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  #61  
Old 08-19-11, 01:20 AM
deannalynne deannalynne is offline
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

"I've always been told that to have an actual learning disability, you have to have average to above average intelligence (on an IQ test)."

When I was diagnosed with ADD, I also explained to my doctor how frustrating it is for me that I can excel at every subject except math (and math-related sciences) and he said that was a good indication that I have a learning disability.

"since this is the only thread on LD here I expected some tips on management or the 'subtypes" ( if that exists? )."

Dyslexia (confusing words and letters) is most common, but there are others such as the math one. Apparently, there are different types of the math one as well (too lazy to look up the spelling). Some are bad at chronology, others sequencing, and others at spatial reasoning. And then there is math anxiety and test anxiety, but I am not sure if those are LD's or something else.
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Old 04-23-12, 09:56 AM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Since there's only one thread about this I figured I'd post it here. Hope that's all right.

I'd never considered that I might have a learning disability, but I've always had problems studying for school and reading books, so I did a search on Google to see if there were any tools that could help me read. And I found the Eye Level Reading Ruler that is supposed to help people with ADHD, dyslexia and the Irlen Syndrome.

I'd never heard of Irlen so I looked it up and recognised its symptoms. So then I found this page and some of the examples on that page are exactly what I see when I read: http://irlen.com/distortioneffects.php

Later, I read about the symptoms of dyslexia. I didn't think I had it because I don't have any trouble with spelling. And that's when I read about the different types of dyslexia. I've always had problems with maths, but my family didn't think I could have dyscalculia. Anyway, I read about how you can have trouble reading when you have dyslexia (and that not all people with dyslexia mix up letters, etc) and that's when I realised I might have it. I also have trouble writing my thoughts down on paper and describing what I mean (not sure if this could be a symptom of dyslexia?).

But my question is: if you have dyslexia, how do you know what problems are caused by your ADHD and what problems are caused by the dyslexia?

Are the examples shown on that Irlen page part of dyslexia, or could they be ADHD symptoms as well?
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  #63  
Old 04-24-12, 01:53 AM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

To pull up threads on the LD site, go down the page to the part marked “Display Options”. Change the box that says “From the” to a setting that shows a longer time – you get to pick from the options. For example, set it to “Last 75 Days” and then hit “Show Threads” and several threads will appear.

You can also hit “New Thread” to start a new thread.

To try to answer your question – it sort of depends. Different countries use different criteria. In the US dyslexia is called “Reading Disorder” and from what I can tell on my own report, it is specific to the reading, spelling and comprehension problems and also the visual distortion like on the website you gave. I am pretty sure visual distortions are not part of ADHD.

My disorganization, poor working memory poor auditory memory, time blindness are more attributed to my ADHD-PI. But, I have seen dyslexia web sites out of the UK which put the disorganization, time problems, and memory problems as part of dyslexia.

Comprehension problems and getting thoughts down can be either due to ADHD or dyslexia.

I saw the BBC documentary “Kara Tointon: Don’t Call Me Stupid” (it is on YouTube) and my problems were so much like Kara’s that I had an educational evaluation done. That diagnosed the dyslexia but they also picked up on some possible attention problems and I have a diagnosis of reading disorder (dyslexia) and ADHD-PI.
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Old 06-10-12, 02:49 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Thats me in a hand basket.
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Old 09-09-12, 03:57 AM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Yes Andi good article ,thanks for sharing it?
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Old 09-16-12, 04:28 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Good post and thanks; it made me weep reading it because I identified so much with it.
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Old 11-30-12, 12:38 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

i'm glad you touched on the whole "learning disabilities only affect children" thing. i have dyscalculia that i got tested for as an adult. i've always had an issue with maths but it wasn't something the teachers at my school picked up on ever, even though i never got above a 40% in a maths exam (and never will) and it took getting a 3% in the exam for my compulsory stats class at uni before i actually had something to work with.
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  #68  
Old 12-17-12, 10:55 AM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

come out from behind the curtain Andy and recive a well deserved curtain call's. knowledge like this is a key to unlock some shackles that have crippled me all life I feel better about me just reading it will go back and high light some points thank you
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Old 02-17-13, 04:07 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunacie View Post
Yeah, there is. It's called Dyscalculia.
from: http://www.dyscalculia.org/symptoms.html
I can relate to all of it. I was somehow able to get through most of my math classes with barely passing grades with lots of hard work, lots of tutoring.

