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Old 05-22-05, 06:58 PM
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Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

nocky,

Per your request, I have a few examples of the IEPs that we used in 4th, 5th and 6th grade. It should get you started.

Just like medication and dosage times, IEPs and Behavior Plans need to be tweaked also. Whether they need to increase/decrease resource time, or if you need to edit the IEP with additional information as far as a change in the diagnosis or medications. At any time, you can request that everyone reconvene to discuss the IEP or Behavior Plan.

As we learned from experience, it's better to "have and not need, then to need and not have" as far as what's in the IEP. As I mentioned in a previous post, the special ed teacher that started doing our IEPs in Kindergarten had just begun doing them. We were her guinea pigs. She only had "learning disabled in math and reading" for his disability because these were the areas that he would be getting the special resource classes. Our concern has always been his adhd and behavior issues and those weren't even mentioned in there. They are now!!!

Our latest IEP and Behavior Plan for 6th grade seem to be working. The school and I sent it back and forth a few times to make sure everything was included that needed to be. I am not sure if all schools have the same IEP form or not.

This year, our special school district changed to a new computer system, which I am not crazy about. The good part is that all teachers that deal with my son can have immediate access to his IEP (so maybe I do not have to make physical copies for all his teachers next year.) Only the special school district teachers can edit the IEP but all teachers can see it. The bad part of the new computer forms is that it has a lot of drop down menus and not alot of room for verbiage. It's more cut and dry. It's supposed to make it more consistent and easier for when the teachers are filling it out.

Prior to this year, his IEPs allowed for a lot of room for the special school district teacher to provide information. Whenever we had an issue at school, I'd say, "Yes, that was mentioned in his IEP." It became my standard phrase. The IEP gave them everything they ever wanted to know about my son but were afraid to ask.

Here's an example of what the IEP said when they were allowed to have a lot of room for verbiage:

He has an educational diagnosis of learning disabled in the areas of basic reading and math reasoning. He also has the diagnosis of Other Health Impaired based on a doctor's diagnosis of AD/HD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Mood Disturbance. This effects his progress in the general curriculum in ways that include the following: difficulty reading grade level material; difficulty doing grade level math; difficulty following written directions; difficulty taking tests that he must read; difficulty with impulsiveness; difficulty focusing; difficulty interpreting and reasoning about his environment, etc. He is using medication to help mediate some of the symptoms of these disorders. He needs repetition and rephrasing, refocusing on the speaker or assignment, extra time to complete work and frequent checks for comprehension.

His strengths include: positive responses to positive recognition; strong sense of self; desire to be recognized; desire to communicate with others; he enjoys drawing cars, and action activities.

Current functioning: In reading, he continues to make gains. He has decoding skills, but automaticity with more complex words is emerging. He can word call at a higher level than his comprehension. His fluency is hindered by word recognition weaknesses. Reading comprehension, although not a diagnosed area, is exceedingly difficulty for him. Even when he reads and discusses a passage, he may not remember it or its meaning the next day or hour. In math, he has become quicker at basic multiplication facts up to 5 but the 6's, 7's and 8's are much slower for him. Therefore when he is doing higher level math problems that involve the basic facts, he is slowed by his lack of memorization. Tim is allowed to use a calculator or match charts to do the basic fact calculations in multistep multiplication and division problems. He is able to take math tests in the resource room so that he can have them read to him and rephrased.

Behavioral issues have been of great concern for him. He had reached mastery the year before on the skill of not hurting others. But he started new medicine (Geodon) in the summer, and when he returned to school he was very different from the Tim we had seen in May. He was very aggressive and volatile and highly agitated when he would be corrected. So after charting his behavior and reporting it to mom, his medicine was changed to Seroquel. This did not seem to improve his behavior, although some of the paranoia evident in Geodon seemed less. He continued with the aggression and agitation when corrected. However, after charting his behavior and reporting to mom, again his medication was changed back to Respirdal, which was what he had been using successfully the year before. Since then his behavior is better in the sense that he is slightly more able to receive adult correction without behavior outbursts. He has a pattern of highs and lows in his behavior. He will have several weeks of very calm and more controlled behavior, then goes through periods of upheaval. Currently he is having a more calm period. He has some behaviors which appear to be out of his control, probably a side effect of the medications. He blinks frequently and obviously, which may be distracting to the listener who is watching him and additionally, may convey a look of disrespect or deliberate defiance when it is not meant to be. He also makes a small noise in his throat with frequent regularity. He is not trying to be noisy or disrespectful.

