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  #196  
Old 05-12-09, 08:00 PM
carissa_lee carissa_lee is offline
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

I'm sorry, I read through 2 pages, but couldn't make it through all 13. I tried googling for this question also. I guess I don't understand the difference between ADHD-I and SCT? What does SCT bring to the table that ADHD-I doesn't? Because it most definetely sounds like me - but so does everything I read about ADHD-I, which I have been diagnosed with. I just can't seem to find anything that shows me the differences between the two, to see if a diagnosis of SCT (or just discovering more about it) is worth my time to go forward with. It seems treatments for the two are similar, but I also saw a lot of Adderall-only treatment responses regarding SCT, where as ADHD-I you can take any stimulant that helps you. I'm currently on Vyvanse for my ADHD-I but I would like to know if it's worth it to discuss switching to Adderall instead, if I really do have SCT... or if there is a difference. I also saw a lot of people discussing their issues with math - one thing I've never had an issue with. I was actually in pre-calc my junior year of high school, but my high school only required 3 years of math to graduate and moving on to calculus would require going to a class at the local community college, at the time I didn't have a car so I just gave up math. I guess I'm just confused with the differences.

Thank you to whoever answers that. I really did try reading through but after about 2 pages I couldn't focus anymore :-/


I also have the auditory problem mentioned above - someone can tell me directions or instructions on something and halfway through their sentence I wont remember the first part of what they said, so I'll start thinking about it, which makes me miss the second part of what they end up saying, so I have to ask them to repeat. I've also purchased a cell phone with GPS on it, because whenever anyone would give me directions and I tried to follow them I would get lost within 5 minutes. I've lived in the same city for my entire life, and I still get lost in my surrounding neighborhoods.
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  #197  
Old 05-12-09, 08:26 PM
Technojunkie Technojunkie is offline
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

Short answer: SCT is ADHD-I with the processing speed component of the standard IQ test scoring ~30 points below the other components.
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  #198  
Old 05-20-09, 02:26 AM
Jakesnake Jakesnake is offline
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

Hello, I was reading through information on (SCT) and found that it described me almost perfectly. I'll just share some information that you may find true also.

-18 year old male, who has had Slow Cognitive Tempo symptoms since a very young age. (3-4).
-Shy, introvert, daydreamy, avoid confrontations, don't like to answer the phone, loss for words, hard to concentrate "on what to say" when in a conversation, usually agree with everyone on everything.
-Play video games or stay on my computer to (3 minute delay thought here) to get stimulation
- I have a hard time thinking of synonyms for words.
- almost always tired (even when on energy drinks)
- lacking motivation, or find purposelessness in almost everything.
- regularly try ...events to ... ... create a sense of ... excitement.
- Very hard time waking up in the morning
- specific mathematical problem solving skills are poor at best
- I'm a good reader, but often jumble words.
- very self conscious (even though I shouldn't be)
- nothing seems to rattle me (dangerous or risk taking situations
- I talk very low key and motonous, almost tone deaf
- I focus on certain thoughts FAR too long (they may even be meaningless), and I know that I should be thinking of other things more important in my life.
- ...damnit I had a good one here but I just forgot.
- not mechanically inclined at all. If I were to build a model car from instructions, I would probably build it the wrong way twice before building it a different wrong way.
- I learn best by example.
- I'm a deep thinker, so psychological concepts come easy to me.
- (remembered the good one ^) I'm clumsy. I'll repeatedly mess up on simple tasks i've done before.
- I tend to "overthink" everything, which is why i'm slightly slower. (Especially when learning new concepts!)
- I'm extremely physically fit. Part of this is due to pain management skills due to my calm and cool attitude. or persona. (theres that synonym problem again). I can dive in a pool of freezing water, or hold my breath for long periods of time without stressing about it because I'm not easily shaken.
- I show little emotion. Not by choice, but just because it's how I really feel. Some people get ****ed off if they forget something. I just say "oh well, no big deal." I also haven't honestly cried about something for years.
- I wouldn't consider myself depressed, but I wouldn't say im happy either.
- I am a gifted speller. I won a spelling bee in 8th grade without studying

There's probably more stuff I could add but I'm tired right now. Normally I would go back and read through what I just wrote to improve my sentence structure but it's late and I'm even more tired than normal....