But I remember crying with arithmetic stuff back in elementary school. Even in a marketing class where we had to use numbers I passed, I was able to apply formulas etc but I had a hard time when it came to isolating variables, I never knew when to divide, multiply etc so I lost points in solving equations. I don't picture anything in my mind while using numbers, I always tried to learn by heart when to use divisions etc, I'm not using logic when I calculate things. I really cannot do mental arithmetic, calculating tips at the restaurant I feel ashamed when I'm with friends and I try to hide the fact i'm trying to calculate it with my phone. I sometimes am late from my breaks at work if I take my 15 min break at let's say 11:03 instead of 11:00. If I go at 11, I know by heart I have to be back at 11:15, but if I go at 11:03 I might miscalculate and think it's 11:19 instead of 11:18, if I don't take the time to really think.

I find the IQ exercises about shape sequences and number sequences painful and exasperating.

If I know I won't have anymore math classes ever, is it worth it to look into diagnosis or I just can assume I have this disorder, since there are no treatments for it? Like, once you know you have dyscalculia, what can you do about it?

I'm pretty sure it's not problems caused by my ADHD because even on optimal dosage I still find mental arithmetics super hard... should I get tested or should I just not care?
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Old 02-17-13, 04:46 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

I generally passed math classes (sometimes barely passing), but I ran into
a major wall when I had to learn algebra as a freshman. I could not do it.
I've always transcribed numbers, whether I'm writing them down or dialing
them on a phone.

I didn't know I likely have discalculia until I was in my late 50's. I don't see
much point in my trying to change things now. If you're younger than me,
there are things that may be helpful.

Software has been developed to help with this issue.
Neuro-sensory educational therapy has been effective treatment for some.
Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) to the parietal lobe during
numerical learning has shown improvement.
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Old 03-09-13, 04:36 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

This article really spoke to me!! WOW! Thanks for posting!!!
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Old 06-13-13, 06:44 AM
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Angry Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

OMG.. I feel as if I have read my whole life story within 5 minutes... I relate to every single word. I do hope that a cure is found for this awful and debilitating syndrome! And for a very long long time I honestly thought I was the only one! This awful syndrome has stolen too many years from my me that I will never get back!

Thank you for a great article!!
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  #73  
Old 06-25-13, 09:40 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Thank you so much for sharing this Andi, I was tearing up reading it. I can relate so much with it because one of my best friends was diagnosed with it and I witnessed how very frustrating it can be.

- J.H.

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Old 07-08-13, 01:50 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andi View Post
I found this today and I think it truly helps many of us understand and appreciate what the LD student/adult goes through emotionally. It's something that many of us need to remember from time to time...WE are not alone!!! Looking through the list I believe all of us can identify with many points in our own disorders. As forum members we need to remember this when addressing/communicating with others.





1. Shame

People growing up with a learning disability often feel a sense of shame. For some, it is a great relief to receive the diagnosis while for others the label only serves to further stigmatize them. For many adults, especially older adults, an accurate diagnosis was unavailable. These individuals were frequently labeled as mentally retarded, written off as being unable to learn, and most passed through the school system without acquiring basic academic skills.

Sadly, these feelings of shame often cause the individual to hide their difficulties. Rather than risk being labeled as stupid or accused of being lazy, some adults deny their learning disability as a defense mechanism. Internalized negative labels of stupidity and incompetence usually result in a poor self concept and lack of confidence (Gerber, Ginsberg, & Reiff, 1992)

Some adults feel ashamed of the type of difficulties they are struggling to cope with such as basic literacy skills, slow processing, attention difficulties, chronic forgetfulness, organizational difficulties, etc.

