ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community  

Go Back   ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community > ADULTS AND ADD/ADHD > Adult Education
Register Blogs FAQ Chat Members List Calendar Donate Gallery Arcade Mark Forums Read

Adult Education This forum is to discuss issues related to ADD and higher education.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-26-11, 06:09 PM
pechemignonne's Avatar
pechemignonne pechemignonne is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: La Belle Province
Posts: 3,045
Thanks: 4,401
Thanked 4,317 Times in 1,871 Posts
pechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond repute
Good Grades and ADHD?

While most children with ADHD will not do well in school at all, some children and adults with ADHD seem to succeed in academics either sometimes or fairly consistently. Some people question whether someone who has ADHD can get good grades- even if they are not medicated or treated at the time. The answer from the experts is a resounding affirmative. While it may not be the common experience of people with ADHD, it is certainly possible.

Dr. Thomas Brown has studied people with ADHD that have been classified as having "high IQs". He notes:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Thomas Brown, [I
Attention Deficit Disorders and Comorbidities in Children, Adolescents and Adults[/i]]I have evaluated persons with a wide range of intellectual abilities.
Some of my patients diagnosed with ADD are extremely bright, employed
as university professors, research scientists, physicians, attorneys, and
senior executives in business. The intellectual abilities of others are distributed across the high-average, average, and low-average ranges of IQ.
An individual’s overall level of “smarts” as measured by standard IQ tests
appears to have very little to do with whether they meet the diagnostic criteria for ADD.
How is this possible? For one thing, executive functioning is not as expected in early schooling. So, for those children who find some school subjects or teachers interesting, or who are strong readers, the structure of support provided makes it possible for them to succeed to a relative degree (that is, perhaps not to their potential but certainly up to average).

Brown notes that for this reason, children who do well academically may be struggling with ADHD but go unnoticed, so long as their impulsivity and hyperactivity do not interfere too much in the behavioral sphere:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Thomas Brown, [I
Attention Deficit Disorders and Comorbidities in Children, Adolescents and Adults[/i]]Another important fact about executive function is that it becomes progressively more necessary and complex as an individual gets older. Denckla (1996b) suggested that growing up is essentially the development of competence in executive function. Complex tasks such as dealing with multiple courses and different teachers in high school, driving a car, managing finances, and providing day-to-day parenting for children are a few of the many tasks that place strong demands on executive function. The increasing challenges to executive function as an individual matures may explain why inattention symptoms of some individuals with ADDs, particularly those who are bright and not hyperactive, are noticed not in early childhood but in middle to late adolescence or early adulthood, as demands on executive function increase.
Executive function is the key. Many of these children are able to have very high marks in subjects that interest them, but cannot achieve the same with subjects they dislike. Generally, children's grade patterns are fairly consistently either low or moderate or high. But some children with ADHD show extreme disparities. A parent states:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Thomas Brown, [I
Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults[/i]]"We know that Larry is very bright. His IQ test scores show
he’s in the superior range, in the top 3 percent. Usually he scores
high on semester exams and he did very well on the PSAT, but
his day-to-day work and his report card grades are always up and
down, from A+ to almost failing."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Thomas Brown, Attention Deficit Disorders and Comorbidities in Children, Adolescents and Adults
Clinically, parents of these very bright students report
that their son or daughter has always been able to work
very effectively on certain tasks in which they have
strong personal interest. Yet these students who demonstrate strong motivation and impressive cognitive
strengths on those specific tasks that interest them tend
to have much greater difficulty than most of their peers
in trying to make themselves do homework, studying,
and other important tasks that do not, for them, hold the
same intense interest. Many of these students had earned
grades in the A range throughout most of their schooling,
but had been dropping into the low C to D range over the
preceding two years.”
Why can some children with ADHD get As in some classes while failing at others? Because attention has a lot to do with interest. Even someone with severe ADHD inattentiveness symptoms can attend to things that they have interest in. As long as tasks related to the subject are not too sustained or difficult, the child can thus focus on the subject long enough to take in the required information on the subject.

However, getting good grades requires not only having the required knowledge on a subject, but being able to express that knowledge in homework, projects, and tests.

So, the child with ADHD must not only contend with inattention to the subject at the learning stage, whether this is in class or in textbook readings, they must also be able to contend with the inattention at the production phase.

Quote:
“It includes problems of excessive distractibility, procrastination, difficulties in organizing his work, avoidance of tasks requiring sustained mental effort, insufficient attention to details, losing track of belongings, failure to finish assigned tasks, and excessive forgetfulness in daily activities.
What do all of these problems have in common? They are all impairments in facets of “attention”—impairments that are elements of what I
describe in Chapter 2 as “ADD syndrome.”

And all of these chronic difficulties are listed among the inattention symptoms of the disorder ADHD in DSM-IV, the fourth edition of the diagnostic manual published by the American Psychiatric Association (2001). “Inattention” as it is described in DSM-IV is a broad term. Under its umbrella are a wide variety
of cognitive impairments recognized as chronic, but not necessarily constant. The diagnostic manual notes: “Signs of the disorder may be minimal or absent when the person is under very strict control, is in a novel
setting, is engaged in especially interesting activities, is in a one-to-one
situation . . . or while the person experiences frequent rewards for appropriate behavior”
This means that for some kids with ADHD, some school subjects interest them enough to allow them to focus and concentrate such that they can get good grades. "Good" is, of course, relative. The children Brown studied had exceptionally high IQs, and therefore were considered capable of much higher achievement, but their ADHD got in the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Thomas Brown, [I
High IQ Kids With ADHD[/i]]For most of these high IQ youths with ADHD, it was
not until relatively late in their school years that their EF
impairments significantly interfered with their ability to
perform well. During early school years, many had been
placed in special classes or programs for talented and
gifted students, only to be removed eventually from
these programs as they failed to keep up with work requirements in these more demanding classes. For many,
such failures and loss of status caused escalating demoralization as they progressed through their elementary
and secondary schooling.

A number of the high IQ adolescent students in this
study were not evaluated for ADHD until their high
school years. Half of our sample were 16 or 17 years old
at the time of their first evaluation. Many of these students reported that during elementary school years they
were able to function in ways that lived up to high expectations for academic success that were held by their
parents, their teachers and themselves. As was found in
the study of Langberg, et al., [51], it was in secondary
school settings where they had to keep track of various
homework assignments for many different teachers,
without anyone to help them to prioritize and remember,
that ADHD impairments of these individuals became
apparent.
So, why should these children be considered ADHD, if they do well in school? Well, for one thing, the diagnosis of ADHD asks for two of three spheres of impairment, of which school is only one. But Brown goes further. He argues that the diagnostic criteria of impairment being relative to development should include relative not only to peer group in age, but peer group in IQ. And since the DSM does not exclude such an interpretation, there is no reason why he can't do so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Thomas Brown, [I
Attention Deficit Disorders and Comorbidities in Children, Adolescents and Adults[/i]]Consider the inattention item: “Is often forgetful in daily activities.” This might include
forgetting what has been heard or what has been seen, or both, and what has been learned or what has been done, or both. “Often” might mean many times an hour, many times a day, or many times per week. “Developmental level” might mean of the same age, of the same general range of intelligence (IQ above 70), or of the same specific range of intelligence (compared with others with IQs in the superior range).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Thomas Brown, [I
High IQ Kids With ADHD[/i]While some of these relative
impairments may be within the average range of scores
on an absolute scale, they represent significant difficulties for these very bright individuals who tend to have
great difficulty in achieving at the academic level generally expected from those with such high overall cognitive abilities. Our analysis of the percentage of individuals with these impairments may be a more useful measure for clinicians than group means because group
means tend to submerge individual variabilities
In other words, just because someone's grades are not low compared to the other children their own age does not mean that their ADHD symptoms do not have an impact of impairment on them academically.
__________________
"I know I talk too much, but I am really trying to overcome it, and although I say far too much, yet if you only knew how many things I want to say and don't, you'd give me some credit for it!"
Anne of Green Gables, by L. M. Montgomery

"I find a duck's opinion of me is very much influenced by whether or not I have bread. Ducks love bread, but they can't buy any. That's the biggest joke on the duck ever."
Mitch Hedberg

"You would be the world's worst ninja."
Pechemignonne's boyfriend
Reply With Quote
The Following 14 Users Say Thank You to pechemignonne For This Useful Post:
aeon (09-27-11), buddy (09-28-11), croweater (09-26-11), dsvlil1 (09-29-11), Fortune (09-26-11), Hadria (10-07-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), KronarTheBlack (09-26-11), LynneC (09-27-11), Marzipan (09-26-11), namazu (09-26-11), selita (09-26-11), Tetrahedra (07-31-13), whatsthebuzz (09-28-11)
  #2  
Old 09-26-11, 06:27 PM
nwbucket nwbucket is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 122
Thanks: 3
Thanked 124 Times in 61 Posts
nwbucket is just really nicenwbucket is just really nicenwbucket is just really nicenwbucket is just really nice
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

And yet with all of this evidence, I am sure you will still be given a hard time on this one by a certain member. Sorry that you feel the need to have to prove your ADD.........that is not why these forums are here if I had to guess......
Reply With Quote
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to nwbucket For This Useful Post:
buddy (09-28-11), Fortune (09-26-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), KronarTheBlack (09-26-11), Nnnnnn (09-26-11), pechemignonne (09-26-11)
  #3  
Old 09-26-11, 06:28 PM
Canuck223 Canuck223 is offline
Contributor
 

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 447
Thanks: 21
Thanked 301 Times in 154 Posts
Canuck223 is a name known to allCanuck223 is a name known to allCanuck223 is a name known to allCanuck223 is a name known to allCanuck223 is a name known to allCanuck223 is a name known to all
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

I wasn't diagnosed until well out of school. All through public school I was top of my class. In high school, I got excellent grades, although they went from high 90's down to high 80's and the odd 90.

It was University when the wheels fell off the cart. I'm a primarily inattentive, but was considered gifted. Prior to university, in most classes, I absorbed the material quickly, did the work quickly, and daydreamed the rest of the time. When I got to university, I couldn't stay focused for the longer periods required. I was paralysed when faced with the demands and couldn't prioritize. In two years, I managed to get five credits. (One year is five credits. I took four the first year as a required first year course wasn't available until second year. By Christmas in second year, I dropped all but one course.)

I can't help but think if I'd been diagnosed in public school or high school, I might be teaching instead of cleaning the toilets.
Reply With Quote
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Canuck223 For This Useful Post:
Fortune (09-26-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), LynneC (09-27-11), Marzipan (09-26-11), namazu (09-26-11), Nnnnnn (09-26-11), pechemignonne (09-26-11), Tetrahedra (07-31-13), Thandimanillon (01-19-12)
Sponsored Links
  #4  
Old 09-26-11, 06:34 PM
namazu's Avatar
namazu namazu is offline
Yeti-Wrangling Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Northern Hemisphere
Posts: 12,286
Thanks: 58,640
Thanked 18,101 Times in 8,891 Posts
namazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond reputenamazu has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

This article just showed up in the Montreal Gazette and seemed a propos.
http://www.montrealgazette.com/healt...420/story.html
It profiles a family and their attempts to manage the kids' ADHD (and help them learn to manage it).

The son, Thomas, clearly has impairing inattentive symptoms, and spends tremendous amounts of time on homework. But he is achieving on par with his peers, in part because his parents maintain a very strict schedule and provide lots of structure. Unfortunately, because of that, he was found to be ineligible for services at the public school. He transferred to a school that serves kids with ADHD and LDs, and it sounds like he's doing better there.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to namazu For This Useful Post:
Fortune (09-26-11), pechemignonne (09-26-11)
  #5  
Old 09-26-11, 07:07 PM
pechemignonne's Avatar
pechemignonne pechemignonne is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: La Belle Province
Posts: 3,045
Thanks: 4,401
Thanked 4,317 Times in 1,871 Posts
pechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond reputepechemignonne has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nwbucket View Post
And yet with all of this evidence, I am sure you will still be given a hard time on this one by a certain member. Sorry that you feel the need to have to prove your ADD.........that is not why these forums are here if I had to guess......
Well, more like I want other people to know that this "good grades = no ADHD" thing is a myth so that they can get help.

Whether or not people with their own entrenched ideas will be convinced is kind of neither here nor there to me...
__________________
"I know I talk too much, but I am really trying to overcome it, and although I say far too much, yet if you only knew how many things I want to say and don't, you'd give me some credit for it!"
Anne of Green Gables, by L. M. Montgomery

"I find a duck's opinion of me is very much influenced by whether or not I have bread. Ducks love bread, but they can't buy any. That's the biggest joke on the duck ever."
Mitch Hedberg

"You would be the world's worst ninja."
Pechemignonne's boyfriend
Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to pechemignonne For This Useful Post:
Fortune (09-26-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), Lunacie (09-26-11), stef (09-27-11), Tetrahedra (07-31-13)
  #6  
Old 09-26-11, 07:47 PM
Fortune's Avatar
Fortune Fortune is offline
I eat shades of red.
 

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: The Candy Kingdom, Land of Ooo
Posts: 12,224
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 11,773
Thanked 21,876 Times in 9,238 Posts
Fortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond reputeFortune has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

This is some good research you've done. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Fortune For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-26-11)
  #7  
Old 09-26-11, 08:19 PM
Lynx777's Avatar
Lynx777 Lynx777 is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Elkhart, IN
Posts: 176
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 168
Thanked 97 Times in 56 Posts
Lynx777 is a jewel in the roughLynx777 is a jewel in the roughLynx777 is a jewel in the rough
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

My grades in high school were dismal. I'm surprised they let me graduate! A couple of years later I joined the Air Force. During technical school I mad top marks and graduated at the top of my class.

The difference?

1. I had an overwhelming interest in the material I was studying.

2. Structure! Short segments of material, with quizzes after each segment. Then reviews of all the material prior to the section final.

3. Material presented in a "hands on" format. Example: We were learning algebra. Instead of handing us a pages of formulas and theories to memorize. This material was taught with real world scenarios. Real numbers, real problems. (I still remember all the formulas, and can adapt them to different situations)

4. I had a goal. During elementary & high School, I had more labels than I can shake a stick at. None of them were positive in the slightest. Therefore my teachers though there was no future for me, and did not talk to me about what I would do after high school. Graduation came and went, and I was left standing there wondering, "What next?"

5. Discipline. Lets face it, the military is good at discipline. Swift, and immediate. You don't do your home work.......extra guard duty. You don't pass a quiz.....how about KP duty.

Okay, I'm done now. I'm not even sure that I could reread this. Massive block of text! Sorry.
__________________
We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.
Albert Einstein
Reply With Quote
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Lynx777 For This Useful Post:
aeon (09-27-11), Fortune (09-26-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), LynneC (09-27-11), namazu (09-26-11), Nnnnnn (09-26-11), Old School MBD (09-27-11), pechemignonne (09-26-11)
  #8  
Old 09-27-11, 03:56 AM
blgw99's Avatar
blgw99 blgw99 is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Europe
Posts: 147
Thanks: 28
Thanked 97 Times in 55 Posts
blgw99 will become famous soon enough
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

I got relatively good grades in some subjects.

In my first years of school, it was straight As, but they started to drop as I was about 9 or 10, when actual structured studying was required, and I did well only in the subjects that were really interesting and was barely passing others. I also never took any extracurriculars, even ones that intersted me, because of self-esteem and peer relationship problems.

Also, at the end of high school, around here university admission tests were based on all that had been learned in the last three years. A lot of material. No study skills or excecutive function. Awful results, but I still barely managed to get in, largely as a result of pressure from the family - which is why I did not choose something I'm actually passionate about, but something I knew I could sort of manage, languages.

At university, fortunately there were a lot of practical courses. Filling in an excercise was easy for me even between lectures, but I had to re-take a number of other courses. Other mental health issues, general distress and resulting substance abuse did not help either. Only at my last year I managed to find study techniques that worked for me (bulletpointing and graphing everything!) and I don't even know how I managed to pull together a remotely presentable C-worthy thesis.

So, I got through, but instead of pursuing my real interests and building experience, all I could focus on was barely passing and I was basically unable to do anything else productive for several months after.

After that, the recession hit and I had no other choice than to go for a master's in transation studies. Again, almost all the classes dealt with hands-on assignments. But in the end, I still had to pass the theoretical/factual ones, and write my thesis. This time, it resulted in even more stress than the last time, mood issues and about six months gone to waste. On the positive side, it lead me to discover that probably ADHD had been behind many of these problems.

So, why all this trouble when I could find a low-stress job get it over with? The thing is that it's almost impossible to find one, especially with awkward people skills. And it seems even more unmanagable than school - when you fail a class at school, you usually can retake it and you are compared only to yourself, but if you fail at work or aren't THE BEST at an interview, you're screwed. Another thing is that if you manage to do great some of the time, people pressure you to keep it up all of the time, but the imparement is still there.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to blgw99 For This Useful Post:
aeon (09-27-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), pechemignonne (09-27-11)
  #9  
Old 09-27-11, 10:02 AM
Old School MBD's Avatar
Old School MBD Old School MBD is offline
Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: S.E. Washington State (in A Wheat Field)
Posts: 991
Thanks: 558
Thanked 315 Times in 229 Posts
Old School MBD has a spectacular aura aboutOld School MBD has a spectacular aura about
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

My problem with jr high high school was I would ace every test.....not do homework.....that iss what hurt my grade

Fast forward to late 30,s unmedicated I was second in my auto mechanics course

But fail as an employee due to adhd......trying meds again.....not working as mechanic.....too many closed shops....
__________________
Yo........What up?
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Old School MBD For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-27-11)
  #10  
Old 09-27-11, 10:09 AM
Lunacie's Avatar
Lunacie Lunacie is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: south-central Kansas
Posts: 17,670
Thanks: 17,638
Thanked 23,649 Times in 10,933 Posts
Lunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pechemignonne View Post
Well, more like I want other people to know that this "good grades = no ADHD" thing is a myth so that they can get help.

Whether or not people with their own entrenched ideas will be convinced is kind of neither here nor there to me...
I've been a member here for over 6 years and I've seen so many stories
about when people "hit the ADHD wall." Some clearly needed help (meds,
therapy, accomodations) before they left pre-school or kindergarten. For
many it seemed to be at around age 10 or the 5th grade. Some managed
pretty well until middle school - or high school - or college. Some made it
all the way through graduate school but "hit the wall" when they tried to
get, or keep, a job.

There just isn't a one-size-fits-all picture of what ADHD looks like.

Thank you peche!
__________________
ADD is not a problem of knowing what to do; it is a problem of doing what you know.
-RUSSELL A. BARKLEY, PH.D.


As far as I know, there is nothing positive about ADHD that people can't have w out ADHD. ~ ADD me
Reply With Quote
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Lunacie For This Useful Post:
aeon (09-27-11), Hadria (10-07-11), Jewelz81 (09-29-11), Lynx777 (09-27-11), Old School MBD (09-27-11), pechemignonne (09-27-11), Tetrahedra (07-31-13), Thandimanillon (01-19-12)
  #11  
Old 09-27-11, 11:20 AM
Etcetera's Avatar
Etcetera Etcetera is offline
ADDvanced Forum Guru
 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,011
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 277
Thanked 1,032 Times in 461 Posts
Etcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud ofEtcetera has much to be proud of
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

And this opens the room for another question.

Should children already be diagnosed and treated before problems at school become prominent or should they first hit the wall, possibly developing other mental problems because of this, before they should even be considered for treatment?

I think the way I worded my question, already reveals my opinion.

By the way - Nice research. I bow to thee.
__________________
I'm back!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Etcetera For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-27-11)
  #12  
Old 09-27-11, 02:14 PM
K-Funk's Avatar
K-Funk K-Funk is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,677
Thanks: 526
Thanked 1,658 Times in 819 Posts
K-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond reputeK-Funk has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

This was me....A's in classes that had to do with creative writing of some sort or History if they didn't make me memorize a bunch of facts and C-/D+ in subjects like math/science or language.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pechemignonne View Post
Why can some children with ADHD get As in some classes while failing at others? Because attention has a lot to do with interest. Even someone with severe ADHD inattentiveness symptoms can attend to things that they have interest in. As long as tasks related to the subject are not too sustained or difficult, the child can thus focus on the subject long enough to take in the required information on the subject.



So, why should these children be considered ADHD, if they do well in school? Well, for one thing, the diagnosis of ADHD asks for two of three spheres of impairment, of which school is only one. But Brown goes further. He argues that the diagnostic criteria of impairment being relative to development should include relative not only to peer group in age, but peer group in IQ. And since the DSM does not exclude such an interpretation, there is no reason why he can't do so.



P.S. Fantastic thread!!!
__________________
“It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.”

~ Krishnamurti

Attention wandered, I left with it.....

~Helmet



Last edited by K-Funk; 09-27-11 at 02:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to K-Funk For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-27-11)
  #13  
Old 09-27-11, 02:20 PM
RedHairedWitch's Avatar
RedHairedWitch RedHairedWitch is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wandering the wilds of Canada
Posts: 4,067
Blog Entries: 43
Thanks: 6,581
Thanked 8,477 Times in 2,827 Posts
RedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond reputeRedHairedWitch has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

Excellent thread.
__________________
The absurdity of working so hard to continue doing something you don't like can be overwhelming. And the longer it takes to feel different, the more it starts to seem like everything might actually be hopeless bull. ~ Hyperbole and a Half
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to RedHairedWitch For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-27-11)
  #14  
Old 09-27-11, 02:22 PM
Lunacie's Avatar
Lunacie Lunacie is offline
ADDvanced Forum ADDvocate
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: south-central Kansas
Posts: 17,670
Thanks: 17,638
Thanked 23,649 Times in 10,933 Posts
Lunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond reputeLunacie has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Etcetera View Post
And this opens the room for another question.

Should children already be diagnosed and treated before problems at school become prominent or should they first hit the wall, possibly developing other mental problems because of this, before they should even be considered for treatment?

I think the way I worded my question, already reveals my opinion.

By the way - Nice research. I bow to thee.
I agree, diagnosing and starting treatment before hitting the wall is best.
I really hope that in the not-too-far-off future there will be early inter-
ventions like they are starting to put in place for Autism. I know that
waiting until she hit the wall caused a lot of self-esteem problems for
my granddaughter.

Treatment can involve a lot of different things, improving diet and sleep
and parent/child interactions, having accomodations in the classroom,
play or social therapy, up to and including medications.
__________________
ADD is not a problem of knowing what to do; it is a problem of doing what you know.
-RUSSELL A. BARKLEY, PH.D.


As far as I know, there is nothing positive about ADHD that people can't have w out ADHD. ~ ADD me
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Lunacie For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-27-11)
  #15  
Old 09-27-11, 06:19 PM
Lynx777's Avatar
Lynx777 Lynx777 is offline
ADDvanced Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Elkhart, IN
Posts: 176
Blog Entries: 1
Thanks: 168
Thanked 97 Times in 56 Posts
Lynx777 is a jewel in the roughLynx777 is a jewel in the roughLynx777 is a jewel in the rough
Re: Good Grades and ADHD?

I agree that early intervention would be a huge help to the majority of kids with ADHD. But, I have to throw in the fact that ADDers do not generally learn the same way NTs do. Even if you remove ADHD from the equation, different people learn in different ways.

Our educations systems need to take this into account.

When I took algebra in high school, I just could not get it. Everything was memorize, memorize, memorize. Formula after formula, rule after rule. Once I went into tech school the format changed. Now it was, here is the formula, here is how you use it, this is why we use it.
__________________
We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.
Albert Einstein
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Lynx777 For This Useful Post:
pechemignonne (09-27-11)
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Family & relationship problems, DH newly diagnosed ADHD, son also with ADHD jacobsmom Non-ADD Partner Support 8 03-15-16 10:38 PM
Dodgy diagnosis? (long rant/post) tribalsushi Adult Diagnosis & Treatment 9 09-07-13 01:34 AM
SOOOO...I just realized my appointment is TOMORROW?!?!?!? CaptainCadet General ADD Talk 15 06-27-11 04:26 PM
High Grades / GRE 1450 & ADD / ADHD?? Mind Adult Diagnosis & Treatment 4 02-25-09 04:07 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) 2003 - 2015 ADD Forums