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  #1  
Old 05-13-12, 06:48 PM
alexrv alexrv is offline
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No motivation...just stuck?

Hey everyone,
Well this is my first post here and Iím excited to have finally joined.

Anyways, Iíve been suffering with problems for the last few years and I finally want to take action and do something about it. Now, Iím no expert but judging from how Iím living my life at the moment I believe that I have some form of ADHD. By the way, I'm 22 years old in my last year of University.

The main issue for me is that I have a lot of trouble getting things done. I find that I constantly have a lack of motivation to do things. Even as I try and type this post Iím constantly distracted and itís actually miracle that Iím even typing this up. (Edit, it took me about an hour to type this).
I know that I have a lot of potential, and have showed this before, but at times itís as if my brain is limiting me from excelling in life. Donít get me wrong, I do great in school and get really good grades, but I feel I have absolutely no motivation. I started my own online business when I was 16 years old and luckily I have a good amount of money saved up. But even with all the money I still feel that Iím not happy. Itís not that Iím sad or depressed, but I just have not motivation to do anything. I know that I have the capacity to expand and grow my online business and do a plethora of other productive things, but for now Iím just stuck. I feel as though my brain is so cluttered. I get so many ideas and I know that if I actually took action I could succeed in life.


In addition, my parents have been recently fighting with me to get a summer job or an internship and itís literally an impossible task for me to go out and apply. Little things like that are so hard for me to do. Even going shopping or getting an oil change is a difficult task for me and I end up doing things until the last second.


I really donít know what else to say. My mind is so cluttered and typing this up is proving to be a very difficult task.


So what do you guys say? Opinions?


Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-13-12, 10:46 PM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

Welcome!!

Since you are in university, can you get evaluated through the school's health center?
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Old 05-13-12, 11:09 PM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

Felt like I was reading my own bio so I'd be a major hypocrite to give you any advice but I will recommend you do whatever your interested in if you're not sure than do the internship or try and get someone you know to get you into a job the secret is not to be picky I missed many opportunities because of this don't wanna give you more pressure but the longer you don't do anything the worse it gets.
Also you don't do anything because of anxiety be sure to look into that if you haven't already.
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Old 05-14-12, 12:00 PM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

I'm in a very similar situation, only difference is that I wasted more years at uni because of this and that I've been diagnosed with ADHD at a young age.

Tasks that should be easy to accomplish feel like an impossible obstacle to take. I have a million things I want to do, but none of them got done, possibly because they can't hold my attention for a prolonged period.

It's a good thing that you started looking for help, because you need it. I waited way too long and I wasted alot of years while things just got worse and worse. I feel like it's impossible or atleast very hard to combat ADHD on your own without any form of professional help or medication. It's not always easy to admit that you need help, but this is something real and not something you can just ignore and get over with.

My advice, find out if you really had ADHD, here in Belgium it's a simple test they can perform, allthough it's not that cheap. And if you do, find a specialist that can help you. In my experience, without meds or help I'm capable of doing nothing for an entire year, and the more I procrastinate, the worse it gets.

Wish you the best with it!
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Old 05-14-12, 01:34 PM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?





Check out this red stuff that I copied\pasted, and go here for more stuff about dopamine and wanting:

Helen Phillips
The pleasure seekers
New Scientist, 11 October 2003
"At first glance, the "reward centre" idea seems hard to fault. The self-stimulation experiments, beginning with rats in the 1950s and followed by the human experiments in the 1960s, seemed perfectly clear. Modern brain-imaging studies have confirmed that the centre works overtime whenever you're enjoying something, whether it's sex or chocolate, drugs or music. And chemical analysis shows that, whatever your pleasure, dopamine fuels the circuit. "Dopamine was the pleasure transmitter," says Berridge. "The evidence seemed so strong. If you shut down dopamine signalling by giving a drug that blocks dopamine receptors, you dilute the reward value of everything." So why did he and others begin to question the status quo?

Berridge reckons that his doubts began to creep in around the late 1980s, with a few surprise results. He'd found that he could watch rats' facial expressions to judge their reactions to certain tastes. Believe it or not, rats actually look pleased when given sweet things to taste, and produce the rat equivalent of a disgusted look in response to bitterness. The assumption was that these expressions were of pleasure or displeasure, mediated by the reward centre. The surprise came when Berridge blocked the dopamine signal with drugs. In theory, with dopamine knocked out there was now no way for the rats to sense the reward value of the sweetness, so he was expecting not to see any "pleased" expressions. But the rats seemed just as expressive as ever.
Putting it down to experimental error, Berridge tried a more foolproof test. He used rats in which dopamine-producing cells had been wiped out with a neurotoxin. It was already known that these animals simply stopped eating. "They would voluntarily starve to death if the experimenter didn't intervene and feed them," says Berridge. Researchers had always thought that the rats' lack of dopamine meant they didn't like food. But when Berridge force-fed them with sweet and bitter liquids, their facial reactions were normal. "They still showed the proper positive face to sugar and the proper negative face to quinine," he says. "It looked like their reaction to pleasure was normal even though their dopamine was gone."
What was going on? The experiments prompted Berridge to look back at Heath's brain electrode results. He was struck this time by what feelings the subjects reported. They all said they felt good, and always pleaded for more when the controls were taken away. But was it pleasure? The reports mentioned feelings of alertness, warmth and goodwill, arousal, a desire to masturbate, or to drink even though they weren't thirsty. It sounded more like desire than pleasure. This fitted perfectly with Berridge's rats. Even with no activity in the reward area, they seemed to "like" the taste of sweet food. They just didn't "want" it. Could the dopamine system be a desire circuit that mediates our feelings of wanting something, rather than a pleasure centre that supplies our feelings of liking?
Although it was Berridge who drew attention to the distinction between wanting and liking, he is by no means the only researcher to realise that "pleasure" is not quite the right term to attach to activity in the dopamine system. If people are given drugs that block or stimulate dopamine release, it doesn't alter how much they report liking certain tastes. What that suggests is that the dopamine system itself doesn't produce feelings of pleasure, says Panksepp. "The dopamine system is about motivation and seeking. It gives a generalised desire or urge, an eagerness to engage with the world."
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Old 05-15-12, 11:31 AM
mrtbonesteak mrtbonesteak is offline
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

Wow! I'm not convinced of the text you pasted, but those vids are great.
A knowledgable doctor who knows how serious this disorder is, who would have thought!

Thanks for the link!
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Old 05-21-12, 01:05 PM
alexrv alexrv is offline
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

Thanks for the reply guys. I did not realize my thread was moved into another forum so I finally got a chance to reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by finallyfound10 View Post
Welcome!!

Since you are in university, can you get evaluated through the school's health center?
Thanks for the reply. I will check with my University to see if that can be done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clouded-Mind View Post
Felt like I was reading my own bio so I'd be a major hypocrite to give you any advice but I will recommend you do whatever your interested in if you're not sure than do the internship or try and get someone you know to get you into a job the secret is not to be picky I missed many opportunities because of this don't wanna give you more pressure but the longer you don't do anything the worse it gets.
Also you don't do anything because of anxiety be sure to look into that if you haven't already.
Thanks for the reply. At the moment I'm finishing up my resume (after constant pressure from my parents) and will finally start applying (hopefully). You mentioned that you felt like you were reading your own bio, are you current diagnosed with ADD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtbonesteak View Post
I'm in a very similar situation, only difference is that I wasted more years at uni because of this and that I've been diagnosed with ADHD at a young age.

Tasks that should be easy to accomplish feel like an impossible obstacle to take. I have a million things I want to do, but none of them got done, possibly because they can't hold my attention for a prolonged period.

It's a good thing that you started looking for help, because you need it. I waited way too long and I wasted alot of years while things just got worse and worse. I feel like it's impossible or atleast very hard to combat ADHD on your own without any form of professional help or medication. It's not always easy to admit that you need help, but this is something real and not something you can just ignore and get over with.

My advice, find out if you really had ADHD, here in Belgium it's a simple test they can perform, allthough it's not that cheap. And if you do, find a specialist that can help you. In my experience, without meds or help I'm capable of doing nothing for an entire year, and the more I procrastinate, the worse it gets.

Wish you the best with it!
I feel exactly the same way! I feel like years have passed and I have gotten by buy just accomplishing the bare minimum when I could have gotten out in the real world and accomplished a whole host of things.

I will definitely look into getting diagnosed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaughingRats View Post




Check out this red stuff that I copied\pasted, and go here for more stuff about dopamine and wanting:

Helen Phillips
The pleasure seekers
New Scientist, 11 October 2003
"At first glance, the "reward centre" idea seems hard to fault. The self-stimulation experiments, beginning with rats in the 1950s and followed by the human experiments in the 1960s, seemed perfectly clear. Modern brain-imaging studies have confirmed that the centre works overtime whenever you're enjoying something, whether it's sex or chocolate, drugs or music. And chemical analysis shows that, whatever your pleasure, dopamine fuels the circuit. "Dopamine was the pleasure transmitter," says Berridge. "The evidence seemed so strong. If you shut down dopamine signalling by giving a drug that blocks dopamine receptors, you dilute the reward value of everything." So why did he and others begin to question the status quo?

Berridge reckons that his doubts began to creep in around the late 1980s, with a few surprise results. He'd found that he could watch rats' facial expressions to judge their reactions to certain tastes. Believe it or not, rats actually look pleased when given sweet things to taste, and produce the rat equivalent of a disgusted look in response to bitterness. The assumption was that these expressions were of pleasure or displeasure, mediated by the reward centre. The surprise came when Berridge blocked the dopamine signal with drugs. In theory, with dopamine knocked out there was now no way for the rats to sense the reward value of the sweetness, so he was expecting not to see any "pleased" expressions. But the rats seemed just as expressive as ever.
Putting it down to experimental error, Berridge tried a more foolproof test. He used rats in which dopamine-producing cells had been wiped out with a neurotoxin. It was already known that these animals simply stopped eating. "They would voluntarily starve to death if the experimenter didn't intervene and feed them," says Berridge. Researchers had always thought that the rats' lack of dopamine meant they didn't like food. But when Berridge force-fed them with sweet and bitter liquids, their facial reactions were normal. "They still showed the proper positive face to sugar and the proper negative face to quinine," he says. "It looked like their reaction to pleasure was normal even though their dopamine was gone."
What was going on? The experiments prompted Berridge to look back at Heath's brain electrode results. He was struck this time by what feelings the subjects reported. They all said they felt good, and always pleaded for more when the controls were taken away. But was it pleasure? The reports mentioned feelings of alertness, warmth and goodwill, arousal, a desire to masturbate, or to drink even though they weren't thirsty. It sounded more like desire than pleasure. This fitted perfectly with Berridge's rats. Even with no activity in the reward area, they seemed to "like" the taste of sweet food. They just didn't "want" it. Could the dopamine system be a desire circuit that mediates our feelings of wanting something, rather than a pleasure centre that supplies our feelings of liking?
Although it was Berridge who drew attention to the distinction between wanting and liking, he is by no means the only researcher to realise that "pleasure" is not quite the right term to attach to activity in the dopamine system. If people are given drugs that block or stimulate dopamine release, it doesn't alter how much they report liking certain tastes. What that suggests is that the dopamine system itself doesn't produce feelings of pleasure, says Panksepp. "The dopamine system is about motivation and seeking. It gives a generalised desire or urge, an eagerness to engage with the world."
Thanks for this, I will definitely check out these videos.
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Old 06-03-12, 09:03 PM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

Yeah got diagnosed last year I'm taking Ritalin which I find makes me more productive, good to hear your doing something keep up the good work and try to live the life you want.
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Old 06-04-12, 05:33 AM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

I read this post hoping to get advice myself as I need more tools to manage this problem better.

The one tool I do have I think might help you bc it gets me some traction to get unstuck in the specific situation you described: unmotivated w/ your mind clogged with too many unorganized thoughts.

I go on a writing rampage, I scribble it all out with the emphasis on keeping up with the pace of my thoughts and sacrificing neatness, organization & precision in word choice and grammar.

I find that the process allows my brain to somehow distill and summarize
my thoughts. As I write, I always think I'll want to reread them but never end up needing to bc my brain holds on easily to the concise key points and sheds the rest.

Congrats on your business and good luck to you!
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Old 06-04-12, 06:48 AM
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Re: No motivation...just stuck?

I can relate too, alot of it is a feeling like "what are all things I have to do and what do I do first?".

I remember even before graduating from high school, it overwhelmed me to think of all the responsibilities of being an adult and wondering how I'd manage to do them all.

In college I was really confused on how to even start or finish research paper and assignments relating a course to current events. Thus, I flunked two classes in my first semester in college.

I never bothered to seek for a permit to drive and learn to drive, because I couldn't afford a car anyway.

The thought of getting a job didn't even cross my mind after I had finished high school.

I had moved around a lot, I grew up in NY, lived near Atlanta for a year and a half, then moved to Pennsylvania. By that point, my parents had moved around so much I felt like it was pointless to "settle down" and even have any control of my life.

I graduated from high school in Queens, NY, started college there, then moved back to Pennsylvania. I'm still stuck with my parents and it's really difficult because my mom suffers from schizophrenia and recently had brain surgery and can't walk well. She has no close family, she only has me and my dad to take care of her (my dad's family is in Peru). Oh, did I also mention that I'm an only child?

Also add to this that I have very few friends, and moving around alot makes it difficult to keep close friends. I rarely even talk to my friends on facebook because it gets boring really fast: the other person might be too busy or I feel like I'm the only one talking (my conversations can feel a bit one-sided).

I think it's especially hard to feel motivated when there's no one really close in my life to motivate me to do anything.
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