The following myths about learning disabilities have perpetuated the general public’s negative perception about learning disabilities:

Myth #1

People with learning disabilities have below average intelligence and cannot learn.

Fact

People with learning disabilities have average to above average intelligence (Gerber. 1998). In fact, studies indicate that as many as 33% of students with LD are gifted (Baum, 1985; Brody & Mills, 1997; Jones, 1986). With proper recognition, intervention and lots of hard work, children and adults with learning disabilities can learn and succeed!

Myth #2

Learning disabilities are just an excuse for irresponsible, unmotivated or lazy people.

Fact

Learning disabilities are caused by neurological impairments not character flaws. In fact, the National Information Centre for Adults and Youth with Disabilities makes a point of saying that people with learning disabilities are not lazy or unmotivated (NICHCY , 2002).

Myth #3

Learning disabilities only affect children. Adults grow out of learning disabilities.

Fact

It is now known that LD continues throughout the individual’s lifespan and “may even intensify in adulthood as tasks and environmental demands change” (Michaels, 1994a). Sadly, many adults, especially older adults, have never been formally diagnosed with a learning disability. In fact, the majority of people with learning disabilities are not diagnosed until they reach adulthood (LDA, 1996)

Myth #4

Dyslexia and learning disability are the same thing.

Fact

Dyslexia is a type of learning disability. It is not a another term for learning disability. It is a specific language based disorder affecting a person’s ability to read, write and verbally express themselves. Unfortunately, careless use of the term has expanded it so that it has become, for some, an equivalent for "learning disability".

Myth #5

Learning disabilities are only academic in nature. They do not affect other areas of a person’s life.

Fact

Some people with learning disabilities have isolated difficulties in reading, writing or mathematics. However, most people with learning disabilities have more than one area of difficulty. Dr. Larry Silver asserts that "learning disabilities are life disabilities". He writes, “The same disabilities that interfere with reading, writing, and arithmetic also will interfere with sports and other activities, family life, and getting along with friends." (Silver, 1998)

Typically, students with LD have other major difficulties in one or more of the following areas:

* motor coordination
* time management
* attention
* organizational skills
* processing speed


* Social skills needed to make friends and maintaining relationships
* emotional maturation
* verbal expression
* memory



Many adults with learning disabilities have difficulty in performing basic everyday living tasks such as shopping, budgeting, filling out a job application form or reading a recipe. They may also have difficulty with making friends and maintaining relationships. Vocational and job demands create additional challenges for young people with learning disabilities.

Myth #6

Adults with learning disabilities cannot succeed in higher education.

Fact

More and more adults with learning disabilities are going to college or university and succeeding (Gerber and Reiff 1994). With the proper accommodations and support, adults with learning disabilities can be successful at higher education.

2. Fear

Another emotional difficulty for adults with learning disabilities is fear. This emotion is often masked by anger or anxiety. Tapping into the fear behind the anger and/or the anxiety response is often the key for adults to cope with the emotional fallout of learning disabilities.

Feelings of fear may be related one or more of the following issues:

* fear of being found out
* fear of failure
* fear of judgment or criticism
* fear of rejection

Fear of Being Found Out

Many adults with learning disabilities live with fear of being found out. They develop coping strategies to hide their disability. For example, an adult who can hardly read might pretend to read a newspaper. Other adults may develop gregarious personalities to hide their difficulties or focus on other abilities that do not present learning barriers. Unfortunately some adults will have developed negative strategies such as quitting their job rather than risking the humiliation of being terminated because their learning disability makes it difficult for them to keep up with work demands.

The fear of being found out is particularly troublesome for many older adults who have never been diagnosed with a learning disability or those who received inappropriate support. Such adults were frequently misdiagnosed with mental retardation, inappropriately placed in programs for the mentally disabled, and/or stigmatized by teachers and classmates. In later life, these adults often return to learning through adult literacy programs in order make up for lost educational opportunities. Seeking help is a difficult step forward for these adults because it requires them to stop hiding their disability. The simple act of entering a classroom can be an anxiety producing experience for adults who have been wrongly labeled and/or mistreated by the educational system. For these adults, returning to a learning environment is truly an act of courage!

Low literacy skills and academic difficulties are not the only type of learning disabilities adults try to hide. Adults with social skill difficulties may live in constant fear of revealing social inadequacies. For example, an adult who has trouble understanding humour, may pretend to laugh at a joke even through they don’t understand it. They may also hide their social difficulties by appearing to be shy and withdrawn. On the other hand, hyperactive adults may cover up their attention difficulties by using a gregarious personality to entertain people.

Fear of Failure

The National Adult Literacy Survey, 1992, found that 58% of adult with self-reported learning disabilities lacked the basic functional reading and writing skills needed to experience job and academic success (Kirsch, 1993). Most of these adults have not graduated high school due to the failure of the school system to recognize and/or accommodate their learning disability. Needless to say, adult literacy programs are a second chance to learn the basic academic skills missed out in public school. As mentioned above, going back into an educational environment is often a fearful experience for adults with learning disabilities. One of the main reasons for this is the fear of failure. Many adults reason that, if they have failed before, what is to stop them failing again and, if they do fail again, then this failure must mean they, themselves, are failures.. The tendency for adults with learning disabilities to personalize failure (i.e. failure makes ME a failure) is perhaps the biggest self-esteem buster for adult learners. Educators need to be aware of these fears to help learner’s understand that failure does not make them a failure and making mistakes is a part of the learning process.

For most people, anxiety about failing is what motivates them to succeed, but for people with learning disabilities this anxiety can be paralyzing. Fear of failure may prevent adults with learning disabilities from taking on new learning opportunities. It might prevent them from participating in social activities, taking on a new job opportunity or enrolling in an adult education course.

One positive characteristic that often helps adults overcome their fear of failure is their ability to come up with innovative strategies to learn and solve problems. These strategies are often attributed to the “learned creativity” that many adults with learning disabilities develop in order to cope with the vocational , social and educational demands in their everyday lives. (Gerber, Ginsberg,& Reiff, 1992).

Fear of Ridicule

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear the ridicule of others. Sadly, these fears often develop after the individual has been routinely ridiculed by teachers, classmates or even family members. The most crushing of these criticisms usually relates to a perceived lack of intelligence or unfair judgments about the person’s degree of motivation or ability to succeed. For example, comments such as “you’ll never amount to anything”, “you could do it if you only tried harder”, or the taunting of classmates about being “in the mental retard class” have enormous emotional effects on individuals with learning disabilities. For many of these adults, especially those with unidentified learning disabilities, these and other negative criticisms, continue to affect their emotional well-being into their adult years. It is not uncommon for adults to internalize the negative criticisms and view themselves as dumb, stupid, lazy, and/or incompetent. Such negative criticisms often fuel the fear adults with learning disabilities have about being found out.

Fear of Rejection

Adults with learning disabilities frequently fear rejection if they are not seen to be as capable as others. If they come from a middle to upper class family where academic achievement is a basic expectation for its members, fear of rejection may be a very real concern. They may also fear that their social skill deficits will preclude them from building meaningful relationships with others and may lead to social rejection. Prior experiences of rejection will likely intensify this sense of fear.

3. Environmental and Emotional Sensitivity

Environmental Sensitivities

Adults are often overwhelmed by too much environmental stimuli (e.g. background noise, more than one person talking at a time, side conversations, reading and listening at the same time). Many people with LD and ADD have specific sensitivities to their environment such as certain fabrics they cannot wear, foods they cannot tolerate, etc.

Emotional Sensitivity

Many adults with learning disabilities see themselves as more emotionally sensitive than other people In its most extreme form, high levels of emotional sensitivity are both a blessing and a weakness. The positive features of this trait helps adults with learning disabilities build meaningful relationships with others. For example, they are often very intuitive and in-tune with both their own and other people's emotions. Sometimes they are actually able to perceive other's thoughts and feelings. However, this strength also serves as weakness due to its propensity to overwhelm the individuals. Emotional difficulties occur when they are unable to cope with the onslaught of emotions they are feeling. Highly sensitive adults with LD may be moved to tears more easily or feel their own and other people’s pain more deeply. For example, Thomas West, writer of "The Minds Eye", not only gives a thorough explanation of Winston Churchill's learning disability, but also describes his sensitive nature. West details Churchill's tendency to break into tears quite easily" (West, 1997) even out in the public eye. He notes one incident in which Churchill was moved to tears after witnessing the devastating effects of a bomb.

