ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community  

Go Back   ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community > CO-EXISTING CONDITIONS > Sensory
Register Blogs FAQ Chat Members List Calendar Donate Gallery Arcade Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-29-06, 06:38 PM
speedo's Avatar
speedo speedo is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 4,458
Thanks: 54
Thanked 517 Times in 287 Posts
speedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud of
Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

comment: I found this on the net and thought it was interesting, and relevant to ADDers with hypersensitivities and not just to autistics, so I posted it here.
I am no sure that I totally accept what the author is saying, but it is sure interesting...

ME






Anne Pemberton
Irlen Scotopic Sensitivity: The Link to Autism

Paper

Introduction

Scotopic sensitivity (Irlen Syndrome) is a visual processing deficit caused by a
sensitivity to light. It is estimated to affect around 20% of the general
population, resulting in under achievement in school and at work (Riley 1999)
and underlies the serious sensory overload experienced in autism (Irlen 1997).
This sensitivity slows down the timing by which the brain receives and processes
visual information, resulting in varying degrees of dyslexia, attention deficit and
autism depending on the individual. Although the individual may have any one
of the three diagnoses there may be times when he does not really fit the
clinical picture. Physical effects of Scotopic sensitivity include photophobia
(especially under bright light and fluorescent lighting), eyestrain, headaches,
photosensitive epilepsy, stress and fatigue. Reading difficulties result from
visual distortions of the printed page caused by high contrast (black print on
white paper). The high functioning child often reads well, thereby masking the
SS, but may be hyperlexic. 81% of individuals with autism report these visual
distortions of their whole environment (Geneva Centre 1999). In many their
visual field of focus is as small as 10cm meaning their eyes have to flit all over
to take in a whole scene. This results in blurred, fragmented and multiple vision
and extreme stress.

Sensory system

In humans 70% of information coming into the brain is visual, making vision the
dominant sense. Blind individuals are known to rely more on auditory and tactile
processing. However, in scotopic sensitivity individuals are unaware of their
visual difficulties until corrected. The stress of this visual perceptual difficulty
creates hypersensitivity and lack of integration of other senses as they attempt
to compensate for poor visual perception. This may result in monotropism
(Williams 1996b), or the inability to use more than one sense at a time.
Behaviours characteristic of this are flinching in response to sudden movement,
hypersensitivity to sudden unexpected noise, stereotypic behaviour around the
eyes (finger poking, rubbing). The touch, taste, smell and hearing of individuals
with over aroused nervous systems provide graphic detail of the difficulties
encountered. Although the sensory problems of autism are well documented
(Williams 1998, Carlton 1993, Sacks 1995, Grandin 1996) they are often
overlooked (Grandin1996). Bettleheim ( 1969) and Timbergen (1983) identified
stress and anxiety as a major component in autistic spectrum disorders. This is
verified in autobiographic writings of individuals with autism.

Links with psychological theory

Baron-Cohen (1995) identified individuals with autism as having an impaired
theory of mind. He relates his theory to eye contact and the language of the
eyes. He states that part of decoding the language of the eyes is in detecting
the contrast between the white of the sclera and the dark of the iris and pupil.
The first hallmark of Scotopic sensitivity is a difficulty with contrast. This would
make eye contact painful, avoidance and limitation of eye contact are portrayed
well in autism.

Leslie (1987) highlighted difficulties in making mental representation or
symbolising. For instance the child who cannot improvise a banana for a
telephone. The second hallmark of Scotopic sensitivity is inability to see the
whole picture. Linking Scotopic sensitivity to Leslie's theory one cannot build a
mental representation without a visual representation as a starting point.

Hobson (1989, 1993) looks at autism from an emotional perspective. He states
that the child learns emotions directly from the mother's facial expression. With
Scotopic sensitivity in mind It may be that the child may be able to process
concrete emotions such as happy and sad with the help of motherease. As
emotions become more complex body language also comes into play and the
child cannot make up the whole picture.

Ozonoff et al (1991) identified a lack of executive functioning. Executive
functioning enables planning, sequencing, organising and is also responsible
for impulsiveness. Visual disturbances are known to accompany migraine,
epilepsy and systemic shock. Disturbance results in disorientation and loss of
executive functioning. Stress ensues and the two fall into a spiral, one
precipitating the other.

Study

A single subject behavioural study on a 12yr old male (DJ) was combined with
the diary of a 30 yr old female (MJ). Both have a diagnosis of Asperger
syndrome. Observations were recorded before and after correction with Irlen
lenses.

DJ before Irlen:

Extremely anxious, particularly in social situations. Extreme emotional
sensitivity resulting in violence and aggression at school. Much quieter
at home.
Stance very rigid. More so under stress, becoming very "Bull like".
Visual field of 17" (45cm). Could see faces at a distance of 60-67.5cm.
Outside this range he reports seeing "picasso" style.
Travel - never looked out of the window. Always "focused" inside a
book. Car radio always on loud to "drown out white noise".
Giddy, loud and boisterous in busy areas. Reluctant to go outside,
clung to care's arm constantly. Lots of "touching". Hitting out in the
playground and cloakroom - resistant to behaviour modification.
Continually tripping and bumping. Major physical co-ordination
difficulties.
Complaints of over sensitive sensory system, i.e. Loud noises, scratchy
fabrics, painful touch, poor temperature control, difficulties with smell,
texture and taste. Carbohydrate binger.


DJ after Irlen:

Immediate effect of calmness. Obvious expression of happiness. At the
time they were first fitted DJ was quickly becoming agitated after being
unavoidably place under fluorescent lights.
More relaxed stance generally.
Visual field opened up to 12'6" (375cm). Could see the author's whole
face. Picked up an unknown book and read with enthusiasm.
Looked out of the car window for the first time. Now enjoys the
scenery. Reports previously feeling very car sick.
Much more relaxed in social situations. No more "grounding / touching"
behaviour.
Coordination much improved.
No further "hitting" in the cloakroom. Much less affected by noise and
movement.
Visual problems eradicated. Some sounds still painful but no longer
make DJ jump. Smells, fabrics and foods tolerated much better.


MJ before Irlen:

Extreme stress.
Visually - print moves about, can only see one letter at a time. Unable
to see whole faces as the picture breaks up. Flat 2D vision. Visual field
4" (11cm).
Difficulty with speed and distance. Traffic jumps out from junctions.
Difficulty tracking moving objects. Poor balance and coordination.
Motion sickness when walking about, driving.
Social situations unbearable. Cannot make sense of environmental
movement. Jumpy. Bothered by noise. View of the world painfully
intolerable.


MJ after Irlen:

Effect is immediate. Marked reduction in stress.
All print stable, can read without effort. Visual field opened up to 15'.
Aware for the first time how "picasso" like vision is.
Traffic glides now. Driving much less stressful.
Complete eradication of motion sickness.
Less stressed in busy situations. Now aware of previous blocking-out /
daydreaming to reduce visual overload.


Conclusion

DJ has been assessed as high functioning - verbal IQ 140, Full scale IQ 132,
performance IQ 110. Despite his ability he has been unable to continually
access mainstream curriculum, due to refusal to work and challenging behaviour
(violence towards others). His communication prior to the application of Irlen
lenses had deteriorated to one word answers and electronic jargon. He was
head banging, self abusing, spinning and rocking almost continually. He
developed stress asthma, psoriasis, athletes foot, excema and frequent mouth
ulcers, all indicative of a stressed auto immune system. The observation of his
behaviour under fluorescent lights highlighted immediately why DJ found school
intolerable.

According to Morris (1999) stress stimulates the sympathetic nervous system.
The pupils let in more light and the acoustic nerves are stimulated to give acute
hearing ready for fight or flight. Continuous stress results in increased brain
endorphins (causing aches, pains and exhaustion), abnormal thyroid activity
(poor temperature regulation), physical skin discomfort (crawling), increased
white cell activity (destruction of normal cells) and lactic acid build up (muscle
pain). All of which are seen in autism.