Just some things real quick that might help other people with SCT, that helped me.

-Hang out with friends that extroverts. They help bring about situations that are easy to add an opinion, and make you feel more comfortable in general about things.
- To improve learning, clear your mind of all your other thoughts. If someone is telling you how to do something, visually picture what they are telling you in your head.
- Try things that you might think are dangerous, (like a backflip on a trampoline). You might surprise yourself at how calmly you are able to do this.

well that's all I have to say. I hope that in my cluttered sentences someone has attained information that they can relate to.
anyone can email me if they have any questions.

Last edited by sarek; 05-20-09 at 04:13 AM..
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  #199  
Old 05-20-09, 04:12 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

Thats me 100%.
Though I must say getting the right stimuli, such as being around the right people, does wonders for my wellbeing
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Old 05-20-09, 07:33 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

Jakesnake: I found that quitting sugary soft drinks, and I suspect that your energy drinks qualify, made me considerably less sleepy. Switching to diet soda caused different problems. Tea seems to undo the damage sodas caused. Getting artificials out of my diet helped too.

Go to Convergence Insufficiency and use it to refer you to an optometrist who can properly check your eyes since you "often jumble words". In your case it's probably not CI but a good doc will check for other eye problems too. Most docs only check whether you have 20/20 vision and ignore eye muscle problems (CI, tracking, etc). Heavy video gaming can really screw up your eyes if there's an eye problem too. It's well worth ruling out any eye problems while you're still young and no serious damage has been done.

It sounds like you might have high-functioning Asperger's Syndrome and that you're adapting better than I did. Most adapt on their own by the time they're around 30, learning the socialization skills that "normal" people know by instinct. It's not a big deal, just something to be aware of. You're probably excessively honest too, right? Read The Geek Syndrome.
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Old 05-28-09, 12:16 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

Just joined to post in here - SCT describes me exactly. I read the Wikipedia entry and then came here - why isn't there more information on this subject?? This is ridiculous...I finally found something that completely embodies my symptoms and there's no definitive answer for treatment

Warning: The rest of this post is huge, sorry, I just couldn't stop typing

I saw countless doctors and therapists without really any improvements or positive results. As I've skimmed through this thread, I see that others have bumped around in the dark and found things that worked here and there the same as I have. It's quite frustrating and slow to do without any kind of pre-defined help, so I was very excited to find this thread!

As far as treatment goes, I am very much as anti-drug as possible. I tried Prozac a few years ago and had really negative results and swore off drugs unless absolutely, totally, completely necessary. The best results I've had are from the following:

1. Early bedtime (around 9:00pm)
2. Small, healthy meals (6 meals every few hours)
3. 15 minutes of exercise a day (cardio)

Once I cleaned up my health picture, things really improved. The bedtime is a biggie - the magic hours seem to be 9-12pm, if I hit those, I really do a lot better the next day. The meals help keep my energy up, but the sleep is what keeps my motivation up. Then some exercise to round things out. So the health-control aspect has been one of the biggest means of self-improvement I've come across.

I discovered I had a number of allergies, including a Type II Dairy Allergy and an allergy to High Fructose Corn Syrup. I have some mild intolerances to other foods (processed food, vegetable oil, fried foods, chocolate, sugar). Physically I felt a TON better after fixing those. For the depression, sleep is what has helped the most.

Once I got feeling better physically, I was better able to deal with the depression aspect. I discovered that aside from the physical effects, depression is...for lack of a better phrase, easy to treat. I found a book series by David Burns about 'feeling good' (he wrote "The Feeling Good Handbook", among others). If you're struggling with depression, the two things I'd recommend right off the bat are clean up your health picture and pick up this workbook - "Ten Days to Self Esteem":

http://www.amazon.com/Ten-Days-Self-...dp/0688094554/

For health, the order of importance for me is sleep, diet, then exercise. Early bedtime is key. My guess is that most of us suffering from SCT struggle with staying up late, at least if you all are anything like I am. Sleep helped the most, followed by food. I basically learned how to cook meals at home instead of going out to eat, and learned how to eat healthy - minimal preservatives and chemicals, cut out soda and candy, etc. Again, those things helped a TON - once I felt physically better, the 10 Days to Self Esteem workbook really helped a lot.

Eye therapy has been a big recent breakthrough for me. I didn't really have trouble reading and definitely didn't have dyslexia, but words always kind of floated around, had trouble with textbooks, and so on, all the stuff that's already been described in relation to reading. I got hooked up with an eye therapist and started doing that a year or so ago. I had to quit temporarily due to school expenses ($125 per session out of pocket = $500 a month!!!), but I'm looking forward to getting back into it this summer.

I really had no idea how my vision was affecting so many things...I had a lazy eye when I was a kid, that was fixed with a patch, and I wear glasses now, but once I went through the initial tests I was blown away at how whacked-out my eyesight was. It was unreal actually physically SEEING how my eyes worked, like with the red/blue transparency tests. So I'll definitely be looking into that Convergence Insufficiency stuff.

Another guy's system has helped me a lot, David Allen, author of "Getting Things Done". I have trouble finishing what I start and keeping my focus on the tasks at hand - his system is NOT easy, but for people with this so-called SCT it can REALLY REALLY REALLY help if you struggle with being disorganzed and have a hard time just getting done what you need to. Here's a link to his book:

http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Things...dp/0142000280/

My four biggest problems right now are audible focus, learning, short-term memory, and sleep. I have an incredibly difficult time keeping up with the lectures in college. I get behind in minutes when a professor is speaking. I just can't keep up no matter how hard I try. My IQ is very high (not saying that to brag, but to illustrate as others have - bright does not equal successful results), but try getting me to focus in school. Yeah, right.

Learning is also difficult, and is fuzzy as other have described - I have trouble with math, but I have no trouble with computers. English is not a problem, but science is a struggle. I have trouble putting things together in my head, math again being the prime example. I've tried describing it to teachers, family, therapists, etc., and they mostly just think it's stupid, but I'm so glad that I'm not alone in this...it's not that I can't grasp math, it's just that I have some kind of problem in whatever this is...it's fuzzy, I don't know lol.

I also have a hard time following arguments, whether they're math arguments or arguments with people, whatever. I can't follow anything in my head. I can't do simple math in my head. I HAVE to put it down on paper. If I get into an argument with someone, a minute or two into it and I'm totally lost in the maze in my head and have forgotten about exactly what points were made and what we're arguing about. On paper I can do it no problem - I can handle forum threads with ease. In person, no dice. Math, talking, everything. Big struggle there too.

My sleeping problem is that I'm tired all the time. My dad found out recently that he has sleep apnea, so I have "get tested for sleep apnea" on my to-do list, but the problem is I do GREAT if I go to bed really early. I'm talking between 8:30-9:00pm. I call it GBS - Geriatric Bedtime Syndrome (funny because I'm only 25, but have to go to bed in order not to be useless the next day). So I don't *think* it's sleep apnea, it's more like being allergic to staying up late - naps don't help, I have to go to bed really early for a few days to catch up on my deficiet, and then keep going to bed early to feel solid throughout a day. It makes no sense and I've never heard of anyone else EVER having this kind of weird sleeping problem. I don't know if it's related to SCT or not.

Bottom line, if I hit my sleep window at around 8:30-8:45pm and then let myself wake up naturally, I start waking up naturally (no alarm) around 4-5am and feel fabulous ALL DAY LONG. It's really, really difficult because of nighttime distractions (thanks to Night Guy, as Seinfeld described haha), but I do *loads* better, it's really a night and day difference for me in terms of mental motivation. Otherwise I just drag, it becomes a depression day and I couldn't care less emotionally about anything.

Last but not least, short-term memory. This is pretty much what I was talking about with following arguments - I just kind of blank out. I've found I do much better when I'm going to bed early, consistently, but it still doesn't completely solve the problem. But it does help a LOT, obviously that is partly a symptom of being tired.

So going back to the main thing, SCT, that Wikipedia entry just made me so happy - finally something that really described ME! Brain fog? Check. Depression? Check. Physically passive due to lack of motivation? Check. I've long thought I've had ADD due to having such a hard time focusing on things, finishing projects, following audible lectures, and so on, but the rest of the ADD/ADHD symptoms just didn't fit the bill and I personally didn't feel that drugs were the right answer for me.

The last 5 years has been a real growth period for me. I've really focused in on it, almost making it my hobby to better myself from whatever this crap is that plagues me, and I've found a number of things that help a bunch, as I talked about above. I'm still not 100% where I'd like to be (i.e. "normal"), but I'm lightyears ahead of functioning where I was before. I've talked with a few other people who have symptoms similar to mine and have outlined a basic course for self-help.

Plan for Self-Treating SCT: (basic plan, non-doctor-approved)

1. Go to bed early. SLEEP, SLEEP, EARLY SLEEP, LOTS OF SLEEP, SLEEP SLEEP SLEEP SLEEP. I can't over-emphasize this enough. This is the #1 cure of depression I've ever found, anywhere, period, end of story. And if you're like most people with depression, your immediate reaction will be "no, that doesn't matter", "that's not worth doing", "I don't want to do that", "I can't do that", "I don't care". If you care at all or are serious about fixing your current state, then you NEED to do this. Don't brush this off!!

At least do try it for 2 straight weeks, no cheating - lights out at 9:00pm. It literally took me 4-5 hours a night to fall asleep when I started. It was horribly boring. Get an audio book if you need help, but as the pyschologists say, only use your bed for sleeping and love-making, not for reading, not for TV watching, not for goofing off on your laptop or cell phone. It took me probably 2 months to get to where I could fall asleep within 15-20 minutes, but it was worth it. The difference you will feel is absolutely astounding. I've helped a small number of people with depression with my shared experiences and this is always the #1 best thing to do out of everything.

What I have to do is, turn off my computer and television one full hour before bed, so that means 8:00 I turn off the glowing light sources (they stimulate your brain, or so the docs say). I take this time to get my backpack ready, find clothes for the next day, write a list of what I need to get done tomorrow, etc., and usually read (but not online!).

2. Food is the second thing to focus on. Sleep provides mental energy, motivation if you will, and to an extent physical energy, but you also need fuel for your physical energy. In my opinion, the right way to eat is 5-6 small meals a day. Or 7-8 small meals if you have a super high metabolism. Food is SUCH a big deal. I was a junk food junkie, at at McDonalds all the time, lived off Snickers, etc. I was in total denial of how it affected me.

Do yourself a favor - drop soda, drop candy, drop junk food, and learn how to eat well. Minimize preservatives and chemicals. What really helped me was reading about how food works at BodyBuilding.com, those guys are super into health and eat very strict diets. I'm not a bodybuilder and don't lift weights, but their style of diet plans has made a night and day difference for me physically. When combined with sleep, I constantly feel bouyed up and able to do what I need to do thanks to the energy it provides both mentally and physically.

Watch out for low-fat and diet foods, like diet soda or low-fat mayo, a lot of times they contain some nasty chemicals and you'd be way better off just having the real thing, lol. I had a really hard time getting used to drinking mostly water, but it is doable and once you get over the initial "this is haaaaaard!" hump, it's really easy. Right now I eat small meals every 2-3 hours, like a 1/2 a turkey sandwich on whole wheat bread and some baked chips. It took about a week (I call it the "rite of passage" because it was so difficult to do) to get the sugar and crap out of my body, and after that I started feeling TONS TONS TONS better. That first week I had ridiculous cravings and just felt disgustingly sick because I wasn't feeling my sugar and junk food addiction. After that, I felt so much better I didn't even care! Plus it was easy to curb junk food cravings when you're eating all day long 6 meals sounds like a lot, but it only takes a couple minutes to eat half a sandwich or a small tuna wrap or something, so it's no big deal.

I also don't (and didn't before) touch alcohol, drugs, and caffiene. That includes coffee and tea. If you're on those, get the heck off ASAP!

3. Exercise is very important. You don't need much - 15 minutes of cardio is plenty. Get an exercise bike, a jump rope, or if you can talk yourself into it, go for a brisk walk outside. Go outside for 10 minutes in the sun everyday to get your Vitamin D. You don't need to be an athlete, a runner, a fitness enthusiast, or a bodybuilder - put on a TV show and walk fast on a treadmill, whatever works for you. I can tell you having a workout buddy increases your likelihood of doing this by about a thousand percent

4. Read and write inside the "10 Days to Self Esteem" workbook by David Burns. If you suffer from and struggle with depression, I've never found a better resource for understanding why and how it works. Once I got my physical stuff under control (early bedtime + awesome diet), I found I was still struggling with my thoughts - this really helped me figure things out. It basically says depression is all in your head, and here's how to fix it. I think depression is often enhanced by underlying physical conditions, so once I got the health part taken care of, I could clearly seeing, with the aid of this book, where I was "off" and how to fix it. Yay (I should probably note I have no affiliation with any of the books I'm talking about). Also check out his other books, they make for good reading if you want to understand depression better, and why it happens in your thought processes and how to fix it.

As a side note here: for the longest time, I searched for a "magic answer" to all my problems. There had to be something fundamentally wrong with me, a tumor, or a disease, or something. The reality and truth of the matter was that it was a combination of things, many of which are solvable through hard work. It's hard to do hard work. But it's doable! For example, going to bed early may not sound like hard work (for those of you who do, which I suspect is very few here with SCT, my hat is off to you), but once you try it you will find out how big of a struggle it is and how difficult it can be to do consistently.

What I'm getting at here is that the only person who really, truly cares about your physical health and well-being is you. That means you can keep looking for a magic bullet to come and fix all your problems for you, which gives you an excuse to do nothing and not really try to go to bed early or eat right or use the workbook I mentioned, or you can do something about it. I did nothing for a long, long time. Oh sure, I went to doctors, I went to therapists, I tried medicine, all those kinds of things. But what I'm sharing here is what has worked wonders for me and for others with problems similar to mine.

Don't underestimate (1) your physical health in relation to SCT, and (2) your ability to use available resources to make progress in dealing with it. When I started seriously, SERIOUSLY taking care of my health, my SCT situation improved a TON. I didn't do this until April 2008 - I kept telling myself there was some magic bullet, something magically wrong with me that could be fixed while I lived the same lifestyle. I had good excuses - terrible focus problems, depression, trouble thinking especially in school - but at the end of the day they were just excuses. So that's the health side, then the resources like the self esteem book and getting things done book have really helped. It requires habit changes, which are never easy and take weeks of focused effort to adopt, but it's doable!

Okay, I'll get off my soapbox and back to my "progressive plan" here

5. The "Getting Things Done" book by David Allen. I love starting projects. Do I ever finish them? Like .001% of the time. Typical ADD behavior, right? I was super disorganized, always late replying to things, doing things I had to do, not being overwhelmed, not falling into action-item paralysis and surfing the net all day in my pajamas. This book really, really helped me learn how to get things done. Instead of feeling overwhelmed all the time, and mostly ending up doing nothing to make progress on things (other than super-focusing on things that didn't really matter, haha), this helps you learn how to deal with action items and stay organized. Again it's NOT an easy system to fully adopt, but BOY will you be more effective at taking care of your life's "stuff" after doing it!

6. If applicable, vision therapy. I thought this had nothing to do with the SCT type of symptoms, but it's really made a difference, surprisingly.

7. Learning how to study. I've been learning how to, well, learn. Having a system for studing and learning has started to help me improve my school life and professional life. This vision thing tied into this for me, as well as sleep and diet. Feeling good really helps you study!

**************

So while I'm not yet in the "perfect" physical/mental state I dream of being in, I've made enormous strides towards living a MUCH happier life with the above steps. It's taken years and years to figure out what works, and what doesn't. The results of SCT are so strange, like the Wikipedia entry says - it manifests itself academically, along with anxiety, depression, and social withdrawl, and all the other day in the article and in this thread.

The funny thing is, most of use seem to be great forum nerds, but I'd bet if you dropped all of us with SCT in a math class, the teacher would have a heart attack because we'd all be spacing out lol.

Anyway, glad to find out I'm not alone with this and that I'm not crazy Looking forward to hearing more thoughts on treatment from everybody!

Edit: Also wanted to say, I'm not discounting perscription drugs. For some people, they are definitely the right solution. I just personally believe in avoiding them unless absolutely necessary. I've found (1) in many cases, you develop a tolerance to them and the effects wear off, and (2) there are ALWAYS side effects. In the past 5 years or so, I've discovered how instrumental managing your physical health is in relation to dealing with SCT, so that's what I've chosen to focus a lot of my attention on.
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  #202  
Old 05-28-09, 12:29 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

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Feeling okay is not acceptable
Hah, wow. I like that! I'm going to use this as my forum signature!
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Old 05-28-09, 05:35 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)


i also have severe social phobia, which has been very debilitating in my life but lately i've been taking gradual steps in treating it through exposure and i've been fairly successfull though i still struggle and it's still very difficult. i'm very curious to see if that improves through the use of adderall as a lot of my difficulties socializing, my lack of social skills and lack of confidence in speaking partly have to do with my constant awareness of language problems and my slow responsiveness/mental processing. should be intersting.



i admit i wish i could read through all of this thread without skipping past long posts, hahaha.[/quote]


I found that Prozac really helped with my social inhibition/self consciousness. I originally went on it for depression, then found out it also helped my PMS. I later cut back on the dosage to just 2 or 3 pills a week. You can do this with Prozac due to it's long half life.

I later went back to taking it every day when I was going through my divorce. Now, I'm once again only taking it 2 or 3 days a week to prevent depression. The social phobia seems to have been permanently reduced because even on the really low dosing schedule it hasn't returned.

I came to realize that there was absolutely no reason for feeling social anxiety and I sort of reprogrammed my brain.
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Old 05-28-09, 09:10 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

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Originally Posted by Addelerious View Post
I found that Prozac really helped with my social inhibition/self consciousness. I originally went on it for depression, then found out it also helped my PMS. I later cut back on the dosage to just 2 or 3 pills a week. You can do this with Prozac due to it's long half life.

I later went back to taking it every day when I was going through my divorce. Now, I'm once again only taking it 2 or 3 days a week to prevent depression. The social phobia seems to have been permanently reduced because even on the really low dosing schedule it hasn't returned.

I came to realize that there was absolutely no reason for feeling social anxiety and I sort of reprogrammed my brain.
That last bit was a key for me. But before I explain that, I want to say I had tried Prozac, which helped with some things, but I could NOT sleep on it - I was awake 24/7 for a week straight basically, I called it "ProCrack" haha. Swore it off completely after that. Amazing how different reactions can be eh

Anyway, in my particular situation, I struggled with social anxiety since I was in grade school. In middle school I was having up to 6 panic attacks a day, which made my life utter hell to live. Nothing I've ever experienced has been as horrible as a panic attack. Fortunately, these lessened when I was in high school and eventually faded away, but the anxiety was still there. A couple years ago, I discovered I had a Type II Milk Allergy...after going completely off all milk ingredients (casein, whey, and lactose) for a full week, not only did I feel incredibly better (no more migraines or asthma, among other things), but to my surprise the bulk of my anxiety was gone.

For some background, I had a number of kidney surgeries as a child and suspect that that is what triggered a chemical imbalance and resulted in my dairy allergy, because it wasn't until after my last surgery that things went wrong. I dropped out of my gifted classes in 5th grade and couldn't even scrounge along in the easiest classes school had to offer. I had a terrible time with anxiety and panic attacks. I couldn't focus, couldn't follow along in class lectures, and so on. So from what I can tell, this was a big trigger for the rest of the SCT symptoms.

For me, the key driver for the anxiety was a food allergy. I tried telling myself it was in my head, I tried dealing with it, re-thinking it, sucking it up, etc. The simple fact of the matter was that it was a chemical problem within my body - once I got the food situation dialed in, my life became a lot better. It was amazing to feel calm the majority of the time, and not have my heartrate accelerate for no apparently reason!

Anyway, once I got discovered how closely my health and my anxiety was tied together, I got to work on dealing with the depression side of things, which was only partially affected by the food allergy. I was tired of therapists, they never helped with anything - it was like going to doctors, they just didn't have the right answers for me. So I decided to take it into my own hands and start doing a lot of research and reading.

The guy who nailed the problem for me was David Burns, the author of the Feeling Good series. Basically, the guiding principle is that you feel how you think. So you reprogram the way you think, as you mentioned. It helped TREMENDOUSLY. Burns says that the "price" of happiness lies in your willingness to want to help yourself, and to take action to adopt the principles he teaches. I found that I had been using my SCT as a crutch or an excuse to not try the harder things, but instead just go the doctor/therapist/medicine/don't care route. I wanted a magic bullet solution instead of having to try "stupid" stuff like changing my thinking patterns, eating better, or going to bed earlier. Boy was I wrong, haha.

I want to re-iterate my SCT system: I had a severe food allergy plus an apparently chemical imbalance causing a lot of symptoms, plus cognitive distortions as talked about in the "Ten Days to Self-Esteem Book" by David Burns. So yes, part of it was "in my head", but the driving force behind that was an underlying health problem. This was a BIG deal in getting me to make progress in how I felt day to day.

One other thing I've found to help is a strict routine. I hate routines. Well, I hate the idea of a routine. I don't like feeling trapped in a to-do list of items laid out for a day, but once you get going on it, you discover it's just a fear of the idea, rather than the actual thing itself. I can elaborate more on my routine later, if anyone is interested. I really like David Allen's approach of "Getting Things Done", because rather than feeling locked into a hard, item-by-item approach to the day, I pick and choose what I do, and only am "locked" into the appointments of the day, such as a dentist appointment at 10:00am. That's really helped me a lot, the combination of a routine and learning how to be organized and get things done.

So yeah, going back to the beginning, "reprogramming" my brain was a big help to me. Thanks to David Burns, I gained a much clearer understanding of how my thoughts affected how I feel. And again I want to say that the underlying driver has been health problems, in my case a severe dairy allergy, so it wasn't "just" in my head - much of the anxiety and depression was simply from living in a whacked-out physical state of health.

So it was a combination of health problems and thought problems that did a number on me. Again I'm not completely cured of SCT or anything, but I have a lot more control over how I feel and how I deal with things now than I did before. I still have a lot of trouble in school and I fall off the wagon all the time in terms of staying on top of things, but at least I know how to get back on now
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Old 05-28-09, 09:26 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

After reading through this thread, it seems that a lot of us with SCT have similar problems:

1. Health Management Problems: Stay up late, don't eat very healthy (or not super healthy, at least), zero or little exercise (and these things as driven by lack of motivation caused by depression)
2. Food Allergies: Gluten, dairy, etc. (whether or not they have been identified - I didn't get diagnosed until I was 24 years old)
3. Vision Problems: Convergence insuffiency or other eye therapy needed
4. Trouble with Application-Specific Systems: Studying, routine, finishing projects, staying on task, etc.
5. Cognitive Troubles: Short-term memory problems, issues with following arguments (not on paper/computer though), problems with intensely logical topics like math
6. Depression: Cognitive distortions (mental thinking patterns), physical health as a driver of depression, not suicidal but simply no interest in life at times
7. Classic Anxieties: Social anxiety, panic attacks, etc.
8. Auditory Problems: Trouble following lectures etc.

It's a terrible pit to be in - brain fog, severe anxiety, depression and lack of motivation, focus problems. I think that we have a very specific subset of symptoms that is hard to nail down, but that it really does exist. I vote we figure out a plan for dealing with this better, because no one in the medical community seems to care about this very much judging by the number of SCT entries in google.

Any takers?
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Old 05-28-09, 09:49 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

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Originally Posted by Stabby View Post
Can someone explain to me what is meant by reading deficits? I can read outloud very fast and clear, but understanding what I'm reading at the same time is an entirely different thing. I can read extremely fast, but I usually drift off, not knowing what the text was about.
Yup I have this same exact problem. Physically I can read it out loud no problem, mentally it just goes in one ear and out the other (or in the eyes and out the mouth in this case? )
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Old 05-28-09, 09:53 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

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Originally Posted by Vince View Post
Like Luthien's description, I have been "tested out" as having "a high IQ" (for whatever that is worth), supposedly over 140. HOWEVER, once I got past High School freshman algebra, learning math beyond that was like pulling teeth.

(I tortured and browbeat myself all the way thru Calculus III in college...failing Calc I and Calc II once each before passing....just to "prove to myself I could do it." Of course, within one week after each course was over, I probably forgot 95% of everything).

I'm super good at recalling things that "interest me," or that I "care about," or that "resonate with me"......

.......of course, how to define each of those categories is a whole 'nother story.

I often say, "my brain has a mind of its own," in the sense that I usually feel like there is something like an "inner gyroscope" in my head that has its OWN agenda about what it does and does NOT care about....and that my "conscious mind" can run itself ragged trying to "force" myself to get interested in this or that, or study this or that...but it is like "pounding sand down a rathole."
Yeah...things I'm highly interested in, I can recall. As far as your brain has a mind of it's own, it's like having to babysit your brain sometimes, lol. Or like having a pet dog - you have to consistently point it in the right direction or it just goes off on it's own to play haha. A bit hard to describe, but yeah, I hear you here!
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Old 05-28-09, 10:05 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

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Originally Posted by Captain Obvious View Post
And yes, as has been pointed out, there is no shortage of research on google about SCT. However, this research is dedicated to differentiation only. Not to treatment.

"ADHD inattentive subtype shows different neuroactivity than combined or hyperactive subtype" or something of the sort.

Yeah.... no sh*t..... how do you fix it?
^ I'm with this guy

Maybe I should switch my major from Computer Technology to Psychiatry and start a research program on SCT

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Obvious View Post
I don't even think it's that. It's actually the opposite, at least with me. It's hyperfocus on irrelevant crap. I talked about this with my psychiatrist. A "normal" brain (if there is such a thing) is able to multitask by keeping 90% focused on the current task at hand, while every once in a while the mind trails off to other tasks like, "oh, yeah, I gotta go get milk on the way home" or "I have a meeting at this time." They're still able to revert attention back to the current task in a snap.

ADHD people are unable to do that. It's either 100% or nothing.

Screw that attention "deficit" or "variability" junk. It just appears that way to an observer when, in fact, it's the opposite.
Hear, hear!
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Old 05-28-09, 10:26 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

that's a heck of a post schroeder.

it was so good that I read through pretty much the whole thing

stick around these forums and interject what you've learned into threads where it would fit.

most of us aren't able to read your whole post and digest it all at once, so give it to use again little by little

how long have you been feeling good? do you think your routine will work long term?
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Old 05-28-09, 10:27 AM
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Re: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT)

for those with food alergies - what's it like?

I mean if I have a food allergy and don't know it, what's it doing to me?
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