This description of Churchill also serves to highlight the strong sense of justice that many adults with learning disabilities possess. Unfortunately, this sense of justice often serves as a double edged sword. On one hand, it is refreshing to behold the passion of many of these individuals in their fight to overcome injustice. While on the other hand, this very passion, when it crosses the line into aggression, can cause social rejection and/or emotional overload. Often the individual may be unaware that their behavior has turned aggressive. They only wish make their point known and have others understand it. This type of over reaction is not a purposeful attempt to hurt anybody. It is more likely to be caused by a difficulty with monitoring their emotions and consequent behavior.

4. Emotional Regulation

Difficulties with regulating emotions are common for highly sensitive adults with learning disabilities. Dr. Kay Walker, describes the connection between learning disabilities and self-regulation problems in her paper “Self Regulation and Sensory Processing for Learning, Attention and Attachment”. She asserts that self-regulation problems frequently occur in those with learning disabilities (Walker, 2000) In its most extreme form, individual may easily shift from one emotion to the next. Others may experience difficulty regulating impulsive thoughts or actions.

Fortunately, most adults have learned to handle their emotional sensitivity to avoid becoming overwhelmed or engaging in negative social interactions. Nevertheless, some adults may be so deeply affected that they become depressed or suffer from anxiety. A lack of school, job and/or social success will likely add to this emotional burden. Some adults with LD, especially those who have been ridiculed by their family members, teachers and/or peers, may be more apt to take criticism to heart because of their experiences and/or their ultra-sensitive nature. Emotional wounds from childhood and youth may cause heightened emotional responses to rejection. In turn, social anxiety and social phobia may result

5. Difficulty Adjusting to Change

Change is scary for everyone, but for people with learning disabilities and other neurological disabilities, change may be particularly difficult. Children with learning disabilities may prefer procedures to stay the same and have a hard time moving from one activity to another. Usually this difficulty becomes less of an issue as the child matures. However, adults with learning disabilities may still experience difficulty adjusting to change in more subtle ways . For example, some adults will have trouble moving from one work task to another without completely finishing the first task before moving on to the next one. Adults with learning disabilities are frequently described as inflexible when it comes to considering another person’s view point or a different way of doing something.

Adjustment to change is difficult for adults with LD because change brings the unexpected. In general, people with learning disabilities are less prepared for the unexpected. The unexpected may bring new learning hurdles, new job demands or new social challenges. Since all these areas can be affected by learning disabilities, it is no wonder why change can produce so much anxiety for adults with learning disabilities.

To avoid the tendency to blame the person for their lack of flexibility, it is important to understand the neurological basis for this difficulty with adjusting to change. With this said, through social skills practice, adults with learning disabilities can improve their ability to tolerate change. In addition, parents, instructors, and other professionals can help adults with learning disabilities by making transition processes easier through understanding and accommodating the adults’ needs.



http://www.ldpride.net/emotions.htm



If I may, you can also have what I call "verbal dyslexia", which my Dr. told me is very real...I can't remember the technical term for it, but I know that it is so pervasive when under stress ex. work, and the knowledge of what I may say wrong makes it even worse. I sound like I'm clueless, when in actuality, I am well informed.
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Old 12-29-13, 10:23 PM
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Re: A MUST READ!!! Top Five Emotional Difficulties of Adults with LD

Thanks for posting this!
I was diagnosed with a learning disability but im not sure if thats all i have because it really has paralyzed me in a way, my life has been at a stand still since i graduated high school, which i wasnt even supposed to graduate. I was diagnosed it a year or so ago so i, not sure if thats the whole problem.

Last edited by Diony; 12-29-13 at 10:32 PM.. Reason: edited
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