Explanations for autistic behaviours

Obsessions

DJ has always been interested in electronics, which are logical and predictable
with a scientific approach. Electronic reading is ariel type font and schematic
diagrams making it easier to follow. His high ability in the subject along with
other's lack of ability meant that perhaps his ability would never come into
question. However, he often over inflates his ability which is indicative of his low
self esteem. He is also apt to complete an electronics project which then fails to
work because he has missed a vital piece of instruction. This may account for
his patchy learning in general.

Rhythmic behaviour

DJ has always displayed rhythmic behaviour despite many professional
attempts to eradicate these. Under stress (both positive and negative) he rocks
on his bottom or his feet. He also spins around the coffee table, and has been
noted to be confused at this time. Both DJ and MJ report rocking as a focus to
"tune out" sensory bombardment, or aiding concentration in a visually
stimulating environment.

Self abuse

Biting and head banging have been a common occurrence for DJ since birth.
He reports biting as stopping his skin crawling. He reports head banging as
making his eyes work or emptying his head. He is also notorious for facial
grimacing which was an attempt to cut down light intensity. Self abuse, which
was always evident under stress, has discontinued since the application of Irlen
lenses.

Fantasy / Reality distinction

DJ has often been identified as having difficulty distinguishing fiction from
reality. The author would like to offer an alternative to this view with a personal
anecdote to demonstrate reasoning.

DJ caused an uproar in the staff room of his primary school when he wrote a
story in which he said

"On Wednesdays dad baths us and dries us with a blowlamp".

If this sentence is viewed in the context of Leslie's metarepresentational theory
the following applies. Without a visual representation there would be no mental
representation as already stated. Without a mental representation one cannot
build a concept of "is like". Lack of the concept prevents appropriate
communication of experience. It is possible that DJ's experience of being dried
by his dad was a burning sensation in line with sensory hypersensitivity. He
would not have the "is like" concept to communicate this.

DJ and MJ are highly sensing individuals who have developed what might be
described as a sixth sense in relation to animals and like minded people. They
are amazingly empathetic and animated towards people who are themselves of
a calm, quiet and patient disposition. Perhaps these individuals are no threat to
their sensory systems and ultimately no threat to their emotions.

Implications of Scotopic sensitivity on the learning environment

Reading

Difficulties with reading and contrast as previously discussed might result in the
following:

Slow choppy reading.
Loss of words, lines, sentences preventing the construction of
meaning.
Chunk reading - the individual might give the impression of skim
reading by actually homing in on relevant facts, reading o few
sentences and moving to the next fact. In this manner the body of the
text is missed resulting in loss of the plot. In DJ's case the inability to
read Times new Roman text has reduced his access to fiction. This has
been compounded by his light sensitivities being within the primary
colour range. He therefore was unable to watch cartoons. He refers to
fiction and cartoons as "non- sensical rubbish".


Memory

According to Middleton (1999) individuals retain 10% of information heard, 50%
if heard and seen and 90% if heard, seen and done. If DJ is concentrating to
keep visual information in focus he has to tune out white noise, which explains
why he was often perceived to be deaf. Tuning out may mean he loses
valuable auditory information. He learns better from practical situations where
he can relate his learning to real life. In a school science situation pre Irlen he
was extremely egocentric. This too has diminished since his success to learning
has been improved.

Computers can also aid learning for individuals with scotopic sensitivity. They
provide easier access to empty the contents of memory onto paper. They are
also a tremendous aid to storing factual information. As the background
contrast and text can be manipulated to aid reading they are tremendously
important to a child with Scotopic sensitivity. Many high functioning individuals
with autism are understood to be obsessed with computers. Perhaps they are
used by the child inadvertently to compensate for their own difficulties. DJ and
MJ support this view.