One of his goals has been to maintain the learned skill of not hurting others. The first half of his fifth grade saw a great setback in progress here. He had become highly aggressive toward other students on a regular basis. He hit them, kicked them, or pushed them without provocation on a daily basis. After adjusting the medication and setting new behavior plan in place, he has begun to level out some in the last weeks. He receives a great deal of positive attention during the day to try to encourage and reward positive behaviors. He is learning and participating in class in spurts.

The goals for 4th grade going into 5th grade were:
1) He will read 2nd-3rd grade level material with 70% accuracy by 1-30-04. Benchmarks were: He will decode multi-syllabic words, will recognize sight words at this level, will recognize content vocabulary words at this level.
2) He will solve math reasoning problems at 3rd-4th grade level with 60% accuracy by 1-30-04. Benchmarks were: He will solve on step math problems, and he will solve multi-step math problems.
3) He will maintain the learned skill of not hurting others with no more than one infraction per week until 1-30-04. Benchmarks were: He will not hurt other's bodies; he will not hurt other's feelings; he will not hurt other's belongings.

The goals for 5th grade going into 6th grade were:
1) He will read content area material with 70% accuracy by 1/12/05. Benchmarks were: He will identify selected vocabulary words in isolation; will identify selected vocabulary words in content; will read the entire selection with embedded vocabulary words.
2) He will solve math reasoning problems with 70% accuracy by 1-12-05. Benchmarks were: He will solve math reasoning problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; will solve one step math problems; will solve multi-step math problems.
3) He will maintain the skill of not hurting others with no more than one infraction per week until 1-12-05. Benchmarks were: He will not hurt other's bodies; he will not hurt other's feelings; he will not hurt other's belongings.

Under accommodations for 4th and 5th grade, under administration accommodations, it showed oral reading of assessment for state and district assessments. Under timing accommodations, it showed extended time allotted to complete Terra Nova tests; administer test using more than three test periods. Under response accommodations, it showed use of arithmetic tables and calculator. Under setting accommodations, it showed testing with small groups. Under grading, it showed modify weight of course examinations; modify weight of course components; use of weekly grade checks. Under lectures, it showed preferential seating. Under tests/exams, it showed extended time for completion; and read test to student. Under environment, it showed preferential seating. Under assignments, it showed: lower difficulty level-shorten assignments; directions given in a variety of ways; give oral cues/prompts; adapt worksheets and packets; avoid penalizing for penmanship; avoid penalizing for spelling errors; maintain assignment notebook; assistance in recording assignments. Under reinforcement, it showed: use positive/concrete reinforcers; repeated review and drill; frequent reminders of rules; check often for understanding/review; frequent eye contact/proximity control. Under pacing, it showed: extended time for oral responses; extended time for written responses.

He got 300 minutes weekly for reading resource. 150 minutes weekly for math resource and 150 minutes weekly for social skills.

***********************************
Since they no longer can write so much on the new computerized form (they just point and click), I made sure that everything from the previous IEPs carried over and was somewhere in the current IEP.

The goals for 6th grade were:
Specific area of need include: reading comprehension, math calculation and reasoning, organization, focus

Disability affects performance in: ability understanding new math concepts, comprehending 6th grade curriculum when reading, staying organized and coming to class prepared to work (pencils, paper, books), focusing during class.

He appears to learn best through: small groups, giving him plenty of time to understand, giving him extra time to complete work, listening to what he has to say, giving him time outs when he is having a bad day.

In order to access the curriculum, he will: remain in control so that he can remain in the classroom, advocate for himself when he knows he is having a bad day, bring all needed supplies to class, stay focused, complete classwork and homework.

As identified by school staff, he demonstrate strengths in: reading, basic skills, using a tracking sheet, knowing when he is having a bad day, relationships with some of his teachers, wanting to do well in school.

Since his last IEP, his functioning has changed in the following ways: he reads beautifully, comprehension has improved, basic math is improving, working at staying focused, completing most of his assignments.

