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  #16  
Old 07-30-07, 10:19 PM
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Yes. Bipolar disorder can sometimes be hard to distinguish from ADHD.

Another one is Pervasive developmental disorder (including asperger's syndrome).
People who have a PDD sometimes are mistakenly diagnosed with ADHD.

Me

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Originally Posted by balanced
I'm thinking you might have missed one. Bipolar Disorder. When I was little I was diagnosed as ADHD, but never medicated. As a teen I then diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. It goes back and forth. Currently I take lamictal, adderall, and klonopin. I don't know what I have, but I know my doctor treats the symptoms.

Both Bipolar disorder and ADHD share many characteristics: impulsivity, inattention, hyperactivity, physical energy, behavioral and emotional lability (behavior and emotions change frequently), frequent coexistence of conduct disorder and oppositional-defiant disorder, and learning problems. Motor restlessness during sleep may be seen in both (children who are bipolar are physically restless at night when "high or manic",though they may have little physical motion during sleep when "low or depressed"). Family histories in both conditions often include mood disorder. Psychostimulants or antidepressants can help in both disorders (that is, depending on the phase of the bipolar disorder). In view of the similarities, it is not surprising that the disorders are hard to tell apart.
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  #17  
Old 07-31-07, 04:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by balanced
I'm thinking you might have missed one. Bipolar Disorder. When I was little I was diagnosed as ADHD, but never medicated. As a teen I then diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. It goes back and forth. Currently I take lamictal, adderall, and klonopin. I don't know what I have, but I know my doctor treats the symptoms.

Both Bipolar disorder and ADHD share many characteristics....
And let's not forget it's not an either/or issue!

Co-morbidities are common with ADHD. I have seen people treated for many combos at the same time, e.g. ADD + depression or bipolar or OCD or Tourette's. That's why, as you note, many physicians these days treat more on the symptoms than on the diagnosis codes.

For me, all of it confirms a "spectrum" sense of things. I see ADD (and its own spectrum of intensity) as the first layer of an onion that can circle out to connect with more aggravated diagnoses, each of which can occur alone or in combination. Thus lots of folks are "only" ADD and remain so, with or without subclinical threads of some other issues, while others may find over time that some other untreated aspects are worsening, or that treating the ADD brings the rest of what still remained to see.

Whether meds for ADD are helpful, alone or in combo, is a highly individual thing to be explored with a skillful MD who refines the aim over time. But behavioral strategies will be useful for anyone with focusing issues and that part could get short shrift if "ADD" was crossed off the menu.

In short, I'd love to see us start framing the mind as a complex ecosystem of linking, evolving interdependencies instead of reducing it to an either/or checklist that never quite fits.
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  #18  
Old 07-31-07, 05:11 PM
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I would add other hormonal disorders or blood disorders and various imbalances, too. Anything threatening homeostasis of the body/brain.


The Parathyroid:

One that comes to mind is Parathyroid Problems: "hyperparathyroidism" or "hypoparathyroidism"!

These diseases often look "mental" (fatigue, inattention, learning problems, behavioural issues) and is often missed. (I once knew a Pediatrician's daughter who has this. She was written off as a "crazy" or "depressed female" for a long time. She has school problems like LD/ADD inattention, too.)

MS & other myelination or muscle degenerative diseases:

Early stage MS also has "mental" symptoms of inattention, learning issues, behavioural problems, etc.

Delirium States:
e.g. infections (incl pneumonia, etc), toxicities, organ failure problems, shock, blood loss, injuries, endocrine hormones, imbalances, hypoxia, anemia, etc. (can create all varying levels of delirium, which could have 'inattention' or 'restlessness' as a feature)

Airway Issues:
Also, TONSILS and ADENOIDS can obstruct an airway so much (in daytime and nighttime) that a child's growing brain does not get the air (O2) that it needs.

I read about a case of a girl with "retardation" and "learning problems" who, in fact, had this problem (Dr. Meier Kryga's book?). Sadly, her brain had developed in an Oxygen-Starved environment, so her problems were lifelong.