Communication

The previously discussed difficulties also have implications within
communication. Many stumble and stutter over words, forget everyday
vocabulary, many often have difficulty phrasing statements (Blackburn 1999).
With Scotopic sensitivity in mind, perhaps they speak as they read. DJ and MJ
report an inability to phrase what they wish to say because their head are full,
information therefore tumbles out in hap-hazard fashion. As a fellow
communicator the author supports their views.

The way forward

DJ and MJ have been wearing Irlen lenses for three and four months
respectively. Both are seeing subtle differences in relation to sensory
experience. Both are less jumpy, less impulsive, less emotionally charged,
better able to read think and communicate. Both have seen a marked reduction
in rigid, obsessive and ritualistic behaviour. Their confidence is increasing as
others report their own observation. Both report a marked reduction in
hypersensitivity both sensory and emotionally. Both report eating a more varied
diet. Both report better sleeping habits and the ability to actually get off to
sleep. Both report a marked increase in the ability to concentrate. To date 45
others are following the Irlen experience and the research continues.

I am not suggesting that Irlen lenses are a cure for autism. The suggestion is
that Irlen lenses cut down sensory overload significantly to enable valuable
learning to take place. The suggestion is also that Scotopic sensitivity may be
the primary deficit in autistic spectrum disorders. The only word of caution to
make if you wish to follow this method is avoid high street optician tints. Irlen
use a medical model to precision tint which is not offered anywhere else.
Precision tinting is vital.

Irlen information can be obtained from the book: 'Reading By The Colors' by
Helen Irlen, Avery publishing, New York, USA. Color treatment with Irlen color
filters helps dyslexia. 85 Irlen Centres worldwide. References included in Irlen's
book, Website: www.irlen.com, or write:

Irlen Institiute,
5380 Village Road,
Long Beach,
CA 90808, USA.
Tel: 001 562-496-2550
Fax: 001 562-429-8699
Email: Irlen Institute@irlen.com

The full study (9000 words) can be obtained directly from the author.

References:

1. Baron-Cohen, S. (1995) Mindblindness: An essay on autism and theory of
mind. U.S.A MIT press.
2. Bettleheim, B. (1969) The empty fortress: Infantile autism and the birth of
self. New York: The free press.
3. Blackburn, J. (1999) An insider's view of autism.
http://planet.com/users//blackjar/ autism.html.
4. Carlton, S. (1993) The other side of autism: A positive approach. Worcester:
Self publishing association.
5. Geneva center for autism (1999) Autism, Schizophrenia and the Irlen
method. Leeds Handout from Irlen seminar at Beckett Park.
6. Grandin, T. (1996) Experiences with visual thinking, sensory problems and
communication difficulties. Colorado state university.
7. Hobson, R. P. (1989) Beyond cognition: A theory of autism. In G. Dawson
(ed.) Autism: Nature, diagnosis and treatment, pp.-48. New York: Guilford.
8. Hobson, R. P. (1993) Autism and the development of mind. Hove: Lawrence
Erlbaum.
9. Irlen, H. (1997) The world of misperception. Irlen coloured filters. Latitudes, 2,
5, pp.-17. California.
10. Leslie, A. (1987) Pretence and Representation: The origins of "Theory of
mind". Psychological review, 94: pp. 412-26.
11. Middleton, C. (1999). Personal communication.- ENB 998 course. University
of Huddersfield.
12. Morris, B. (1999) Why stress could be good for your body: Good health
research. Daily Mail Tuesday May 25 p45.
13. Ozonoff, S. (1995) Executive functions in autism. In Schopler, E. Mesibov,
G. B. (Eds) Learning and cognition in autism. New York: Pleneum.
14. Riley, D. (1999) Irlen centre web page Kent Irlen centre U.K. email:
101567.2412@compuserve.com.
15. Sacks, O. (1995) An anthropologist on Mars, London: Picador.
16. Tinbergen, A.N. E. (1983) Autistic children - new hope for a cure. George
allen and Unwin.
17. Williams, D. (1996b) Autism: An inside-out approach. London: Jessica
Kingsley.
18. Williams, D. (1998) Autism and Sensing: The unlost instinct. London:
Jessica Kingsley.j
__________________
ADHD.... It's not just for kids anymore...
It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
"Sig personnas illegitum non carborundum." (unknown)
The computer lets you make more mistakes faster, with the exception of tequila and a handgun. (M. Radcliffe)
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to speedo For This Useful Post:
anonone (09-18-08)
  #2  
Old 05-29-06, 06:58 PM
speedo's Avatar
speedo speedo is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 4,458
Thanks: 54
Thanked 517 Times in 287 Posts
speedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud of
Just for balance... here is a rather scathing critique of the "irlens" proponents...

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...28/ai_n6100519


When I was in college, I had a friend who was hypersensitive to red wavelengths of light.

She was also totally colorblind, and wore deep green tinted sunglesses with side shields.

Even at thast she found the red brakelights of cars to be intolerably bright.
I made a handheld photospectrometer for her so she could tell what color things were by pointing it at the object in question. She literally wore it out from use.

ME
__________________
ADHD.... It's not just for kids anymore...
It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
"Sig personnas illegitum non carborundum." (unknown)
The computer lets you make more mistakes faster, with the exception of tequila and a handgun. (M. Radcliffe)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-04-06, 10:51 AM
janesays's Avatar
janesays janesays is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 299
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
janesays is on a distinguished road
I just read that some autistics and possibly some ADDers can pick up the flicker of florescent lights because electricity is not a constant flow there are about 60 "glitches" per second. I know that's not the scientific explanation but I I've experienced this before. I am also very sensitive to headlights, street lights and bright signs when I am driving at night. It's almost caused me to go in the ditch before. If someone has their brights on and are coming at me on the highway sometimes I have to slow down or pull over. I even use the trick where you look at the fog line but it doesn't help.
__________________
"Only those who attempt the absurd will achieve the impossible." M.C. Escher
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #4  
Old 06-04-06, 12:44 PM
speedo's Avatar
speedo speedo is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 4,458
Thanks: 54
Thanked 517 Times in 287 Posts
speedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud of
It is a fact. If I am extremely stressed (read that as "sensory overload") I can sometimes see fluorescent lights flicker. It looks like dark bands undulating down the length of the fluorescent lamp tubes. It is a bit distracting. I have ADHD combined type.

Not only can some adders and some autistics see it, so can some persons with bipolar disorder. I'd also be willing to wager a shiny new dime that some persons with sensory integration disorder can see it too.

I sometimes find brights lights irritatiing, almost upsetting. It varies. It is one of the ways I can judge my degree of overload. If I start finding car headlights and street lights to be a bit bothersome I know that I am approaching my "limit" on sensory overload/stress and I need to do something to reduce my stress levels.

Me



Quote:
Originally Posted by janesays
I just read that some autistics and possibly some ADDers can pick up the flicker of florescent lights because electricity is not a constant flow there are about 60 "glitches" per second. I know that's not the scientific explanation but I I've experienced this before. I am also very sensitive to headlights, street lights and bright signs when I am driving at night. It's almost caused me to go in the ditch before. If someone has their brights on and are coming at me on the highway sometimes I have to slow down or pull over. I even use the trick where you look at the fog line but it doesn't help.
__________________
ADHD.... It's not just for kids anymore...
It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
"Sig personnas illegitum non carborundum." (unknown)
The computer lets you make more mistakes faster, with the exception of tequila and a handgun. (M. Radcliffe)

Last edited by speedo; 06-04-06 at 01:00 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-07-06, 11:52 AM
anamari's Avatar
anamari anamari is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: PA, USA
Posts: 231
Thanks: 2
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
anamari is on a distinguished road
I am sensitive to light -but I think it is a different reason than the one the article is speaking about....

The upside of my sensitivity is that I see better in the dark than most people....