His goals are:
1) He will complete assignments in a timely manner with 80% accuracy. Benchmark: He will utilize teachers and study skills class to complete assignments and get a better understanding of the material. He will bring appropriate supplies to class so that all work can be completed. He will raise his hand or approach the teacher to ask for help when he does not have a clear understanding. When he is having trouble staying on task, he can take a time out in the hall or use the appropriate suggestions in his behavior plan.

2) He will be able to answer inference questions, make predictions, outline, and summarize with 80% accuracy. Benchmark: He will be able to use an outline, web or graphic organizer to get a better understanding of a reading passage. He will be able to make predictions, assumptions by organizing his information to get a better understanding.

3) He will be able to reason out math problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with 80% accuracy. Benchmark: He will be able to complete math fractions, decimal, and percentage problems using basic skills. He will be able to complete basic geometry problems. He will be able to use basic skills to solve word problems.

He gets 225 minutes weekly for reading resources. 225 minutes weekly for math resources. 225 minutes weekly for task completion class. 30 minutes weekly for consultation.

For Timing Accommodations, he gets the Terra Nova tests administered using more than three testing periods for all classes. For Response Accommodations, he gets to use a calculator. For Setting Accommodations, he gets testing with small groups.

Modifications shows as: for lectures, he gets preferential seating. For tests/exams, he gets extended time for completion, open book exams and alternative seating. For environment, he gets preferential seating. For assignments, he gets directions given in a variety of ways, extended time for completion, he maintains and assignment notebook, and gets assistance in recording assignments. For reinforcement, they use positive/concrete reinforcers, frequent reminders of rules, check often for understanding/review. For pacing, he is allowed frequent breaks/vary activities.

**********************

He also has a Behavior Plan that is in place. It not only helps him, but it also helps the teachers in how they react to his behaviors. They are "supposed to" go through the required steps prior to just sending him to the office.

Here's an example of one of his Behavior Plans:

Target Behaviors:
Classroom disruptions and handling confrontation. This might include talking to other students, throwing items at students, making noises, being disrespectful to teachers, putting down other students, becoming belligerent when confronted with responsibility of own actions, walking around the classroom, refusing to complete work, and finding himself behind and off task.

Data collected: Direct observation, teacher discussion and information, previous IEP and behavior plan, tracking sheets, detention forms, and referral forms.

Hypothesis statement:
Tim may become disruptive in class by making noises, tapping his pencil, talking to other students. At times he may overreact to students, or teacher demands. This may be a problem. These problems may surface during class lessons, independent work, at frustration level, hallway times, and unstructured times. These triggers are usually used to escape work or gain attention, or used to leave the classroom (function). He can often at these times be redirected to work, be brought back on task, but more than often he will need to leave the classroom for a time out or to cool down in the hall or the resource room.

Desired Behavior:
Tim needs to have a few minutes to get himself back together when in the hall or the resource room. He can then return to class when his behavior and attitude have changed. He will need to enter the room, be seated, and begin his work. He will have to raise his hand to ask questions, or when he needs help. He will have to do his work or any group work quietly without hindering others.

Setting Event Manipulation:
  • Tim should have preferential seating in all his classrooms in order to minimize distractions and problems that might occur.
  • Tim will be able to work in another area of each classroom if possible without distractions when needed. If possible, he will remain in his classroom. If this is not possible, his time will be spent in the resource room. This can be determined by Tim or the teacher. Tim can return to his classroom when things have settled down, he is back on track, and is ready to complete his work.
  • Tim receives Special School District services for a current IEP. He attends resource classes for Language Arts, Mathematics, and Task Completion. Those classes have already modified and adapted the curriculum for the students. Academic modifications will continue to be made in the general education classrooms. A copy of Tim's IEP has been given to both general education teachers which includes all modifications and adaptations to be made for Tim to be successful.
  • After observation at the beginning of school, Tim might need to be assigned a place at the lunchroom table that minimizes interactions with certain other students.
Antecedent Manipulations:
  • Teachers will use precorrects and prompts before difficult situations and assignments.
  • Teachers will remind Tim of expectations during the day. This could be a gentle reminder from the teacher, a hand on his shoulder, a simple sign, or a few short words of correction.
  • Tim will carry a visual schedule of his day's routine. These will change periodically because of Encore classes. His routines will need to be taught and reinforced.
Behavior Teaching:
  • Tim will use a daily tracking sheet and carry it from class to class to record assignments, gather behavior information, and organize Tim's day for himself.
  • Teacher cues will be used to help Tim keep himself on track, out of trouble, and completing his tasks.
  • In most situations it would be helpful if Tim were given choices. He needs to be responsible for his own actions and his own choices whether good or bad. These can all be learning situations for Tim, other students, and the teachers.
  • Appropriate, constant and direct consequences should be given for Tim's choices. Good choices should be rewarded and bad choices should have an immediate consequence.
  • Routines for organizing his assignments should be taught and reinforced in Study Skill/Task Completion at the end of each day.
Consequences:
  • Classroom teachers will positively praise Tim when he is on task and behaving appropriately.
  • Verbal and non-verbal cues will first be given when Tim is off task or having a difficult time.
  • When verbal or non-verbal cues do not work, Tim will be given time in the classroom to redirect himself.
  • When Tim cannot redirect himself, he can be sent to the resource room to have a chance to get things under control.
  • When Tim cannot get things under control in the resource room, he can step out into the hall, take five, and bring himself back in the classroom, or the previous teacher's classroom.
  • When Tim cannot get control of the situation, he will be sent to the office.
  • Once sent to the office, he will be given a lunch detention for bad choices and inappropriate behavior. This lunch detention can be served in the cafeteria or the resource room.
  • If things are still out of hand in the office, Tim may be given an after school detention. The office will determine this.
  • At any time during this process, Tim's mother may be called for advice or to be given information about a situation.
Reinforces:
  • Positive praise
  • Tangibles
  • Free time
  • A review of consequences
  • Daily tracking sheet
Responsibilities of Classroom Teachers:
  • Assist with implementation of this behavior plan
  • Provide feedback when needed
  • Record any problems
  • Provide and use daily tracking sheet
  • Follow sequence of events when Tim makes a bad decision or behaves inappropriately
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Old 05-22-05, 07:10 PM
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Wow!!!!!!!! Thank you for sharing that
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Old 05-23-05, 01:24 AM
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Have you checked out this link, too: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16461

Lots of good info.
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Old 05-23-05, 06:35 PM
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Thanks so much for sharing this! Your posting/info came at the perfect time ... I've been looking for some additional suggestions for my son's IEP ... we have his IEP meeting scheduled for tomorrow.
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Old 09-03-05, 11:19 AM
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On August 15 my 12 year old adhd/ocd/mood disorder son started 7th grade.

Prior to his first day, we met his teachers at a Back to School Night, with the exception of his special education teacher. She had to leave for the night by the time we went by her classroom.

His schedule was working well for the first week and we were on a roll. All the hard work we had done on getting his IEP and Behavior Plan in place at the end of 6th grade seemed to have paid off.

I sent an email to all his teachers letting them know a little about my son, his issues, about his IEP and his Behavior Plan so that we were all on the same page. I received favorable emails in response.

In week 2, they suddenly changed his Resource Studies Skills Class to Social Studies. Hmmm? I know that during his IEP meeting at the end of last year, I was adament that he was to keep his Studies Skills class because that was the last class of the day and his special ed teacher would be there if he had any homework issues etc...This didn't seem right but I let it go for a few days.

His homework assignment book started coming home daily with either no homework written down or the assignment would be there but I couldn't read his writing, or the books that were needed weren't brought home. His IEP clearly states that his teachers are to check his assignment book daily to make sure everything is there and in his bookbag. (Another Red Flag)

Then he said he got a whole punch because he threw paper at someone and then another whole punch for talking in class. Three whole punches get a detention. His behavior plan clearly states that he will be redirected prior to any discipline. (Another Red Flag)

When he took his State Math Test, they wouldn't let him use his calculator. This is in his IEP also. Hey wait a minute. Stop the press.

All these things are in his IEP plus his Behavior Plan. In my introduction email, I asked if everyone had a copy of his paperwork.

I then sent a lengthy email to his resource teacher in regard to taking away one of his special education classes plus the calculator, etc.. and also left her a voice mail. She called and said that she had a copy of his IEP in front of her and that those things were not mentioned in it.

I advised her that I had a copy of the final IEP "that I signed" and would send her a copy. Plus I had my old emails from last school year that I sent to his 6th grade resource teacher telling her what needed to be changed in the IEP prior to my signing it. Plus an email thanking her for making the changes.

I forwarded the emails to his new resource teacher plus I copied his 6th grade resource teacher. Plus I sent in the copy of the IEP that I had.

I also mentioned that last year I was told they went to a new computer system and that all they had to do was make changes to the IEP in the computer and save it and that any teacher that my son had could access the IEP electronically.

Since I work in the Systems Department and am very familiar with computer programs, I said that "perhaps", just "maybe", the changes that were made did not save correctly. Guess what? They weren't.

She located a paper copy that matched the copy I had that showed he was supposed to get 225 minutes weekly for reading resources. 225 minutes weekly for math resources. 225 minutes weekly for task completion class (aka Study Skills Class) plus 30 minutes weekly for consultation (in case he needs to go to one of his regular teachers for help on something.)

We just finished week 3 of school and on Thursday he got back to the schedule he should be on. Plus he gets to take his State Math Test over so that he can use a calculator.

Sheessshh. What if I wouldn't have said anything? How many other IEPs aren't accurate in the computer and aren't being applied correctly.

The morale of the story is: Don't assume anything. Follow-up. Ask questions. And if something isn't working for you, reconvene for another IEP meeting and change it.

Oh well, only 6 more years until he graduates.
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Old 09-03-05, 08:45 PM
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Deep breaths, adhdxyz, deep breaths.

Your son is extremely fortunate to have such a well informed advocate (extra perk that you're his mom, too)! I have great relationships with the classroom teachers my older two kids work with daily. We also use a computer system, but not with the problems you experienced. This biggest issue we've had is when the systems are down, and things cannot be added, unless by hand. They prefer not to add on hand written things, because mistakes can be made when transferring it to the computer format later.

This occurred w. my daughter's iep last year. I trust her teachers, but I still read every single word in their ieps, because mistakes happen. I caught one that was a big deal, and had been a focal point of her transition to middle school. I called her special ed. teacher directly (interdistrict phone system is quite convenient), and she double checked her copy. It was changed before the end of the day, and the corrected copy was accompanied by a written apology for the oversight. It was sent in a yellow envelope via my daughter's backpack, as agreed upon.

I am with you regarding the check constantly, ask questions, reconvene whenever necessary. It's the only way to make sure things are working. I wish your son the very best possible sixth grade experience.

Cynde
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Old 01-29-11, 10:17 AM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

Found this very interesting. Be interested to see some examples of the IEP you are using
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Old 01-30-11, 09:49 AM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

I know this is a old post, but I would very interesting to know how things are going? Be interested to see your son's IEP and Behavioural plan if that would be possible. At least you seem to get things moving. Find it very strange that teachers don't read them carefully, but believe me it happens all over the world.

Halvo
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Old 03-25-11, 11:19 AM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

Hi everyone. I haven't been on the forum for a while so wanted to let you all know that I am still alive. I was logging in to check this post so that I could show a co-worker. She was talking to me yesterday about her adhd middle school nephew and I was telling her the importance of having an IEP.

Believe it or not, my son just turned 18 years old this month and is a Senior in high school. He gets off school 2 classes early each day because he has more credits than he needs to graduate. For 1st Semester he got 3 A's and 2 B's PLUS Perfect Attendance AND he's graduating in 2 months. (I mean...WE are graduating in 2 months)

Sorry. I just fainted when I typed that....It's still amazing to me.

As far as his IEP, I actually just went to his final IEP meeting last week. Even though he's in 12th grade, the IEP is still evaluated and updated for his success. If he does not utilize the resources listed in the IEP (such as being able to take tests in the library or having extended test time) it's available if he needs it.

I used to dread going to IEP meetings and Parent-Teacher Conferences but since about 8th grade, I have looked forward to them. All his teachers adore him and have nothing but wonderful things to say about him. It's a 360 degree difference than how the meetings used to be when he was in grade school. I stopped bringing my husband to the meetings back then because he'd get so upset when he heard them saying how horrible our sons behavior was, etc.. Now my husband also enjoys going. It's amazing. We walk out of there gleaming and smiling ear to ear while congratulating our son for how great he did. We look like a normal functioning non-adhd family

His counselor advised that he should make an appt for the Access Office at the college he is going to attend in Fall (for Graphic Design) to see what accommodations are available. She also advised that due to his IEP, he should be able to take the college math placement test using a calculator. He's super good in math and algebra (not sure where he inherited that from) so he may not need to use a calculator but it's a resource for him if he decides to utilize it

I am really glad I logged back into the forum because I enjoy typing "happy things" that can hopefully shed a slight glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel for all of the parents that are currently going through what we actually survived. Hang in there. I'm planning on logging back in frequently to offer my words of wisdom and support.
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Old 03-31-11, 02:10 PM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

Dear adhdxyz,
I am going to my 6th grade son's IEP meeting tomorrow and have read and re-read your suggestions and I can't tell you how much I appreciate your posting not only your verbiage in the IEP plan but also how encouraging it is to read your follow-up from this past month regarding how well your son "turned out". I am going through a tough year with my son, he has one teacher who has a serious problem with his behavior and writes me notes literally 3 or 4 times a week. I am hoping the IEP meeting tomorrow will pave the way for the rest of the school year as well as a good start to the new one in 7th grade.
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Old 03-31-11, 02:44 PM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

befrazzled,

I am glad that after all my many years of pain and tears, I am now able to lend a little guidance and encouragement to others that are following in our adhdxyz footsteps. Hang in there.

My son just walked in with a bright yellow piece of paper that he got at school that says "You are invited to have lunch with Dr. Robinson Tuesday April 5 2011 11:10am-11:35am balcony of cafe. Congratulations on your 5.0 G.P.A. last Semester."

All I can say is that this bright yellow paper is ALOT better than the years that he brought home detention/suspension papers. This is for him to have a congratulations lunch with the principal. And what the heck is a 5.0? I thought 4.0 was the highest.

I am taking a picture of this invitation so I can put it in his memory book.

"It Takes A Village to get an ADHD kid through school."
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Old 08-01-12, 02:11 PM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

Elementary School was a breeze for DD who has ADHD. She thrived with the type of teachers you find in Elementary school. Middle school is where the troubles began. Along with switching classes, having to organize binders/books/assignments for each class, the teachers are no longer involving the children in the education. They are to sit down, do their work, and shut up!

DD was failing every class, no assignments had been turned in yet she did homework until midnight EVERY night. This is when we started the fight for a modified IEP. The councelors helped go through my DDs locker and found EVERY assignment crumpled but completed! Middle school was challenging but our IEP "team" meetings were very much a "team". They were meetings in which each teacher discussed what worked in their class to help DD succeed. Some teachers complained but other teachers would offer advise. I even learned that my daughter could play the piano from one of these meetings. It is her hyperfocus and her release of emotion.

Then came High School. Again, they are to sit down, do their work, and shut up! Except now the teachers think that the ADDer/ADHDer should be "mature" enough to function without help, even though the child has an IEP. The "team" meetings now consist of the Couselor and maybe 1 teacher who all look at me and tell me that I need to hold my daughter responsible, she needs to be accountable. Don't you think I want my daughter to be able to do the things "normal" kids are able to do????

Because of her modifications such as leaving her text books in class, being able to play the piano when she feels overwhelmed, using a resource room for tests, completing homework assignments in class... She has been very successful with her grades. So of course, they want to take her off of the IEP because she is now an A-B student. Why do you guys not get it. Education is your profession, you should understand that it is because of these modifications that she is doing so well!!! Ughhhh

So now she is going to be a Senior! The teachers of course keep telling me that she is not going to get the same treatment in college and needs to get used to doing things without help because in college she isn't going to get any. Ummm, she still has a modified IEP, she is still in high school, you are required to follow this IEP and hello, she is not in college and you are not a professor so just do your freakin job!!! ughhhhhhh again. Sorry didn't mean to rant on your thread. Just thought I would offer an experienced objective from a mother who has been around the block with a modified IEP. If anyone has any questions regarding applying for an IEP or modifications we have used that actually worked, please feel free to PM me.
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Old 11-22-12, 11:04 PM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

Today is Thanksgiving and I am thankful for my adhd son doing so well in school. He is now 19 years old and is in his 2nd year of college. WOW. "Time flies when you're having fun" (said no one ever that was the parent of an adhd kid when trying to get them through school).

Since I am so thankful and actually finally remembered to do this, I am posting an example of his college IEP. (Yes, believe it or not, there is an IEP in college if needed.)

When he was in his final year of high school, his counselor took him and several other students in special ed to the community college that he is going to and showed them where the Access Office was, what forms they needed to have filled out by his doctor showing his diagnosis, etc... Then once the forms were submitted, a panel at the college approves or denies the request for special accommodations.

As soon as classes start for college, "he makes an appt" to go to the Access Office. This could be a challenge for an adhd student because they are used to their grade/middle/high school teachers/counselors making the appts to meet with the student and the parents to go over the IEP. Now that they are in college, "they" (the student) have to remember to make their own appt with the Access Office, "they" have to remember to show up at the appt, "they" have to be their own advocate. They have to do this each semester.

Again, this is how it works at my son's college...
Once they go to the Access Office, the ball gets rolling. The Access Office creates an "Instructor Notification Memo" for each of his class teachers. He then has to go back to the Access Office to pick up the papers. He then has to manually give each of his teachers one of the papers. Again, if he doesn't do this all himself, he won't receive special accommodations. After all the years of blood, sweat and tears trying to survive all the red tape in the special ed process, we are going to use every accommodation that is possible if he needs it. Here's how his college IEP looks:

***********
To: Teacher XXX
From: Access Office Staff
Class: XXX

XXXX is enrolled in your class, has a documented disability, and is registered with our office.
The accommodations listed below have been discussed with the student and are based on documentation of the disability kept on file in our office. These accommodations have been determined to be reasonable per the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disability Act, and national guidelines from the Association on Higher Education and Disability.
Because the student may function differently in each class, every accommodation may not be needed. It is important to you and the student discuss the accommodations for your particular class. If, after talking to the student, you need further clarification, please contact our office.

TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS:
**Extended time. Extended time is defined as double time. Exceptions to double time are based on documentation and are made on a case-by-case basis. Please discuss exceptions with the Access Office.
**Quiet, distraction-reduced environment with minimal interruptions.
**Six function calculator or a fact sheet. More information regarding the calculator/fact sheet policy can be found in the Access Office Faculty Handbook.

ENVIRONMENTAL ADJUSTMENTS:

Preferential seating in front of class allows the student access to the instruction.

EQUIPMENT NEEDS:

Needs to tape lectures as a form of notetaking.

After accommodations have been provided, the student should be graded according to the same standards as other XXX College students.

As a art of the College's compliance with the disability laws, it is suggested that you make an announcement expressing your willingness to talk about special needs at the beginning of the semester. Additionally, we recommend that you include an ADA statement in your syllabus. These two actions might encourage the student to discuss accommodations and show evidence that you understand your role in providing accommodations. An examples of an ADA statement is available online at xxxx

If you are receiving this form, the student has signed a Release of Information Form allowing instructors and ACCESS OFFICE staff to communicate regarding accommodations and academic progress.

THIS INFORMATION IS CONFIDENTIAL AND SHOULD NOT BE SHARED WITH ANY PERSON OTHER THAN THE STUDENT. In order to prevent breach of confidentiality, please dispose of this notification after the student has completed this course.
We realize the importance of faculty understanding and support in provided accommodations to students. The ACCESS OFFICE staff is committed to working with you in maintaining the integrity of the educational experience and in creating equal access opportunities.
THANK YOU

************************
So, as you can see by the above example, if a college student has been approved for special accommodations, they are entitled to it.

His major is Graphic Design. In his 1st year of college, he didnt take any art classes. He took all the basic classes like reading, math, etc.. He used the IEP accommodations when taking tests. He was able to take tests in a quiet area set up by the Access Office. He just had to remember to schedule the test time each time he would need to go there to take a test to make sure they had space available. This has to be done for each class for each test. He also was able to use the IEP accommodation of using a calculator.
This year he is taking mostly art classes so he hasnt had to use any of the accommodations except for his math class.

I am happy to report that he likes going to school and got Deans list last year.

I am the light at the end of the IEP tunnel. Stay focused, keep your eyes on the road, and full speed ahead...
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Old 12-02-12, 05:53 PM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

WOW~does my post actually have 62,082 views? If so, then all the years of blood, sweat and mostly tears have been well worth it!!!
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Old 03-10-13, 02:51 PM
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Re: Examples of IEP and Behavior Plan

Wow, it's so great that you have come back and did updates. Its nice to know how things have turned out for your son. I found his IEP very interesting, and it's a great resource to me as a mom with a son starting kindergarten this year.

Does anyone from Canada know whether there are IEP's here? And what they are called?
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