---

These lists are quite endless!
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Old 07-31-07, 05:15 PM
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All of these things underscore the need to SEE A DOCTOR if you think you have ADHD.

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Old 02-09-08, 08:03 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimmic ADHD, PART I

I'm glad to have read this. I'm already seeing a naturopath, and it seems I do have a food allergy. My pdoc thinks it's odd I am doing this. funny, it seems to me that my diet has ALOT to do with everything.

My pdoc is trying to get me on lithium. And I won't because something isn't right. I'm amazed being the amount of research my doctor has done, that she isn't supportive enough.
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  #21  
Old 02-09-08, 09:16 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimmic ADHD, PART I

This is a good list Speedo - it's good to see it here, (and become sticky).

I think one of the important points for people who are unsure of what they have, (or whether they think they have been diagnosed incorrectly), is that a lot of these conditions that mimmic ADHD/ADD are short lived. So, the question you should ask yourself is: "Has this been happening all my life?". If 'yes', then you can wipe off nearly all these conditions apart from a couple - basically genetic disorders, and lead/mercury poisoning, (which accrues in the body and never releases).
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Old 05-23-08, 12:08 AM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimmic ADHD, PART I

I find it pretty surprising the some people are so quick to dismiss all of those conditions and being completely bogus.

To the person ruling out all those conditions -- are you even qualified to be doing that? Doing some quick google searching that explain the symptoms briefly are not enough to determine if something is bogus or not.

Most of these conditions can have a variety of symptoms that show up in a variety of ways. Many times they can indeed be mistaken for AD/HD.

A lot of people medicated for AD/HD right now could have other underlying conditions that could *actually* be causing it.

My two cents
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Old 05-24-08, 09:17 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimmic ADHD, PART I

Might post various thoughts on these 50 things(In my own random order):

1. Hypothyroidism. Personally my mother, brother and myself have it. The symptoms I noted were cold intolerance and fatigue. Which improved with
thyroxine but it did not correct any of my core ADHD related deficits[inattention, impulsivity].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism#Adults symptoms

http://thyroid.about.com/od/thyroidb.../a/5lies_2.htm

That mentions the Barnes temperature method (and its limitations)of determining if you might have low thyroid. In my case my body temperture was quite low upon waking (96-97). Oh your body temperture gets lower in the night anyway so this test depends on a normal night of sleep and waking at the normal time.

2. Lead , Pb I had a hair analysis test in 2001 that said I had 40 ppm.
(0-1.4 consider normal) I had the test because I suspected high levels of lead. Hair analysis of Lead is not consider legit by the FDA I should warn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_poisoning

Quote:
The symptoms of chronic lead poisoning include neurological problems, such as reduced cognitive abilities, or nausea, abdominal pain, irritability, insomnia, metal taste in oral cavity, excess lethargy or hyperactivity, headache and, in extreme cases, seizure and coma. There are also associated gastrointestinal problems, such as constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, poor appetite, weight loss, which are common in acute poisoning. Other associated effects are anemia, kidney problems, and reproductive problems.
I would say I had: reduced cognitive abilities,irritability, insomnia, metal taste in oral cavity, excess lethargy ,gastrointestinal problems, kidney pain, poor appetite.

I took DMSA and in just a few days I had an extreme increase in energy levels. Though the perception of increased energy faded quickly. I took it in the normal treatment protocol. Over the years I studied up on Lead .Some of
the effects of lead are permanent particularly to those 6 and under. Also most
your bodies lead burden will be in hard tissue like bones. So even if you completely eliminate your environmental exposure and under go treatment you can anticipate your blood levels will rebound. R-alpha-lipoic acid has been shown in studies in combination with DMSA to reduce lead burden from the brain.

Oxidative stress similar to methamphetamine neurotoxicity is part of how lead damages the brain. And a number of similar antioxidants used to prevent methamphetamine neurotoxicity have been used to prevent the damages from lead. Though if their much good after exposure is not clear, but since it will be nearly impossible to get blood lead levels to zero you might could mitigate future toxicity.

Its impossible to say how much lead has played a role in my inattention and impulsivity but unfortunately treatment did not reduce the deficits.
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Old 06-28-08, 01:19 AM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimmic ADHD, PART I

Quote:
Originally Posted by theta View Post
2. Lead , Pb I had a hair analysis test in 2001 that said I had 40 ppm.
(0-1.4 consider normal) I had the test because I suspected high levels of lead. Hair analysis of Lead is not consider legit by the FDA I should warn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_poisoning



I would say I had: reduced cognitive abilities,irritability, insomnia, metal taste in oral cavity, excess lethargy ,gastrointestinal problems, kidney pain, poor appetite.

I took DMSA and in just a few days I had an extreme increase in energy levels. Though the perception of increased energy faded quickly. I took it in the normal treatment protocol. Over the years I studied up on Lead .Some of
the effects of lead are permanent particularly to those 6 and under. Also most
your bodies lead burden will be in hard tissue like bones. So even if you completely eliminate your environmental exposure and under go treatment you can anticipate your blood levels will rebound. R-alpha-lipoic acid has been shown in studies in combination with DMSA to reduce lead burden from the brain.

Oxidative stress similar to methamphetamine neurotoxicity is part of how lead damages the brain. And a number of similar antioxidants used to prevent methamphetamine neurotoxicity have been used to prevent the damages from lead. Though if their much good after exposure is not clear, but since it will be nearly impossible to get blood lead levels to zero you might could mitigate future toxicity.

Its impossible to say how much lead has played a role in my inattention and impulsivity but unfortunately treatment did not reduce the deficits.
theta, if I was you I would also do blood and urine tests to monitor Lead levels rather than just relying on one hair analysis result and your symptoms being consistent with Lead toxicity. You could see what

I know in my own case, while my hair Lead levels weren't abnormally high, the hair mineral analysis showed that my Lead to Iron ratio was abnormally high - which was bad in their report. Anyway I had my blood levels of Iron and Lead tested, and everything came out normal. My urine Lead levels were normal as well.

I know you are male and males aren't advised to take Iron supplements unless there is something wrong with their Iron levels, but have a look at some papers (see below) of the relationship between Iron and Lead and ADHD...

Like you mention, the neurotoxicity damage of Lead in your 'developing brain' may have already been done but still it might be worthwhile to make sure your Iron levels are sufficient. Serum Ferritin is the test that is needed.

Be very careful if you do try to supplement with something like Iron of course- excessive iron levels are said to commonly contribute to health problem in males. Still, if I had ADHD and excessive Lead levels (shown by Blood, Hair, and/or Urine), I would want to make sure I carefully tried increasing my Iron levels and seeing if there was any kind of improvement in my symptoms.


The short article written below by Konofal and Cortese focus on the potential neuroprotective role of iron against the deleterious effect of lead on the development of ADHD symptoms...

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlere...i?artid=1940080

Journal List > Environ Health Perspect > v.115(8); Aug 2007

PubMed articles by:
Konofal, E.
Cortese, S. Environ Health Perspect. 2007 August; 115(8): A398–A399.
doi: 10.1289/ehp.10304.
Copyright This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original DOI
Perspectives
Correspondence
Lead and Neuroprotection by Iron in ADHD
Eric Konofal and Samuele Cortese
Child Psychopathology Unit, University Hospital Robert Debré, Paris, France, E-mail: eric.konofal@rdb.aphp.fr
The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

We read with special interest the article by Braun et al. (2006). In this large survey, the authors concluded that prenatal exposure to tobacco and environmental lead are risk factors for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
We would like to focus on the potential neuroprotective role of iron against the deleterious effect of lead on the development of ADHD symptoms.

Although the mechanisms underlying ADHD remain unclear, both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. In a recent review on the implication of the dopaminergic system in the etiology of ADHD, Swanson et al. (2007) highlighted the importance of environmental risk factors as possible etiologies of dopamine deficit. Among these environmental factors, Swanson et al. (2007) cited the effects of lead exposure (at levels < 10 μg/dL) on ADHD-related behaviors and ADHD diagnosis.

Lead in the central nervous system may contribute to dopaminergic dysfunction inducing alteration of dopamine release and dopamine receptor density (Gedeon et al. 2001; Lidsky et al. 2003). Moreover, lead may disrupt the structure of the blood–brain barrier function essential for brain integrity (Dyatlov et al. 1998). Interestingly, Wang et al. (2007) recently reported that iron supplementation protects the integrity of the blood–brain barrier against lead insults. On the other hand, iron deficiency could increase the toxic effect of lead, suggesting a potent neuroprotective effect of iron supplementation on dopaminergic dysfunction due to lead exposure (Wright 1999; Wright et al. 2003)

In a controlled comparison group study, we (Konofal et al. 2004) showed that iron deficiency was correlated to ADHD symptoms severity, hypothesizing that iron supplementation may improve symptoms of ADHD in those subjects with low ferritin levels.

Given that lead exposure may contribute to ADHD and iron deficiency may exacerbate deleterious effects caused by lead, we recommend systematically seeking for iron deficiency in children with ADHD. We also think that controlled studies assessing the potential effectiveness of iron supplementation on ADHD symptoms should be encouraged. Such studies could aid the understanding of the complex pathophysiology underlying ADHD and provide effective therapeutic strategies for this disorder.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Below is some more correspondence regarding the article, "Exposures to Environmental Toxicants and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD] in U.S. Children," by Braun et al. from Brondum and the reply from Braun et al. to the comments of both Brondum, and Konofal and Cortese...


Letter: Brondum J
Response: Braun JM, Lanphear BP, Kahn RS, Froehlich T, Auinger P

Environmental Exposures and ADHD

Environ Health Perspect 115:395-399 (2007). doi:10.1289/ehp.10274 available via http://dx.doi.org [Online 24 June 2007]

Referencing: Exposures to Environmental Toxicants and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in U.S. Children

In their article, "Exposures to Environmental Toxicants and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD] in U.S. Children," Braun et al. (2006) advanced our knowledge of the effects of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and lead on the central nervous system of children. With respect to lead exposure, the study, importantly, focused on an older age group (4–15 years) than is generally studied (< 6 years) because of the greater sensitivity of the developing central nervous system to environmental insult early in life [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1997].

In the logistic model used by Braun et al. (2006), the association of ADHD with lead exposure was statistically significant in the highest exposure quintile; however, it was also tenuous. Although not unheard of, the cutoff (p < 0.2) for inclusion of factors and variables associated with ADHD on univariate analysis was generous compared with the commonly used 0.1 or 0.05, and very close to the p-value of the lead–ADHD association of 0.19. The lead–ADHD relationship also exhibited a significant monotonic dose response, so it would have been helpful to know how the authors developed their exposure metric. Why, for example, were quintiles selected rather than another interval scheme, and why were they not of uniform size? Was the reported dose response the only model considered, or did the authors investigate other models, as some have done in studying the relationship of lead exposure and cognition (Canfield et al. 2003)?

Braun et al. (2006) noted that their analyses were limited by the cross-sectional nature of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data they used, precluding adjustment of their model for certain covariates and potential confounders (e.g., parental psychopathology). Based on data from multiple studies, ADHD heritability has been estimated to be about 75% (Biederman and Faraone 2005). Inability to adjust for parental psychopathology is therefore an important limitation, because adjustment would likely reduce—and might eliminate—the associations of ADHD with ETS and lead. In studies of lead exposure and cognition, some of which Braun et al. (2006) cited as being consistent with their findings, the strength of the IQ–lead relationship can be dwarfed by the relationship of IQ to other factors such as parenting and socioeconomic status (Koller et al. 2004). When reporting associations of environmental contaminants and pathology, it seems prudent to maintain a broader perspective, as well as an environmental health perspective.

The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

Jack Brondum
Hennepin County Department of
Human Services and Public Health
Environmental Health and Epidemiology
Hopkins, Minnesota
E-mail: jack.brondum@co.hennepin.mn.us
References

Biederman J, Faraone SV. 2005. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Lancet 366: 237–248.

Braun JM, Kahn RS, Froehlich T, Auinger P, Lanphear BP. 2006. Exposures to environmental toxicants and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in U.S. children. Environ Health Perspect 114:1904–1909.

Canfield RL, Henderson CR Jr, Cory-Schlechta DA, Cox C, Jusko TA, Lanphear BP. 2003. Intellectual impairment in children with blood lead concentrations below 10 µg per deciliter. N Engl J Med 348:1517–1526.

CDC. 1997. Screening Young Children for Lead Poisoning: Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials. Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Koller K, Brown T, Spurgeon, Levy L. 2004. Recent developments in low-level lead exposure and intellectual impairment in children. Environ Health Perspect 112: 987–994.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ADHD: Braun et al. Respond

Environ Health Perspect 115:395-399 (2007). doi:10.1289/ehp.10274R available via http://dx.doi.org [Online 24 June 2007]

We appreciate the comments of Brondum, and Konofal and Cortese, and the opportunity to clarify our results (Braun et al. 2006). It is common practice to select variables with a p-value of 0.2 for inclusion in multivariable models (Katz 1999). Although the association of blood lead levels and ADHD appeared "tenuous" in bivariate analysis (i.e., p = 0.19), this was largely an artifact of our decision to categorize blood lead levels. When we entered lead into our multivariable analysis as a continuous variable, we found a 1.2-fold increased odds [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0–1.4; p = 0.02] of ADHD for each 1.0-µg/dL increase in blood lead levels. The blood lead quintiles were not divided into exactly equal sample sizes because we used weighted percentages to categorize the data. We decided a priori to present the analysis in quintiles to make the results easier to interpret and also to illustrate any dose–response relationships for blood lead levels and ADHD.

As we noted in the "Discussion" of our article (Braun et al. 2006), a limitation of our study was the inability to adjust for parental psychopathology. This is an unfortunate trade-off when using a large nationally representative survey. In other studies, prenatal tobacco exposure has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of ADHD after controlling for parental psychopathology (Mick et al. 2002; Weissman et al. 1999). Although there is considerable experimental and epidemiologic evidence linking lead exposure with behaviors consistent with ADHD, future studies of childhood lead exposure will need to confirm our results by accounting for parental psychopathology and other potential confounders.

The hypothesis proposed by Konofal and Cortese—that iron deficiency may play a role in symptom severity among children with ADHD—is intriguing. Indeed, it was their original research that prompted us to incorporate ferritin as a measure of iron status (Konofal et al. 2004). It is certainly plausible that iron deficiency may confound or modify the effects of environmental lead exposure on ADHD in children. Alternatively, lead exposure may act as a confounder or modifier for the observed effects of iron deficiency with ADHD. Unfortunately, we were not able to examine whether ferritin (or other indicators of iron status) was associated with ADHD symptom severity using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nor did we specifically test for an association between iron deficiency and ADHD. Although iron or other micronutrient supplementation may protect children from lead toxicity, recent evidence from a double-blind randomized trial (Kordas et al. 2005) suggests that iron and zinc supplementation did not appreciably lower blood lead levels or improve child behavior, as measured by the Conners Rating Scales. However, Kordas et al. included only children without anemia in their trial.

The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

Joe M. Braun
Department of Epidemiology
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
E-mail: jmbraun@unc.edu


Bruce P. Lanphear
Robert S. Kahn
Tanya Froehlich
Department of Pediatrics
Cincinnati Children's Hospital
Medical Center
Cincinnati, Ohio
E-mail: bruce.lanphear@chmcc.org


Peggy Auinger
Department of Pediatrics
University of Rochester School of Medicine
Rochester, New York
References

Braun JM, Froehlich TF, Kahn RS, Auinger P, Lanphear BP. 2006. Exposures to environmental toxicants and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in U.S. children. Environ Health Perspect 114:1904–1909.

Katz M. 1999. Multivariable Analysis: A Practical Guide for Clinicians. New York:Cambridge University Press.

Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Arnulf I, Mouren M. 2004. Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 158:1113–1115.

Kordas K, Stoltzfus RJ, Lopez P, Rico JA, Rosado JL. 2005. Iron and zinc supplementation does not improve parent or teacher ratings of behavior in first grade Mexican children exposed to lead. J Pediatr 147:632–639.

Mick E, Biederman J, Faraone SV, Sayer J, Kleinman S. 2002. Case-control study of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and maternal smoking, alcohol use, and drug use during pregnancy. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 41:378–385.

Weissman MM, Warner V, Wickramaratne PJ, Kandel DB. 1999. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and psychopathology in offspring followed to adulthood. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 38:892–899.
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Old 11-16-08, 09:49 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I

what if you are diagnosed as ADHD, ODD, OCD, and feel severly depressed alot? does that mean the ADHD wan't a write daignosis too? honestly how would anyone ever REALLY know if it was honestly ADHD?
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Old 11-17-08, 07:48 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I

I'm sort of displeased with this thread. The reason is that I created the thread as a list of things that look like ADHD but are not ADHD. Some people seem to be interpreting the list as "a list of things that cause ADHD", which it is not.

For example: Food allergy is on the list. The national institute of health has found that ADHD is NOT caused by food allergies. If you have ADHD and you are treating yourself for a food allergy, you are wasting your time and money on an approach that is known to NOT be a cause of ADHD. The same goes for caffeine and suger intake. It has been known for years that sugar intake does not cause ADHD and in the case of caffeine the hyperness goes away after you stop taking it.

So I really dislike the thread that I created because it misleads people into treating themselves with unproven (and possibly unsafe) methods and medicines.


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Old 11-17-08, 11:02 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I

Hey Speedo, Just wanted to say Don't feel regrets for posting that; I have been researching everything from ADD to Lyme's to various 'fatigue' syndromes, & the controversy is mind-blowing. There is still so much unknown about the brain & all the body processes that affect it, and WOW is the science complex! I think you do a service to bring this up, if only to demonstrate how much research is needed. (p.s.: this is my 1st or 2nd post, so if I screwed anything up, Sorry!) There are so many kind & interesting people on these forums, & thru sharing our experiences we hopefully may eventually have more successful treatment of these truly agonizing conditions. Thank you for your efforts! Keep it up.
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Old 11-17-08, 11:23 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I

51. Stress. . .

I have to go put the kids to bed and get some work done but after that I will come back and edit in some of the information from my first Stress Management Group session. . .

After reading through the description of being overly stress, I have to wonder if I have AADD or just suffer from excessive stress. . .
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Old 11-17-08, 11:41 PM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I

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Originally Posted by speedo View Post
So I really dislike the thread that I created because it misleads people into treating themselves with unproven (and possibly unsafe) methods and medicines.
It's not your thread, it's human nature that's the problem. It is also difficult for people to find access to a professional assessment from an ADHD expert. No surprise people are self-diagnosing themselves online and then attempting to treat themselves.
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Old 11-18-08, 01:21 AM
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Re: 50 conditions that mimic ADHD, PART I

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Originally Posted by speedo View Post
... So I really dislike the thread that I created because it misleads people into treating themselves with unproven (and possibly unsafe) methods and medicines.
If they read the entire thread, hopefully they'll understand it's not causes.

But if they rule out some other things, they'll end up back here with the rest of us, anyway. And perhaps resolved other issues along the way.

So it's all good discussion. And always a learning experience, which is why I'm here.

Thank you.
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dx - ADHD combined, at this point. 7/2009: now w/anxiety
rx - things the Dr had me try: Wellbutrin, Strattera, methylphenidate, Adderall, Vyvanse,
other trials: SAM-e, Fish oil, Mg, 5-htp
---! I need to update this. I'll put that on the list


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