The funny part is that I close my eyes in most pictures were a flashlight is used and I give a lot of trouble to the people that are trying to take passport photos of me....
__________________
"for such a smart gal, you say a lot of stupid things"- childhood friend
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-07-06, 12:09 PM
kvrrd's Avatar
kvrrd kvrrd is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: May 2006
Location: simi valley, california
Posts: 401
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 4 Posts
kvrrd has disabled reputation
I see the flicker in lamps too. I worked with multiple monitors, the development one and various targets. I put them at different heights and distances so that my eyes can shift and change focal lengths. It REALLY helps with eye stress. I end up seeing the beats running through tv signals - and staring up close for pixel registration and color saturation, etc. Helps with developing animation too.
Night driving and lights bug me a lot - way more now than ever before.
I also got dedicated pair of prescription glasses with the focal point adjusted a few feet out that I use for computer work and so I end up doing the glasses switcheroo a lot.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-09-06, 08:22 PM
dormammau2008's Avatar
dormammau2008 dormammau2008 is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: near birmingham in the uk
Posts: 1,859
Thanks: 58
Thanked 171 Times in 124 Posts
dormammau2008 has disabled reputation
hey anmura an kvrrd yes iam very setive to all light ssound touch tast clours soooo meny diff thingss and like you i see very well in dark yes i see beats as well an the chprb bugs me an low sound on mast gets to me dorm
__________________
power flows to the one who knows how if. I alone is not enough
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-10-08, 12:20 PM
bandie08's Avatar
bandie08 bandie08 is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 243
Thanks: 8
Thanked 21 Times in 16 Posts
bandie08 will become famous soon enough
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

the only light im sensitive to is florescent light
__________________


Trumpet + ADHD = Fun
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-11-08, 01:34 AM
dormammau2008's Avatar
dormammau2008 dormammau2008 is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: near birmingham in the uk
Posts: 1,859
Thanks: 58
Thanked 171 Times in 124 Posts
dormammau2008 has disabled reputation
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

all light iam

dorm
__________________
power flows to the one who knows how if. I alone is not enough
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-13-08, 01:13 PM
stormpje stormpje is offline
Newbie
 

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: the netherlands
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
stormpje is on a distinguished road
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

i'm also sensitive for light but for the biggest part for sun light. when the sun shines i'm getting tired, my eyes feel weird, I get tears in my eyes.
but i haven't that much symtoms from the irlen syndrome. i think i'm just high sensitive for light (and a lot of other things)
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-13-08, 01:29 PM
speedo's Avatar
speedo speedo is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 4,458
Thanks: 54
Thanked 517 Times in 287 Posts
speedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud of
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

If you dig down and research it on the net you eventually find that irlen syndrome is pseudoscience. However, the fact that some people are sensitive to light is a solid fact, indeed.

I did have a friend in college who had a genetic defect that rendered her totally color blind. It also left her extremely nearsighted and sensitive to strong lighting.
She wore cheap sunglasses all the time, which helped her tolerate her condition better.

ME
__________________
ADHD.... It's not just for kids anymore...
It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
"Sig personnas illegitum non carborundum." (unknown)
The computer lets you make more mistakes faster, with the exception of tequila and a handgun. (M. Radcliffe)
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-13-08, 02:19 PM
amu_d's Avatar
amu_d amu_d is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 341
Thanks: 163
Thanked 85 Times in 59 Posts
amu_d is on a distinguished road
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

Quote:
Originally Posted by speedo View Post
If you dig down and research it on the net you eventually find that irlen syndrome is pseudoscience. However, the fact that some people are sensitive to light is a solid fact, indeed.

I did have a friend in college who had a genetic defect that rendered her totally color blind. It also left her extremely nearsighted and sensitive to strong lighting.
She wore cheap sunglasses all the time, which helped her tolerate her condition better.

ME
If you could take a guess, what percent of ADD/ADHDers do you think have hypersensitivity to light?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-13-08, 08:49 PM
speedo's Avatar
speedo speedo is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Washington DC
Posts: 4,458
Thanks: 54
Thanked 517 Times in 287 Posts
speedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud ofspeedo has much to be proud of
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

I've read that approximately 20% of people who have adhd have sensory issues.

I know that all of my senses are involved in my hypersensitivity but that hypersensitivity to sound is the one that really bothers me. Others say that touch is a biggie for them.

Based on my experience, I'd venture to guess that most of the ADDer's who are hypersensitive also likely experience at least some issues visually along with tactile and auditory sensitivities.

What I mean to say is that sensory overload is not confined to just one of the senses, but that one sense always seems to dominate.


Me
__________________
ADHD.... It's not just for kids anymore...
It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
"Sig personnas illegitum non carborundum." (unknown)
The computer lets you make more mistakes faster, with the exception of tequila and a handgun. (M. Radcliffe)
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to speedo For This Useful Post:
amu_d (09-13-08)
  #14  
Old 09-13-08, 11:26 PM
amu_d's Avatar
amu_d amu_d is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 341
Thanks: 163
Thanked 85 Times in 59 Posts
amu_d is on a distinguished road
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

Quote:
Originally Posted by speedo View Post
I've read that approximately 20% of people who have adhd have sensory issues.

I know that all of my senses are involved in my hypersensitivity but that hypersensitivity to sound is the one that really bothers me. Others say that touch is a biggie for them.

Based on my experience, I'd venture to guess that most of the ADDer's who are hypersensitive also likely experience at least some issues visually along with tactile and auditory sensitivities.

What I mean to say is that sensory overload is not confined to just one of the senses, but that one sense always seems to dominate.


Me
I have hypersensitivity too, but in my case it's emotional hypersensitivity. As an analogy, it's the type of hypersensitivity people with Bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder experience.

Many times I've been able to almost "become" the person, it's really creepy and limits my social life. Many times I find myself at home and not meeting people because I overload if I do.

It's the exact same problem you have. Except replace "bright light" with "the conscious of others." The physical presence of others causes me to go into overdrive. This is the cause of my agoraphobia as well.

One of my doctors was afraid I might be at risk for psychosis, because my experiences have been more extreme than those experienced by most ADD/ADHDers.

My life would be much better if I decide to take a mood stabilizer. BUT I can't take a mood stabilizer due to the side effects. If you know of a "light" mood stabilizer that gets the job done without adverse short term or long term side effects, please let me know.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-16-08, 01:48 AM
Michellee7 Michellee7 is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 29
Thanks: 22
Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Michellee7 is on a distinguished road
Re: Hypersensitive to light ? Read this!

I can completely relate to what you are saying. I have light and audio sensitivities. I have never in my entire life been able to figure out why. The fact that it is being related to ADD is one of the reasons I joined this site. The information here has been amazing.

I recently had a hearing test done at work, results were great. However, the fact that so many sounds drive me absolutely bonkers isn't as great. What most people consider as acceptable noise, makes me very edgy. Plus the fact that background noise makes it impossible for me to focus on anything.

Years ago, when i explained to my eye doctor, my sensitivity to light and difficulty at night with bright lights, she just chalked it up as "it's my system". I never really grasped her explanation. She said it was neurological. Yet I have wonderful vision. I constantly wear anti-glare glasses when on the computer and driving at night. Helps big time! Ear plugs have been great too :O) Hard to meet men though, when you have large orange plugs hanging out your ears! Sorry.....just my attempt at being funny :O)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Attention Deficit Disorder and when did u start to talk and read? Avistar_sg General ADD Talk 46 12-08-14 06:47 PM
ADHD? Able To Read? sgolden5374 General ADD Talk 66 09-21-07 12:26 PM
Light sleep better than deep? Jackinbox Sleeping 0 05-19-06 06:36 PM
Choices of Light and Dark Nova Chit-Chat 0 10-01-05 02:56 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums