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Old 03-09-03, 09:07 PM
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Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

*marked impairment in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body postures, and gestures to regulate social interaction
*failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
*a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interests, or achievements with other people (e.g., by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
*lack of social or emotional reciprocity

Restricted repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

*encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
*apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
*stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g., hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

The disturbance causes clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

There is no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g., single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years).

There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self-help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction), and curiosity about the environment in childhood.

Criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or Schizophrenia.

Criteria summarized from:
American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

From Mental Help Net
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  #2  
Old 01-29-07, 09:43 AM
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Old 01-29-07, 09:51 AM
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I know I fit the bill since I have the dx for 5 years and was confirmed by 6 differnt doctors.
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Old 01-29-07, 09:51 AM
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I was dx'd in 2002...
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Old 05-21-07, 12:32 PM
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All in the family?

I am a "grandma" aged person diagnosed with ADHD a few years ago. I received good counselling and I take Ritalin, but I still have big problems accomplishing things.

I could trace a line back to my mother and her hyperactivity and impulsiveness. Who knew so many years ago--50--about diagnosis and treatment?

Today I received an email from my sister's adult daughter. She has a son with autism (now 9 years old). She also has a son who is 6, and has just been diagnosed as having Asbergers. Why did it take so long? The first boy was diagnosed at 2. I had visited them two summers ago, and the older boy, affectionate and quiet, was the one who needed full-time attention and one-on-one guidance. The younger one was a sweet, curious, demonstrably affectionate, social kid. Is he changing?

This family has the resources to deal with this financially, but I know it is going to take even more of their dedication and understanding.

Maybe these differences are genetically related.(?)
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Old 05-21-07, 05:36 PM
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I don't know enough to tell you why your nephiew was only recently diagnosed with aspergers syndrome. However I can speculate a little.

First of all, it is commonly held that the majority of people who have aspergers syndrome are never diagnosed. Secondly, the milder the symptoms the less likely it is that it will ever be diagnosed. Furthermore, the older the patient gets the more reluctant the medical profession is to diagnose aspergers syndrome.

Basically, if you do not have compelling symptoms and/or were not diagnosed at an early age, there is a fair chance you never will be diagnosed with aspergers syndrome.

I suspect that the very mild cases are hardest to diagnose, and to make it more difficult, aspergers syndrome can be difficult to distinguish from adhd in some people... particularly in children, and even more so in children who do not have obviously compelling autistic traits.

I doubt that he is changing, but there is most likely some observed set of traits that caused the doctor to diagnose aspergers syndrome.

The child may be very social, he may have a strong desire to be social (or not). A lot depends on the person. One of the key problems is an impairment on nonverbal communications.... meaning that the AS child might not be very able socially regardless of the desire to be social.

Aspergers is most likely genetic in origin and it is something that a person either does or does not have. It can be mild, or severe.. the expressed traits of AS vary a lot from one person to the next and it can be hard for doctors to diagnose.

I hope this helps
Me

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace
I am a "grandma" aged person diagnosed with ADHD a few years ago. I received good counselling and I take Ritalin, but I still have big problems accomplishing things.

I could trace a line back to my mother and her hyperactivity and impulsiveness. Who knew so many years ago--50--about diagnosis and treatment?

Today I received an email from my sister's adult daughter. She has a son with autism (now 9 years old). She also has a son who is 6, and has just been diagnosed as having Asbergers. Why did it take so long? The first boy was diagnosed at 2. I had visited them two summers ago, and the older boy, affectionate and quiet, was the one who needed full-time attention and one-on-one guidance. The younger one was a sweet, curious, demonstrably affectionate, social kid. Is he changing?

This family has the resources to deal with this financially, but I know it is going to take even more of their dedication and understanding.

Maybe these differences are genetically related.(?)
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Last edited by speedo; 05-21-07 at 06:00 PM..
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Old 05-25-07, 01:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace
She also has a son who is 6, and has just been diagnosed as having Asbergers. Why did it take so long? ....

Maybe these differences are genetically related.(?)
Dr. Piven recently lectured at the M.I.N.D. institute regarding autism (this and other great lectures available for view at http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindins...ed_events.html). One of the things that caught my attention was their decription of autism-like traits ("Broad Autism Phenotype", or BAP) in family members that do not have diagnosable autism but are described by others as very logical, somewhat rigid in their thinking, etc.

Recent studies have reported that siblings of autistic children have more difficulty with communication and recognizing facial cues than children from general population sampling. Determining whether these children actually fit into an asperger's or other autism-spectrum diagnosis, simply have some traits in that direction, or are responding to their environment, doesn't seem to be easy.

The good news is that 6 is still an excellent age to be diagnosed with aspergers, young enough to learn a second language--in this case, a social language--with far greater ease than an older child, and at a great spot to start identifying any sensory or other issues and developing skills to work with them.

Personally, I think any child with BAP traits or autistic-spectrum disorders in their family (including grandparents, aunts, and uncles) would benefit from this same type of training, whether they have inherited some autistic traits or not. Whether we personally inherit the genes or just learn the 'accent' from our familial interactions, early training goes a long way toward using the best from both worlds.
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Old 09-28-08, 08:09 PM
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Re: All in the family?

One of the differences between autism and asperger's disorder is the age of onset. That is, asperger's may not be apparent in an individual until they are past the age of 4 or so, and in some cases older. Everything I've read says you can't diagnose aspergers earlier than age 4.
But autism can be diagnosed earlier because the delays are apparent at an earlier age.

ME

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace View Post
I am a "grandma" aged person diagnosed with ADHD a few years ago. I received good counselling and I take Ritalin, but I still have big problems accomplishing things.

I could trace a line back to my mother and her hyperactivity and impulsiveness. Who knew so many years ago--50--about diagnosis and treatment?

Today I received an email from my sister's adult daughter. She has a son with autism (now 9 years old). She also has a son who is 6, and has just been diagnosed as having Asbergers. Why did it take so long? The first boy was diagnosed at 2. I had visited them two summers ago, and the older boy, affectionate and quiet, was the one who needed full-time attention and one-on-one guidance. The younger one was a sweet, curious, demonstrably affectionate, social kid. Is he changing?

This family has the resources to deal with this financially, but I know it is going to take even more of their dedication and understanding.

Maybe these differences are genetically related.(?)
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It all seems impressive when you don't know what it means. (H. Rickey, 1987)
"Aye yam what aye yam." (Popeye)
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Old 01-16-12, 09:19 PM
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Re: All in the family?

Quote:
Originally Posted by speedo View Post
One of the differences between autism and asperger's disorder is the age of onset. That is, asperger's may not be apparent in an individual until they are past the age of 4 or so, and in some cases older. Everything I've read says you can't diagnose aspergers earlier than age 4.
But autism can be diagnosed earlier because the delays are apparent at an earlier age.

ME
My son (13) was dx at 5 and his neurologist said that before the age of 4 that they can not make the dx of Aspergers because it would just be PDD or Autism Spectrum. Aspergers children have normal language skills just have other autistic traits. HTH
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Old 04-28-15, 09:34 AM
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Re: All in the family?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ace View Post
I am a "grandma" aged person diagnosed with ADHD a few years ago. I received good counselling and I take Ritalin, but I still have big problems accomplishing things.

I could trace a line back to my mother and her hyperactivity and impulsiveness. Who knew so many years ago--50--about diagnosis and treatment?

Today I received an email from my sister's adult daughter. She has a son with autism (now 9 years old). She also has a son who is 6, and has just been diagnosed as having Asbergers. Why did it take so long? The first boy was diagnosed at 2. I had visited them two summers ago, and the older boy, affectionate and quiet, was the one who needed full-time attention and one-on-one guidance. The younger one was a sweet, curious, demonstrably affectionate, social kid. Is he changing?

This family has the resources to deal with this financially, but I know it is going to take even more of their dedication and understanding.

Maybe these differences are genetically related.(?)
i was diagnosed at 24, if diagnosed with adhd pi as a child well things could have been very diifferent.
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Old 07-22-08, 08:09 PM
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Re: Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

Diagnosed with Autism and ADHD when I was 4.
Non verbal until 4 1/2
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Old 09-28-08, 02:31 PM
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Re: Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

Can some one tell me if this is a symptom of aspergers?

ok a while back i had shoulder surgury. now i always wanna strech it out over and over again. i prolly do it about 40-50 times. So whats my problem
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Old 09-28-08, 08:28 PM
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Re: Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

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Originally Posted by ikgbixcal View Post
Can some one tell me if this is a symptom of aspergers?

ok a while back i had shoulder surgury. now i always wanna strech it out over and over again. i prolly do it about 40-50 times. So whats my problem
Does your shoulder hurt?
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Old 11-23-12, 12:43 AM
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Re: Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

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Originally Posted by Imnapl View Post
Does your shoulder hurt?
rotator cuff problems? My mum had a problems with that.

The most common symptoms of a rotator cuff tear include:

Pain at rest and at night, particularly if lying on the affected shoulder
Pain when lifting and lowering your arm or with specific movements
Weakness when lifting or rotating your arm
Crepitus or crackling sensation when moving your shoulder in certain positions

When one or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the head of the humerus. Most tears occur in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon, but other parts of the rotator cuff may also be involved.

In many cases, torn tendons begin by fraying. As the damage progresses, the tendon can completely tear, sometimes with lifting a heavy object.

There are different types of tears.

Partial Tear. This type of tear damages the soft tissue, but does not completely sever it.
Full-Thickness Tear. This type of tear is also called a complete tear. It splits the soft tissue into two pieces. In many cases, tendons tear off where they attach to the head of the humerus. With a full-thickness tear, there is basically a hole in the tendon.


Acute Tear
If you fall down on your outstretched arm or lift something too heavy with a jerking motion, you can tear your rotator cuff. This type of tear can occur with other shoulder injuries, such as a broken collarbone or dislocated shoulder.

Degenerative Tear
Most tears are the result of a wearing down of the tendon that occurs slowly over time. This degeneration naturally occurs as we age. Rotator cuff tears are more common in the dominant arm. If you have a degenerative tear in one shoulder, there is a greater risk for a rotator cuff tear in the opposite shoulder -- even if you have no pain in that shoulder.

Several factors contribute to degenerative, or chronic, rotator cuff tears.

Repetitive stress. Repeating the same shoulder motions again and again can stress your rotator cuff muscles and tendons. Baseball, tennis, rowing, and weightlifting are examples of sports activities that can put you at risk for overuse tears. Many jobs and routine chores can cause overuse tears, as well.
Lack of blood supply. As we get older, the blood supply in our rotator cuff tendons lessens. Without a good blood supply, the body's natural ability to repair tendon damage is impaired. This can ultimately lead to a tendon tear.
Bone spurs. As we age, bone spurs (bone overgrowth) often develop on the underside of the acromion bone. When we lift our arms, the spurs rub on the rotator cuff tendon. This condition is called shoulder impingement, and over time will weaken the tendon and make it more likely to tear.
Risk Factors
Because most rotator cuff tears are largely caused by the normal wear and tear that goes along with aging, people over 40 are at greater risk.

People who do repetitive lifting or overhead activities are also at risk for rotator cuff tears. Athletes are especially vulnerable to overuse tears, particularly tennis players and baseball pitchers. Painters, carpenters, and others who do overhead work also have a greater chance for tears.

Although overuse tears caused by sports activity or overhead work also occur in younger people, most tears in young adults are caused by a traumatic injury, like a fall.
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Old 03-05-14, 08:47 PM
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Wink Re: Asperger's Disorder Symptoms

[quote=ikgbixcal;644379]Can some one tell me if this is a symptom of aspergers?

ok a while back i had shoulder surgury. now i always wanna strech it out over and over again. i prolly do it about 40-50 times. So whats my problem


Sounds like a pretty understandable thing to do after maybe having it confined in a sling for a while and probably good for your arm muscles too !
Unless you are having other symptoms I'd say don't worry about it too much. maybe try doing it a little less each time to slowly break the habit....Good luck.
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