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Old 09-09-05, 10:04 PM
foldyclothes foldyclothes is offline
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Fish Oil

I was reading in a magazine that a diet high in protein, low in carbs, and 2000mg of fish oil daily works wonders for ADD. Can anyone confirm this?
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Old 09-10-05, 12:39 AM
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I don't reduce carbs any more, but I get a big hit of fish oil daily.

I have taken a softer approach to caring for myself since getting onto dex. Of course it might also have something to do with being in my forties too, but maybe we can get into that later. I fine grind two table spoons of flax seed every morning, take a table spoon of cod liver oil too.

I don't know if it helps, but I changed so many things for the better, that it would be hard to pin point any single element as being more important than any other.

I began being much more physical at the same time as my diet changed. I had started to reduce carbs and lost 10 pounds before I even noticed I'd dropped the weight. Once I started to run, I needed the carbs, but when I'm not active I can gas them in favour of other foods and feel a whole lot more energetic for the change.

I have a fast metabolism and tend to be a carb junkie so the running really helped give some of that fuel something to do. All these things have combined to create a much happier and healthier Ian. I think supplements are OK for me, but the big ticket item for me was the introduction of some easy aerobic activity for 40 minutes four times a week. By aerobic I mean that I began working at 70% of my maximum heart rate. Get back to me if you want details on this or do a google search. There is an active thread in the exercise forum here anyone would be welcome to join.

That in itself created the biggest changes I've seen in any of the ways I've tried to influence my ADHD positively. It just covers so many of the bases I wanted covered. I'm a much more content being because of it.

I've just come back from some time off doing other physically demanding things and only managed 12 miles this week I think, but in July I ran nearly 90 miles.

The key was to ease into it very very slowly and establish the habit before burning out or getting injured. I took 14 weeks to go from walking a half hour to running a half hour. I had run 23 years ago and knew full well how badly hurt I can get by not paying attention to patience! I started running after several months of deliberately more dedicated active time in October 2004, last year.

So although I'm no star athlete or anything, I now find myself looking pretty buff if I do say so myself. My wife says so too actually and that can't be a bad thing right? heheh I feel great physically and my emotions are quite a bit more resilient if I'm this active.

Dextroamphetamine plays a strong role in my life, but I'm not sitting around waiting for a magic answer in a pill. I'm covering as broad a base as I can. Meditation is another strong positive influence for me, but right now, I am not consistent with it. One step at a time, many of us build up a repertoire of tools that improve our lives and the lives of those that live with us.
Keep us posted with what you find please.
Cheers! Ian.
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Old 09-10-05, 12:48 AM
foldyclothes foldyclothes is offline
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how much fish oil do you take? how does it help exactly?
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Old 09-10-05, 01:06 AM
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The benefits are many. I take a big table spoon full and wash it down with my ground flax that's swirled into a big glass of water. My wife thinks I'm nuts, and she's right of course.
Cheers! Ian.
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Old 09-17-05, 12:46 AM
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Hey Foldy

I hope you get this. You should research Dyspraxia. It is recomended that you take roughly 1,000 mg three times a day. This works for me. Also, eating salmon has the highest potency- I can feel it. You can buy the fish oil at Costco real cheap and it is Norweigen. It is recomended that you also take flax seed oil.
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Old 09-20-05, 05:25 PM
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In the ADD book Delivered from Distraction, they recommend high protein, and omega-3s (fish oil & flaxseed oil)

But it doesn't say exactly how fish oil helps with ADD symptoms. Only that studies are underway, and it's expected that they will show results.

So I've been taking 2400mg of fish oil per day for several weeks. I've been adding foods that have flaxseed oil in them, but I'm not currently taking a flax suppliment.

Does it work? I don't know for sure. I can say that I have been more productive. Of course my doctor has also made changes in my medications, so it's hard to know which it is. But, there have been days where I haven't taken meds and have still seen an improvement, so maybe it is working.

Anyway, they say it takes a few weeks to see the maximum benefit from fish oil, so you may not see much difference at first.

But if anyone can tell me what exactly omega-3s would do for ADD, I'd appreciate it. Also I've seen conflicting information about Flax- whether it's helpful or not.
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Old 09-20-05, 06:45 PM
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Omega 3 long chain fatty acids have shown some promise as a "supplement" only ( at least at this point in time) for ADHD.

"Works wonders" would be inaccurate. The potential seems to be there.More research needs to be done however, before anyone can say that it "works wonders".

I take pharmaceutical grade Omega 3's. If I had to look at it from the standpoint of trying to use it as an actual clinical treatment, then it wouldn't have worked.

I don't know if it helps as a supplement, but it doesn't hurt so, what the heck.
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Old 09-20-05, 09:39 PM
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I, too, can speak to the benefits of fish oil, but only to my skin. I had several patches of dry skin that have completely cleared up since I began taking fish and flax oils. My nails are also in somewhat better condition. Other than that, I haven't noticed any immediate benefit. That doesn't bother me, though, because I started taking it for the cardiovascular benefits rather than anything I thought might help with ADD.
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Old 09-28-05, 11:59 PM
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Question I take Omega 3 Fish Oil capsules...But what dose should i take?

I've been taking Omega 3 fish oil capsules daily, for the last week...

I used to take them irregulary, some time ago, but this time, i'm trying to take them regulary, to see if the supplement helps my ADHD in any way.

I'm not too sure, what dosage i should take though, so, if anyone here, can help me out, i would appreciate it.. Cheers!
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Old 09-29-05, 12:33 AM
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Sorry for the huge post, I had to cut and paste. It from Consumer Labs, it is a subscription thing so a link won't get you in.

Natural Products Encyclopedia

Conditions:

Attention Deficit Disorder

Related Terms
AADD; ADD; ADHD; Adult Attention Deficit Disorder; Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder; Hyperkinetic Syndrome
Principal Proposed Natural Treatments
DMAE; Zinc
Other Proposed Natural Treatments
Blue-Green Algae; Calcium; Combined Amino Acids (GABA); Combined Polysaccharides (Galactose); Food Allergen Avoidance and Other Dietary Changes ; Fucose; Glucose; Glycine; Inositol; Iron; L-Glutamine; L-Phenylalanine; L-Tyrosine; Magnesium; Mannose; Massage; N-acetylgalactosamine; N-acetylglucosamine; N-acetylneuraminic Acid; St. John's Wort; Taurine; Trace Minerals; Xylose
Probably Not Effective Treatments

Essential Fatty Acids (Fish Oil); Evening Primrose Oil

Originally, the term attention deficit disorder (ADD) referred to children who were incapable of concentrating at school. "Hyperkinesia" was used somewhat synonymously, as a descriptive term for children who simply couldn't sit still. Today, the definition has broadened to include many adults, and has been refined into two conditions: ADD and ADHD (attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder). Characteristics include difficulty sustaining attention or completing tasks, easy distractibility, impulsive behavior, and, in the case of ADHD, an excessive inclination to fidget and move about. These problems make it difficult to succeed at work or at school.

Conventional treatment focuses on stimulants such as caffeine, Dexedrine, and Ritalin. These drugs produce a paradoxically calming effect in people with ADD, for reasons we don't understand. Certain antidepressants may also be useful.






DMAE

There is some evidence that the supplement DMAE (2-Dimethylaminoethanol) may be helpful for ADD, according to studies performed in the 1970s. Two such studies were reported in a review article. 1 Fifty children aged 6 to 12 years who had been diagnosed with hyperkinesia participated in a double-blind study comparing DMAE to placebo. The dose was increased from 300 mg daily to 500 mg daily by the third week, and continued for 10 weeks. Evaluations revealed statistically significant test score improvements in the treatment group compared to the placebo group.

Another double-blind study compared DMAE with both Ritalin and placebo in 74 children with "learning disabilities" (it appears that today, the participants would have been given a diagnosis of ADD). 1 It found significant test score improvement for both treatment groups over a 10-week period.

For more information, including dosage and safety issues, see the full DMAE article.

Zinc

The mineral zinc has shown some promise for treatment of ADHD. In a large double-blind, placebo-controlled study (approximately 400 participants), use of zinc at a dose of 40 mg daily produced statistically significant benefits as compared to placebo. 26 This dose of zinc is higher than nutritional needs, but not so high as to be unsafe. However, the benefits seen were quite modest: about 28% of the participants given zinc showed improvement, but so did 20% in the placebo group.

Another, much smaller study evaluated whether zinc at 15mg per day could enhance the effect of Ritalin. 27 Again, modest benefits were seen. Finally, exceedingly weak evidence hints that zinc might enhance the effectiveness of evening primrose oil for ADHD (see next section). 28

For more information, including dosage and safety issues, see the full Zinc article.

Essential Fatty Acids

Essential fatty acids (EFAs) are "good fats," substances as important to your general health as vitamins. Based on evidence that essential fatty acids are necessary for the proper development of brain function in growing children, EFAs found in fish oil and evening primrose oil have been tried for the treatment of ADHD and related conditions. However, the results have been less than impressive.

In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 50 children with ADHD, use of essential fatty acids from fish oil and evening primrose oil failed to provide any consistent, significant benefit above and beyond the placebo effect. 29(The placebo effect, however, was considerable.) In a slightly smaller double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, weak evidence of benefit was seen, but the the results are difficult to interpret due to the high number of people who dropped out of the study. 3

In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of children already using stimulant therapy, the addition of the essential fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, found in fish oil) for four months failed to further improve symptoms. 20

Evening primrose oil alone failed to prove effective for attention deficit disorder in a small double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 21 In a placebo-controlled, comparative trial, evening primrose oil proved less effective than standard medical treatment. 22 However, a close look at the data in this last trial hinted that evening primrose oil might have been more effective in people with adequate zinc levels. 28 This suggests that combination therapy with zinc and evening primrose oil should be tried, but thus far this approach has not been tested.

Other Natural Treatments

A small, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial evaluated the possible efficacy of the supplement carnitine for ADD in boys 13 and younger. 23 Approximately 50% of the participants responded to carnitine, a significantly higher percentage than responded to placebo. These promising results suggest that a larger trial is warranted.

Vitamin B 3 (niacin), vitamin B 6, and multivitamin/multimineral supplements have been recommended for the treatment of ADD. However, a review of the literature found no meaningful evidence to indicate that any of these treatments are effective. 4

One study is sometimes said to have proven magnesium helpful for ADD, 24 but in fact the study design was inadequate to prove much of anything.

Other supplements that are sometimes recommended for ADD include calcium, iron, inositol, trace minerals, blue-green algae, combinations of amino acids (usually GABA, glycine, taurine, L-glutamine, L-phenylalanine, and L-tyrosine), and combinations of the polysaccharides (galactose, glucose, mannose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, fucose, N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, and xylose). St. John's wort has also become popular recently. However, there no reliable evidence for any of these treatments at this time. Note: St. John's Wort interacts with many medications, and could, conceivably, impair the effectiveness of Ritalin.

One study hints that massage might be helpful for ADD. 25

It is commonly said that eliminating sugar, food additives, and food allergens improves ADD symptoms. However, the body of published evidence regarding these therapies remains, at best, incomplete and contradictory. 5,19


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

References

1. Re' O. 2-Dimethylaminoethanol (deanol): a brief review of its clinical efficacy and postulated mechanism of action. Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. 1974;16:1238,1242.

2. Knobel M. Approach to a combined pharmacologic therapy of childhood hyperkinesis. Behav Neuropsychiatry. 1974,1975;6:87,90.

3. Richardson AJ, Puri BK. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effects of supplementation with highly unsaturated fatty acids on ADHD-related symptoms in children with specific learning difficulties. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2002;26:233,239.

4. Kleijnen J, Knipschild P. Niacin and vitamin B 6 in mental functioning: a review of controlled trials in humans. Biol Psychiatry. 1991;29:931,941.

5. Carter CM, Urbanowicz M, Hemsley R, et al. Effects of a few food diet in attention deficit disorder. Arch Dis Child. 1993;69:564,568.

6. Egger J, Carter CM, Graham PJ, et al. Controlled trial of oligoantigenic treatment in the hyperkinetic syndrome. Lancet. 1985;1:540,545.

7. Egger J, Stolla A, McEwen LM. Controlled trial of hyposensitisation in children with food-induced hyperkinetic syndrome. Lancet. 1992;339:1150,1153.

8. Rapp DJ. Does diet affect hyperactivity? J Learn Disabil. 1978;11:383,389.

9. Rapp DJ. Food allergy treatment for hyperkinesis. J Learn Disabil. 1979;12:608,616.

10. Rippere V. Food additives and hyperactive children: a critique of Conners. Br J Clin Psychol. 1983;22:19,32.

11. Rippere V. Placebo-controlled tests of chemical food additives: are they valid? Med Hypotheses. 1981;7:819,823.

12. Boris M, Mandel FS. Foods and additives are common causes of the attention deficit hyperactive disorder in children. Ann Allergy. 1994;72:462,468.

13. Schoenthaler SJ, Crook WG, Brenner A, et al. Sugar and children's behavior [letters]. N Engl J Med. 1994;330:1901,1904.

14. Weiss B. Food additives and environmental chemicals as sources of childhood behavior disorders. J Am Acad Child Psychiatry. 1982;21:144,152.

15. Weiss B, Williams JH, Margen S, et al. Behavioral responses to artificial food colors. Science. 1980;207:1487,1489.

16. Wolraich ML, Wilson DB, White JW. The effect of sugar on behavior or cognition in children. A meta-analysis. JAMA. 1995;274:1617,1621.

17. Schmidt MH, Mocks P, Lay B, et al. Does oligoantigenic diet influence hyperactive/conduct-disordered children—a controlled trial. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997;6:88,95.

18. Breakey J. The role of diet and behaviour in childhood. J Paediatr Child Health. 1997;33:190,194.

19. Krummel DA, Seligson FH, Guthrie HA. Hyperactivity: is candy causal? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 1996;36:31,47.

20. Voigt RG, Llorente AM, Jensen CL, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. J Pediatr. 2001;139:189,196.

21. Aman MG, Mitchell EA, Turbott SH. The effects of essential fatty acid supplementation by Efamol in hyperactive children. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 1987;15:75,90.

22. Arnold LE, Kleykamp D, Votolato NA, et al. Gamma-linolenic acid for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: placebo-controlled comparison to D-amphetamine. Biol Psychiatry. 1989;25:222,228.

23. Van Oudheusden L, Scholte H. Efficacy of carnitine in the treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2002;67:33.

24. Starobrat-Hermelin B, Kozielec T. The effects of magnesium physiological supplementation on hyperactivity in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Positive response to magnesium oral loading test. Magnes Res. 1997;10:149,156.

25. Field TM, Quintino O, Hernandez-Reif M, et al. Adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder benefit from massage therapy. Adolescence. 1998;33:103-8.

26. Bilici M, Yildirim F, Kandil S et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of zinc sulfate in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2004;28:181-90.

27. Akhondzadeh S, Mohammadi MR, Khademi M. Zinc sulfate as an adjunct to methylphenidate for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children: A double blind and randomized trial [ISRCTN64132371]. BMC Psychiatry. 2004 Apr 8 [Epub ahead of print]

28. Arnold LE, Pinkham SM, Votolato N. Does zinc moderate essential fatty acid and amphetamine treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivifty disorder? J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2000;10:111-117

29. Stevens L, Zhang W, Peck L et al. EFA supplementation in children with inattention, hyperactivity, and other disruptive behaviors. Lipids. 2003;38:1007-21.]



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Old 09-29-05, 12:36 PM
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Arrow

ahhhhhh i understand LOL
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Old 09-30-05, 02:06 PM
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I take the Flax oil, not capsules. I take 0.10 cc per day.

My doc gave it to me for depression. He also tried to put me on a High / prescribed dose of multi vitamins, but my insurance wouldn't cover it.
Without ins it was $75.00. So I just take a normal multi-vitaman everyday.

I didni't know about the fish oil or zinc. I'll have to check that out.

I do know that he said that it can take up to 6 weeks to see the benefits from the vitamins, much like the anti-depressants they use.
I opted to do both the anti-depressant (Zoloft) and the vitaman supplements,

Of course, that's because I am too impatient to wait 6 weeks to find out one doesn't work, and wait 6 more to try the other.
So I won't know which on I am benefitting from either.

Thanks for the natural > read.

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Old 10-02-05, 08:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karennerak
I've been taking Omega 3 fish oil capsules daily, for the last week...

I used to take them irregulary, some time ago, but this time, i'm trying to take them regulary, to see if the supplement helps my ADHD in any way.

I'm not too sure, what dosage i should take though, so, if anyone here, can help me out, i would appreciate it.. Cheers!
Take 6 fish oil caps per day.
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Old 10-04-05, 03:16 PM
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Have a look at http://www.durhamtrial.org/ where " Dramatic results were seen within just 3 months of the Dyspraxia trial. The active group supplementing with fatty acids saw significant improvements in reading (9.5 months), spelling (6.5 months) and behaviour, compared to the placebo group where no overall improvement was made.Dramatic results were seen within just 3 months of the Dyspraxia trial". Not saying that you can't spell or read !
Good luck
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Old 10-04-05, 03:40 PM
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Iv bin taiking phish oyal capsulz fer 6 weaks noww, an my speling haz improoved dramatticcally!
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