ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community  

Go Back   ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community > ADULTS AND ADD/ADHD > Adult Diagnosis & Treatment
Register Blogs FAQ Chat Members List Calendar Donate Gallery Arcade Mark Forums Read

Adult Diagnosis & Treatment This forum is for the discussion of issues related to the diagnosis of AD/HD

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-23-09, 09:10 PM
Aquablue Aquablue is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New York, New York
Posts: 127
Thanks: 138
Thanked 175 Times in 78 Posts
Aquablue has a spectacular aura aboutAquablue has a spectacular aura about
Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Is there anyone who was dxed with Add who feels they now have Adhd?

Or anyone who was dxed with Adhd who feels they now have Add?

I was dxed. at 37 with Add, based on childhood hx. as well as cognitive and auditory testing. The psychologist only wished to focus on history prior to age 12. It centered around inattentiveness at school, inattention to simple activities like walking (got lost a lot) and keeping to myself because I didn't understand why people were the way they were.

Between 5 -12, I was heavy. At 12, I was 165 lbs. which was 40 lbs. over so I guess I was obese. (To family, I was "pleasingly plump" though nothing was pleasing about the shame I felt). Also, puberty came early, at 10, which magnified my embarassment and had me accepting wallflower status. To sum it up, there was nothing "active" about me prior to 12, let alone hyperactive.

At 13, 50 lbs. peeled off without effort. Along with weight loss came a big increase in physicality. I wasn't athletic in the conventional sense, was clutzy, but needed to move with great frequency. In high school I'd cut class often not because I wished to be disrespectful but because my legs were so restless after sitting 2 hours it felt like slow torture to have 4 consecutive classes. In my 20s I did high impact aerobics every morning, which enabled me to get through college. In my 30s til now, 48, I either run or walk briskly on mornings of days I'll have to sit more than 2 hrs. at work. It has nothing to do with compulsion/psychological need for exercise. I've never cared for running itself, just got used to it for the benefit of being able to sit comfortably like other people do. Ritalin has not helped with this at all.

One other sign of hyperactivity after 12 was there were scattered instances that I'd act impulsively, as though my body would act and my brain would process the event after. Once at 15, I was sitting by a lake with 2 friends and a group of *****y girls came by and one in particular who was a horrid gossip snickered and I jumped up and pushed her so hard she went reeling into the water. I wasn't under the influence of anything. It was just my body informing my mind that the girl deserved a good shove.

Does anyone have a similar experience where they feel they were diagnosed with Add or Adhd and now have the other? Or an opinion on whether this is a common or not? Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-24-09, 12:27 AM
timtam's Avatar
timtam timtam is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 108
Thanks: 60
Thanked 156 Times in 53 Posts
timtam is a jewel in the roughtimtam is a jewel in the roughtimtam is a jewel in the rough
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

supposedly it's not uncommon for children diagnosed with predominently hyperactive-impulsive subtype of ADHD to become less hyperactive as they grow older, so i guess those children could be seen as moving from the (HI) hyperactive-impulsive or (C) combined subtype to the (I) inattentive subtype. but i think that just highlights the limitations of those categories.

in my situation, i don't fit neatly into the categories of ADHD. while i am predominantly inattentive type, i am or was also impulsive. yet, i was never hyperactive. so the three subtypes of ADHD used in the DSM IV have limited value in categorizing my condition. and the term hyperkinetic disorder used in the ICD-10) seems way off.

but to address your question specifically: i personally didn't noticed any dramatic change in my behaviour/symptoms over the years (except after getting diagnosed and treated of course).
__________________
Tim's "marks will be much lower than they should be and I cannot understand how he can take such a short sighted and juvenile approach to life. At least he cannot say he was not warned" (Housemaster's report Year 12)
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to timtam For This Useful Post:
Aquablue (03-24-09), Dizfriz (03-29-09)
  #3  
Old 03-24-09, 12:49 AM
stillfightin stillfightin is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 455
Thanks: 38
Thanked 77 Times in 59 Posts
stillfightin will become famous soon enough
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

I thought ADD and ADHD are the same and used interchangeably?
__________________
Past: Adderall XR, Fish Oil, 5-HTP
Current: Focus Fast (01/09)
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #4  
Old 03-24-09, 01:02 AM
timtam's Avatar
timtam timtam is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 108
Thanks: 60
Thanked 156 Times in 53 Posts
timtam is a jewel in the roughtimtam is a jewel in the roughtimtam is a jewel in the rough
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Quote:
Originally Posted by stillfightin View Post
I thought ADD and ADHD are the same and used interchangeably?

some people do use the terms interchangeably. other people, such as my GP, use the term ADD to describe the inattentive type of ADHD. the condition has gone through several changes in name and categorization



Quote:
successive editions of the DSM have revised the diagnostic criteria and subtyping associated with ADHD. DSM-II (APA, 1968) recognised a disorder known as Hyperkinetic Disorder of Childhood with hyperactivity as the principal symptom. DSM-III described operational criteria for diagnostic categories of ADD with and without hyperactivity, with a requirement for three inattentive, three impulsive and two hyperactive symptoms to be present to attain a diagnosis. This distinction was abolished in the revised edition that described a single list of 14
items incorporating symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, with an eight-item cut off for diagnosis. This change implied that symptoms of ADHD were on a continuum from low to high numbers of symptoms. DSM-IV, based on factor analysis of field trials, returned to a categorical classification describing three subtypes of ADHD
Fitzgerald, Michael, Bellgrove, Mark and Gill, Michael (2007). Handbook of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.
__________________
Tim's "marks will be much lower than they should be and I cannot understand how he can take such a short sighted and juvenile approach to life. At least he cannot say he was not warned" (Housemaster's report Year 12)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-24-09, 01:52 AM
ginniebean's Avatar
ginniebean ginniebean is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11,786
Blog Entries: 27
Thanks: 22,964
Thanked 21,934 Times in 7,992 Posts
ginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond reputeginniebean has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Here's my take, it's the same thing.. plus or minus.. I think we all have some of the hyperactivity, whether internalized or externalized and it can possibly come out at times, same for the inattentiveness, and the impulsivity. I was always all three.

so say on one day you are -----|----- above the line that demarcates the H and most of the time you are below. Same for impulsivity and inattentiveness.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ginniebean For This Useful Post:
Aquablue (03-29-09)
  #6  
Old 03-29-09, 07:50 AM
meadd823's Avatar
meadd823 meadd823 is offline
Super Meowaderator
 

Join Date: May 2004
Location: address unknown
Posts: 20,882
Blog Entries: 38
Thanks: 6,844
Thanked 15,415 Times in 6,122 Posts
meadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond reputemeadd823 has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Technically there is no ADD - it is all ADHD

{Modified from the following posting}

Diagnostic Criteria for ADHD

1. ADHD, Combined Type: if both criteria 1A and 1B are met for the past 6 months.

2. ADHD, Predominantly Inattentive Type: if criterion 1A is met but criterion 1B is not met for the past six months.

3. ADHD, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: if Criterion 1B is met but Criterion 1A is not met for the past six months.


DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
I. Either A or B:

1A. Six or more of the following symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months to a point that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

Inattention

1. Often does not give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.
2. Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities.
3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
4. Often does not follow instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).
5. Often has trouble organizing activities.
6. Often avoids, dislikes, or doesn't want to do things that take a lot of mental effort for a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
7. Often loses things needed for tasks and activities (e.g. toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).
8. Is often easily distracted.
9. Is often forgetful in daily activities.


-----------------------------------End of 1A-----------------------------

Below is 1B

1B. Six or more of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

Hyperactivity

1. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat.
2. Often gets up from seat when remaining in seat is expected.
3. Often runs about or climbs when and where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may feel very restless).
4. Often has trouble playing or enjoying leisure activities quietly.
5. Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor".
6. Often talks excessively.

Impulsivity

1. Often blurts out answers before questions have been finished.
2. Often has trouble waiting one's turn.
3. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).

2. Some symptoms that cause impairment were present before age 7 years.
3. Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g. at school/work and at home).
4. There must be clear evidence of significant impairment in social, school, or work functioning.
5. The symptoms do not happen only during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, or other Psychotic Disorder. The symptoms are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g. Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, or a Personality Disorder).

{End of Modification}

Okay if you have six or more symptoms listed in 1A under inattentive but do not have the symptoms listed under 1B you are inattentive ADD

If you have six or more of the symptoms listed under 1B but not those under 1A then you are primarily hyperactive ADHD


If you have symptoms listed in both 1A and 1B then you are combined ADHD - Most will be combined ADHD even many claiming to be inattentive.

If this is confusing don't feel bad many doctors do not get it right either - I preferred ADD with hyperactivity ADD without hyperactivity made ADD life much easier for every one including those diagnosing it


Personally I think we should simplify it even more and just call it CRSS {Can't Remember Sh** Syndrome} and leave the names and all the other confusing crap under a pillow for the tooth fairy
__________________


Follow ADDForums on Twitter & Facebook
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to meadd823 For This Useful Post:
Aquablue (03-29-09)
  #7  
Old 03-29-09, 09:13 AM
Dizfriz Dizfriz is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 4,114
Thanks: 15,830
Thanked 10,438 Times in 3,291 Posts
Dizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond reputeDizfriz has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Sometimes switching is an artifact of the criteria. A person could be one symptom above the line on the hyperactivity/impulsivity scale then fall one below a little later. In the first case the dx would be combined type and the second inattentive. One could go back and forth with this based on how that person was reacting that week or month or year yet the underlying disorder could remain the same.

When an individual is clearly combined or inattentive type, there is no major problem. It is when we near the borderline that it becomes tricky. This is where experience and training kicks in.

This is one reason why an assessment by a well trained individual is important. Just looking at the criteria and not going into depth on the person often does not result in a good diagnosis.

The criteria are due to change in the next DSM but this is what we have for the present.

No diagnosis should be considered as written in concrete. Hard plastic perhaps, but not concrete.


Dizfriz
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Dizfriz For This Useful Post:
Aquablue (03-29-09)
  #8  
Old 03-29-09, 11:22 AM
Aquablue Aquablue is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New York, New York
Posts: 127
Thanks: 138
Thanked 175 Times in 78 Posts
Aquablue has a spectacular aura aboutAquablue has a spectacular aura about
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Thank you for your helpful responses.

On the summary of my assessment in 1997 the psychologist wrote: Attention-Deficit/Inattentive Type. I now see he omitted words and his punctuation was faulty, implying that hyperactivity wasn't relevant.

What's odder to me, considering the info provided by Mead, is that I gave a copy of the summary to a psychiatrist who specializes in attentional disorders and those on the autism spectrum. I recall him saying at our first meeting: "I'd have known you weren't hyperactive even without Dr. _ _ _ _ _'s assessment, based on your academic achievement", either suggesting people who are hyperactive wouldn't have high gpas or they wouldn't be in doctoral programs. It's disarming to think that even he associated the "h" with stigma when in reality, it's all ADHD.

For now, I'll take Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Combined Type and account for any perceived compensation skills by crediting my parents for their unconditional love despite my poor-mediocre abilities in childhood and also, the helpers I've found along the way who affirmed my capacity for growth.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-01-09, 11:06 AM
spinningmind spinningmind is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: U.S.
Posts: 35
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
spinningmind is on a distinguished road
Re: Diagnosis changing from Add to Adhd or vice versa

Yep, my diagnosis switched from inattentive to combined. This was due to switching to a different doctor. Just like someone else mentioned above, I don't fit neatly into one of the three categories of adhd. As a child, I was never hyperactive but I wasn't underactive either like many with inattentive adhd tend to be. I am however impatient and I talk non-stop when around friends and people I know well. Basically, I have found that with people who don't fit neatly into a category, the subtype of adhd you get depends on the doctor you see. The first doctor I saw diagnosed me with inattentive because I did not technically reach the six hyperactive/impulsive symptoms required of a combined diagnosis. The second doctor that I now see diagnosed me with combined type. In this doctor's opinion, if you have some of the hyperactive/impulsive symptoms you are really more similar to combined than inattentive type. The doctor told me that impatience and hyperactivity are two different sides of the same coin. This doctor only gives an inattentive diagnosis for people that truly only have issues with being inattentive and nothing else. Confusing, huh? Basically, I don't really worry about subtype. If people ask, I just tell them I have adhd combined but that I tend to be more closer to the inattentive type than most people with a combined diagnosis.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dodgy diagnosis? (long rant/post) tribalsushi Adult Diagnosis & Treatment 9 09-07-13 01:34 AM
Women and Ad/hd Angie_C Women with ADD/ADHD 12 09-26-11 08:41 AM
Adult and Child ADHD Assessment Centres in UK launter United Kingdom 27 12-20-10 09:05 AM
Sluggish Cognitive Tempo: A seperate disorder from ADHD? yankees440 Science in the Media 18 02-11-09 12:15 AM
Adult ADHD Diagnosis by Neurologist? daisyo75 General ADD Talk 4 08-24-04 08:29 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums