for a 4 year old two minutes can be an eternity especially if they are ADHD. I have had a lot of success with somewhere around half a minute per year. For a three old; about one minute for example. Later on, if the shorter time is not doing the job it can be extended but by this time, time out will be an accepted part of the child's life. To get it established I often start with very short time even going down so far as a 5 count, (using fingers for the countdown) for a two year out of control child who has never a consequence except for yelling and spankings.

Your first task is to establish time out as a discipline. Once this is done, then it can become an effective tool in changing behaviors.


WHEN TO GIVE THE TIME OUT
Very important: The time out must be done as close as possible to the point of performance. In other words, it should be done as soon as possible after the child breaks a limit or has an inappropriate display of anger. I like less than a minute, ten seconds is better and now is best; only one or two warnings at most, then time out.

This involves very short time outs. With this, you can give the child time a out each time the child breaks the rule or acts up and not feel guilty for doing so. I have had the most success with very out of control children starting with 20 or so short time outs a day done at the point of performance and without anger. It really works.

This method has a dual purpose. One is enforcing a limit; the other is to help children gain control of their anger.

HOW IT IS DONE
Before we start, be aware that each parent will likely develop their own version of this. This essay is just to present the general outline of the method. I am giving somewhat lengthy verbal responses to demonstrate the attitude. Most end up with "You did _____, time out now!" The kids know what to do, it is helping them do what they know that we are addressing.

1. Find a count down clock, one that you can stop and start. Wal-Mart usually has several varieties of cooking timers or you can put a glass of water in a microwave and use the timer (had someone burn up a microwave by not doing this so take care). Egg timers have also been used. A watch works if it has a start stop button.

2. Tell the child that he or she has to sit down and be calm for the designated time. Use some variation of "You have a time out for ________. I am not angry at you, but you broke a rule so you have to be sit there for your time and be calm. I am going to set the timer on three minutes. As soon as you sit there quietly and still for three minutes you can get up." It helps to have the timer where the child can see it. Even if the child cannot tell time, they can see the numbers change so it is usually quite effective for younger children.

3. The child must remain reasonably still and quite for the given time (these are kids after all and often ADHD. Being totally still and quite is not likely to happen thus the term "reasonably"). If the child does not do this, then the clock stops (stop the timer) until the child is reasonably still and quite again (resume the time out.) Some parents will start over but I think the stop start method is more effective; your choice.

This may take a good bit of effort at first and you may have to spend time with the child making sure that they stay sitting and working on calming down. I have seen it take forty five minutes or more for the first few times to set the pattern for a really out of control child. If they really start to act up too much, have them go to their room until they are ready to do the time out and when they calm down, they have them come back and finish their time.

4. The attitude should be that the kid decided to have the time out (make the child responsible). You might tell the child that it is his decision how long he will stay in time out. "Take all the time you want kid, I have all the time in the world for this" Keep in mind that, for the most part, it is not having to sit that is the punishment it is not being able to do what they want to do right now.

Some parents like to discuss the infraction before the child can get up. "Tell me what you did wrong (you can also ask "what can you do to make it better next time")". If they cannot tell you, tell the child the reason he was in time out and have him repeat it. Then in a pleasant voice; "OK, you can get up now." Use whatever seems best to you at the time.

Keep reminding or demonstrating to the child that you are not angry and they can get up when their time out is up (or they discuss what they did). Example: "You decided to go to time out when you hit your sister. As soon as your three minutes is up (and we talk about what you did) you can go back to playing." You should remain calm but firm and not raise your voice while doing this. Once they have finished the time out then it is over until next time. When it is over, acknowledge the child's making it through time out successfully. (Acknowledgements are a good tool to use here.
For more on this: http://www.addforums.com/forums/show...77&postcount=1 )

Children will often do the same offense several times to see if you will really enforce. If they test you by acting up again, then you simply start a new time out, same format. "You can have all the time outs you want, your decision"

After a while they will know that this is a natural consequence of not controlling their behaviors and all this will become much easier.

5. The most important parts of this are to be immediate and consistent. Do it more or less the same way each time. When the child breaks a limit or looses control this means they are going to have to do a time out. When away from home, you can use a watch or other timer or even guess at the time. The main thing is that the child has to calm down before they can do other things.

MAKE IT HAPPEN
Another big key to this is that they cannot get out of the time out once it is placed on. If they act up too much send them to their room to calm down (not as a punishment). When they come out they have to go right back to the time out area to finish. If you have to leave then they will finish as soon as you get back. If they go to sleep, then they have to finish when they wake up even if it is in the morning. They likely will have forgotten what they did but it the fact that none of their maneuvers will get them out of the time out that makes this effective. We are only talking about a short time out here for pete's sake. Don't feel guilty for enforcing.

In this context, before you put on a time out, make sure you can and will enforce it. If you are not ready to enforce either ratchet it down to where you can and will enforce or simply let it go for now. It's ok at times. Sometimes time outs simply are not doable or you simply may not feel like it just then.

But *DO NOT PUT IT ON AND THEN FAIL TO ENFORCE!* You are just setting your self up for more battles.

Consistency and speed are the keys. Do not wait until 20 warnings and a bout of yelling and fighting. Instead, move right into "You did _____ time out now!"

Some principles:

It is the speed in which the consequence occurs, not the severity, that gets the job done.

Nothing gets them out of the time out.

If you get upset, the child wins; if you don't you win. It is pretty much that simple.

Those who act win; those that talk loose. (Act, don't yak).

*PICK YOUR BATTLES AND MAKE THEM FEW.* Really, really, important.

A quick but important note on making the child responsible. When *you* put a child in time out the child often (usually?) interprets it as the only reason he is in time out is that you are mad at him and this is what you decided. Since you decided to do this, you can change your mind and if you don't you are being "mean". How many times have you been told by your child that you were mean. Well, that is pretty much the way the child sees it. Here the child has lost all connection between what he did and the consequence. He is putting you at fault for being in time out, not him. Instead frame it as the child's decision. "You decided on time out when you_______." "It was your choice, why get mad at me"

There really is a lot more to this but this essay is long enough as it is. Other areas involved with time out are Fall Back Positions when the child will not do the time out, How to deal with a really out of control child, In Place Time Outs for use when away from the home and a couple of others. I would like to address more the concept of choice in working with children. Perhaps for later.

BTW, a variation of this has worked well for Asperger's kids. Again, perhaps for later.

As always, I use the male pronouns for writing convenience. This is for girls also.

This is not a prescription but a general method. You have to craft the technique to fit you and your child.

As always, I am a terrible proofreader. Make allowances if you would.

Dizfriz

Last edited by Lady Lark; 04-22-09 at 04:06 PM.. Reason: added info
Reply With Quote
The Following 18 Users Say Thank You to Dizfriz For This Useful Post:
BlessedMommy (05-20-14), BrainFreeze (11-20-14), CHMOM (08-29-09), fliparagon (03-16-11), GabesMom (03-16-11), Imnapl (04-16-09), Janben (07-17-13), jenmomof2boys (12-02-11), Jillette (04-18-09), Justtess (04-15-09), Karaisoke (08-18-10), Kari (02-25-11), littlepig (12-28-11), lmo0408 (01-31-11), Lovin'Parenting (10-25-10), Old School MBD (04-15-09), SanityEludesMe (12-22-10), tookiebexar (05-10-13)
  #2  
Old 04-15-09, 06:38 PM
Justtess Justtess is offline
Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 890
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 620
Thanked 698 Times in 385 Posts
Justtess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud of
Re: Time Out

Dizfriz,

I wish a post like this was around when my teen was a child. It would have saved a lot of grief and parental anguish. Time out was the cure all "safe" technique that should have worked for all kids if in easy steps... about 10 years ago and my older son reacted non-compliantly while my younger son knew expectations and got out of time out quickly. (I had no idea at the time he was ADHD, just thought he was a strong willed child)

Quote:
Consistency and speed are the keys. Do not wait until 20 warnings and a bout of yelling and fighting. Instead, move right into "You did _____ time out now!"
So true, my older son wouldn't know what you are talking about if you address it 10 minutes later.

Quote:
Some principles:

It is the speed in which the consequence occurs, not the severity, that gets the job done.Consistency and speed are the keys. Do not wait until 20 warnings and a bout of yelling and fighting. Instead, move right into "You did _____ time out now!"
.
I realized it was useless to increase the punishment. He would cross the well defined line until he lost everything in his room. The next day, he doesn't know how it happend and thought it was very unfair (especially because I didn't punish his younger compliant brother as severely) He had no clue why and it took me a while to understand that while he was trying to manage (control) himself it backfired and got him in more trouble.


Quote:
Some principles:

It is the speed in which the consequence occurs, not the severity, that gets the job done

Nothing gets them out of the time out.

If you get upset, the child wins; if you don't you win. It is pretty much that simple.
My son gets so clever with this and knows how to push everyones buttons since he was very young (mostly out of curiosity). I have to remind myself that "adults do not argue with children." and repeat with eyes closed so I don't engage in a verbal war. I sometimes wish things were a little easier as those time out years and your post would have made me feel more successful parent. I'm glad you posted it
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Justtess For This Useful Post:
Dizfriz (04-15-09), Imnapl (04-16-09), Old School MBD (04-15-09)
  #3  
Old 04-15-09, 06:43 PM
Old School MBD's Avatar
Old School MBD Old School MBD is offline
Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: S.E. Washington State (in A Wheat Field)
Posts: 991
Thanks: 558
Thanked 315 Times in 229 Posts
Old School MBD has a spectacular aura aboutOld School MBD has a spectacular aura about
Re: Time Out

If simply sitting down wont work...........
In the 1970's version of a time out, I would be told to "go put your nose in the corner".
The child (me) would go stand in a corner with his nose up against it. That way there is no fidgeting, cause you can not move much without the nose leaving the corner!

Timer re starts if you move!!!
__________________
Yo........What up?
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Old School MBD For This Useful Post:
Dizfriz (04-15-09), Imnapl (04-16-09), Justtess (04-17-09)
Sponsored Links
  #4  
Old 04-15-09, 09:39 PM
CaryC CaryC is offline
Newbie
 

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: East Amherst, NY
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
CaryC is on a distinguished road
Re: Time Out

Some great ideas here. I add one more important point. Timers should never be used when implementing time-out. We only put kids in time-out to create motivation. If you put a 4 year old in time-out for 4 minutes, what do you think will happen if he is fully motivated after 1 minute? He will find his own use for that motivation - screaming, tantrums, etc. Most parents take this to mean the child is not motivated and add time to his sentence. Conversely, what if that child needed 8 minutes of motivation? Then you let him out too soon. Given the fact that kids with ADHD suffer from "time blindness" (as you so expertly described in another article), there is a new movement afoot referred to as "behavior-limited discipline" that suggests that if the child does something inappropriate to get into a punishment, he is required to perform some type of corrective activity to get out of the punishment. This way each time a child misbehaves he can immediately use that motivation created by sitting in time-out to strengthen a competing behavior. We are starting preliminary research in the fall but this approach is already gaining support by prominent psychologists and we expect more to follow suit as reviews of the manual come out.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-16-09, 09:56 PM
Imnapl's Avatar
Imnapl Imnapl is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Canada
Posts: 8,848
Blog Entries: 2
Thanks: 13,418
Thanked 3,791 Times in 1,933 Posts
Imnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond reputeImnapl has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Time Out

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaryC View Post
We are starting preliminary research in the fall but this approach is already gaining support by prominent psychologists and we expect more to follow suit as reviews of the manual come out.
CaryC, by "we", do you mean it in the royal sense?
__________________
Things are not always what they seem; the first appearance deceives many; the intelligence of a few perceives what has been carefully hidden.

Phaedrus


Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-17-09, 12:21 AM
meadd823's Avatar
meadd823 meadd823 is offline
Super Meowaderator
 

Join Date: May 2004
Location: address unknown
Posts: 20,882
Blog Entries: 38
Thanks: 6,844
Thanked 15,415 Times in 6,122 Posts
meadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Time Out

Parenting has gone to the "lab" - geez letting it go to the dogs would be more fun [IMHO}

When I acted up I had to go to my room and think of better ways to express my emotions or deal with a given situation - I have heard of parents doing this except my mom literally expected alternate options and would want me to tell her what they were and discuss why I thought this one may work better than the one that got me sent to my room.

Many think that because I was hyperactive this amount of consideration and communication would not be possible at six but there was a twist - I was allowed to wiggle and think - She didn't expect me to sit and concentrate like every one else I was allowed to move and this made all of the difference in the world and took no more training than a change in perception - Hyperactive kids need movement to clear their minds. Ever notice the more stimuli the more a hyper child moves - the movement is an effort to clear the mind of all the clutter and it works.


Some times hyperactive kids act out because the damn word expects us to be still when it is uncomfortable for us to do so - By the time most hyperactive kids are ten we have had a decade of people expecting us to be like them and punishing us because we are different.


This is not to say kids should be allowed to be brats and run wild but some time modifications in some areas to accommodate the extra activity level will help as the hyper child experiences some one who is trying to work within their nature instead of just another person who wants the hyper kid to be like every one else.

My mom got cooperation where others failed because she accepted me as I was - I understood some times sitting was necessary - but there were times I couldn't and she would work with me on ways no help me instead of just cramming neurotypical down my throat. I had a lot less behavior problems than most hyperactive individuals. While I am sure temperament had a hand I do not think any thing would have helped me had I not had one person on the planet accept me for me and work within who I was.

I just couldn't help notice "we" and the you must be still approach to parenting and be thnakful for a parent who was willing to modify this for me.

If my mom could make me be still for an hour I would not have been hyperactive ADD Attempting to force me to do this would have resulted in ten times the behavior problems I had to live away from my mother for a while and I was expect to sit through church - I couldn't so I got my a s s beat every Sunday To an outsider I am sure it appeared that I didn't connect the punishment with my behavior or I was unable toi contol myself or lack the ability to remember last Sundays butt busting which is a load of crap but I let adults think what every they wanted.

If a child can remember a favorite song, or a conversation for a week ago or where she ate that wonderful ice cream a month ago then she can remember ten minutes later why she was punished.

It may be hard to get out feelings and stuff in word especially if I was expected to sit still and talk - gee by the time I was seven I figured out that saying "I don't know" or adopting a dumb look would get me moving faster , so with some adults that is the way I went with it.

Why struggle with words to express myself to an adult who is more interested in making me be like them than they were in me as a person - I remember thinking those exact words when I was seven and I was as hyper as the day is long - so much for that lack of internal dialog thing.
__________________


Follow ADDForums on Twitter & Facebook
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to meadd823 For This Useful Post:
Dizfriz (04-17-09), Imnapl (04-17-09), Justtess (04-17-09), Lady Lark (04-17-09)
  #7  
Old 04-17-09, 07:44 AM
CaryC CaryC is offline
Newbie
 

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: East Amherst, NY
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
CaryC is on a distinguished road
Re: Time Out

Quote:
Originally Posted by meadd823 View Post
Parenting has gone to the "lab" - geez letting it go to the dogs would be more fun [IMHO}

When I acted up I had to go to my room and think of better ways to express my emotions or deal with a given situation - I have heard of parents doing this except my mom literally expected alternate options and would want me to tell her what they were and discuss why I thought this one may work better than the one that got me sent to my room.
Most methods being used today came from the lab! And, you'll be happy to know, that the push towards "behavior-limited discipline" is totally in line with what your mother did when you were a kid! Punishments should not be based on time; they should end when the child is ready to practice a competing behavior. Your mom was ahead of her time!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-17-09, 09:26 AM
Justtess Justtess is offline
Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 890
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 620
Thanked 698 Times in 385 Posts
Justtess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud ofJusttess has much to be proud of
Re: Time Out

Thank you mead for letting me see what an indifidual with ADHD views parental discipline like "time out". When I think of my parenting, I think I generally tell both of my childrne -- this is the end result of what I want to happen. How you arrive there is your choice, but xyz will not happen if it isn't done. It could be as simple as hanging up your clothes or rewashing dishes that wasn't done properly.

I often find my dx teen fustrated claiming "it's not fair" for a variety of reasons especially lately. He claims he needs everyone's help while he just 'sits' there and then get's angry because he has lost a privilidge.

I am thinking with your post, he is probably experiencing displaced anger and fustration. sigh.... i have no idea if I can get through to him before he is off on his own thinking the entire world is unfair in addition to his mother.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Justtess For This Useful Post:
Dizfriz (04-19-09), Imnapl (04-17-09)
  #9  
Old 04-18-09, 01:04 PM
Jillette Jillette is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: May 2008
Location: U
Posts: 211
Thanks: 12
Thanked 60 Times in 49 Posts
Jillette is a jewel in the roughJillette is a jewel in the roughJillette is a jewel in the rough
Re: Time Out

That is some helpful advice it is hard parenting as it is. It is even more difficult for the children in foster care not knowing what the future holds and it is sad but true they not only have to deal with being separated from parent (even though better for them) but sometimes they get moved from place to place. I deal with those poor soles too but in a different fashion I am the caseworker doing the placing and moving.
__________________
10 year old daughter with Moderate to Severe ADHD, combined type, ODD, mild anxiety, and Sensory Processing Disorder.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Jillette For This Useful Post:
Dizfriz (04-19-09)
  #10  
Old 04-18-09, 01:51 PM
Dizfriz Dizfriz is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,114
Thanks: 15,830
Thanked 10,438 Times in 3,291 Posts
Dizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Time Out

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jillette View Post
That is some helpful advice it is hard parenting as it is. It is even more difficult for the children in foster care not knowing what the future holds and it is sad but true they not only have to deal with being separated from parent (even though better for them) but sometimes they get moved from place to place. I deal with those poor soles too but in a different fashion I am the caseworker doing the placing and moving.
(gets upset> starts rant)
So many kids are moved from home to home. I have had some report being in almost 20 homes. Now these are usually kids put into the system as infants and are now getting ready to leave the system, but still should anyone be surprised that these kids soon learn not to trust or allow themselves to grow close to anyone.

Even worse, they often do not allow any closure often pulling them out of the home in the middle of the night with no possibility of communication with the previous foster parents. I have seen this happen when the foster parents do nothing wrong just that CPS decided to move them.

Mmmm, lets see how we can traumatize them, lets see if we can help them develop a reactive attachment disorder.

It can be a mess and it is the kids that suffer when these things happen. I wish I had some answers but I don't. I do tend to get somewhat upset thinking about this and this post is perhaps a tad out of my routine forum emotional intensity.
(ends rant>calms down>whew!)

This is not to take away from some of the wonderful foster parents and caseworkers I have worked with. Often I found it was an honor and a privilege to work with these.

Dizfriz
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Dizfriz For This Useful Post:
Imnapl (04-19-09)
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tips on how to get to work on time! kimmyh51 Careers/Job Impact 9 03-23-09 02:17 AM
This is a vent...I'm probably wasting my time. Trooper Keith Anxiety Disorders, OCD & PTSD 12 09-28-05 01:50 AM
Pot and ADD killed my relationship...can it be "fixed"? Potuncle Relationships & Social Issues 10 11-19-04 11:42 PM
time to chat minn306 Chit-Chat 5 11-10-04 03:22 PM
Bathing time nightmare with ADHD child... Help what to do? mlk2001 General Parenting Issues 7 10-13-04 07:02 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums