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Old 01-09-10, 06:21 PM
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The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

In some way, shape or form, we all go through the grief process whether we are diagnosed or come to this conclusion all on our own.

It is as different and personal to each individual as their finger prints. I found this article for those who are new here, new to the diagnosis or didn't know this happens to all of us.

I find myself posting about it often, probably because I myself was not made aware of it. I think that had I known what I was going through, it would have made it a little easier.

Unfortunately, the Psychiatrist who started me on medication after being officially diagnosed, didn't know much about ADD. I wasn't given information about the medication or what I could expect in the beginning. I spent 2 long years depressed, lost and mostly in denial, fighting my ADD and its symptoms. What a futile waste of time and energy!

I hope this is helpful to others!
In some way, shape or form, we all go through the grief process whether we are diagnosed or come to this conclusion all on our own.

It is as different and personal to each individual as their finger prints. I found this article for those who are new here, new to the diagnosis or didn't know this happens to all of us.

I find myself posting about it often, probably because I myself was not made aware of it. I think that had I known what I was going through, it would have made it a little easier.

Unfortunately, the Psychiatrist who started me on medication after being officially diagnosed, didn't know much about ADD. I wasn't given information about the medication or what I could expect in the beginning. I spent 2 long years depressed, lost and mostly in denial, fighting my ADD and its symptoms. What a futile waste of time and energy!

I hope this is helpful to others!
This article originally appeared in the November/December 2000 issue of LDA Newsbriefs. For
more information on the Learning Disabilities Association of America, please visit the LDA
website at www.ldanatl.org.
1
GRIEF: THE FORGOTTEN EMOTION
OF
ADULTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES
Kevin T. Blake, Ph.D.
One emotional concern that has far too often been overlooked in adults who have
for the first time been diagnosed as having learning disabilities and/or ADHD is that of
grief. Grief is a normal reaction to a traumatic life event (i.e., death in the family,
diagnosis of cancer, loss of a job, diagnosis of a learning disability, etc.) Grief has
definite stages which may lead to resolution as was demonstrated by Kubler-Ross’ work
with terminal cancer patients in England. Persons going through a grief reaction may
experience a loss of interest in things they previously found pleasurable, depressed mood,
sluggishness, problems with sleep and/or appetite, as well as guilt. Grief has a natural
progression and is usually time limited.
Murphy and LeVert (1995) wrote about the six stages of coping that a person may
experience following the diagnosis of ADHD. These can be applied to those with
learning disabilities. They are as follows:
Stage 1: Relief and Optimism
I’m not retarded, I’m not schizophrenic, I’m not Bi-Polar or just plain stupid. I have
ADHD….
Stage 2: Denial
There is no such thing as ADHD, I’m just lazy…
Stage 3: Anger and Resentment
If my third grade teacher would have noticed this, I may have gone to college….
Stage 4: Grief
My undiagnosed ADHD made life so painful for me…
How do I cope with ADHD and repair the damage of the past….
Stage 5: Accommodation
I accept I have ADHD, I am using work/school accommodations to compensate for it…
2
Initially it was believed the grief reaction adults would have to receiving a
diagnosis of learning disabilities and/or ADHD would be non-existent or at the very
worst, quite mild. However, as clinical antidotes have been accumulated this does not
necessarily appear to be the case. The severity and chronicity of the grief reaction an
adult with learning disabilities and/or ADHD may experience appears to be quite
variable. Individuals with very mild learning disabilities and/or ADHD symptoms
without a history of significant life trauma may experience a minimum grief reaction. If
the person does have a grief reaction its course tends to be short and that person reaches a
level of acceptance of the disability quickly, with few relapses. However, a person with
severe learning disabilities and/or ADHD as well as more pronounced life trauma may
have a chronic and intense grief reaction. In such cases, a person may need individual
counseling, and psychoeducation to learn more about the disability and/or medication to
help treat depression, etc.
Regarding prolonged grief, Goldstein (1997) wrote: It has been reportedly
suggested that adults with ADHD and LD struggle with grief over their perceived
incompetence and lifetime difficulty with meeting everyday expectations (p. 260). Often
adults with learning disabilities and ADHD have problems with low self-esteem as a
result of their more difficult life course created by the disability. As Ryan (1994)
wrote…when the dyslexic succeeds, he is likely to attribute his success to luck. When he
fails, he simply sees himself as stupid (p. 9). This low self-esteem may compound a grief
reaction, by making it more severe and chronic. It is not uncommon for an adult with
learning disabilities and/or ADHD to repeatedly re-experience grief reactions after the
initial experience of grief. This re-experiencing of the grief reaction tends to be triggered
by present day life traumas and perceived failures, which the adult with learning
disabilities and/or ADHD believes are caused by the disability. Hence, unchecked grief
can be a constant companion.
Sometimes a person can become lost in grief and develop a Major Depressive
Episode. If the person goes at least two weeks with a significantly depressed mood, is
socially withdrawn and has lost interest in things the person usually is quite interested in,
the person may have clinically significant depression. In such situations, it is important
that the person be assessed by a mental health professional and treated if necessary.
The newly diagnosed adult with learning disabilities and/or ADHD should be
made aware of the potential for a grief reaction and the possibility of a Major Depressive
Episode, which will require a consultation with a mental health professional. This should
be done by the diagnostician. Just sharing this with an adult with learning disabilities
and/or ADHD can help to normalize the grieving process and reduce the risk of
complications in its progression. In a very real sense, knowledge is power.
Often the loved ones of an adult recently diagnosed with learning disabilities
and/or ADHD are negatively affected by the individual’s grief reaction. The diagnosed
adult may become less attentive to personal responsibilities, lash out toward others, or
become withdrawn. Such behaviors can make family life taxing and difficult. It is
important for the family and loved ones of the adult with learning disabilities and/or
3


ADHD to know that grief is a normal human reaction to their
loss or disability. If the
person’s depression and grief is significantly taxing to the family, family therapy should
be considered.
Sometimes the stress of learning to compensate for and cope with one’s learning
disability and/or ADHD can be overwhelming. For example, learning how to use
Recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic, a voice activated word processor, or how to work
with an ADHD coach while one struggles to maintain home and/or school/work
responsibilities can be quite stressful. Often the initial attempt at accommodation may be
ineffective. Finding the accommodations that are most helpful may be the result of a
prolonged course of trial and error. This process can be disheartening, which may further
complicate the grief reaction. Families and loved ones need to be aware of these new
stresses in the recently diagnosed adult’s life. Their understanding may serve to diffuse
family tensions.
Employers also need to understand the challenge facing the newly diagnosed
adult and how the disability may affect his or her productivity. Often newly diagnosed
employees have not met employer expectations, and the employees will need to remedy
this. Employees need to learn about their disabilities and how to accommodate them.
These employees may not know their rights, how to ask appropriately for reasonable
accommodations, or how their disability is manifested. Employers should be encouraged
to instruct their personnel manager to expedite this process by being open to the
recommendations of consulting professionals who have worked with the employees. An
informed employer will be aware that the process for a newly diagnosed adult to become
a better worker can be emotionally difficult for the employee. Thus, it is important for an
employer to be flexible. This may include reducing the employee’s responsibilities or
granting a temporary leave of absence (i.e., mental health days). It is important for an
employer to remember that often it is less expensive to help the employee through this
transition than it is to terminate the individual, search for, hire and train another
employee. The above assumes there have been no violations of the employee’s civil
rights (i.e., ADA, etc.).
The area of emotional and mental health concerns of adults with learning
disabilities and/or ADHD is quite complex and new. This article has dealt with the grief
reaction often experienced by newly diagnosed adults. There are many more types of
significant emotional problems experienced by adults with learning disabilities and/or
ADHD, which the LDA mental health committee will address in future issues of
Newsbriefs.
4
References:
Goldstein, S. (1997).


Managing Attention and Learning Disorders in Late Adolescence
and Adulthood: A Guide for Practitioners. New York: John Wiley and Sons.
Murphy, K. & LeVert, S. (1995). Out of the Fog: Treatment Options and Coping
Strategies for Adult Attention Deficit Disorder. New York: Hyperion.
Ryan, M. (1994). The Other 16 Hours: The Social and Emotional Problems of
Dyslexia. Baltimore, MD: Orton Dyslexia Society.

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Old 01-09-10, 07:29 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Well, just be glad that you can move on in life with treatment. There's something to look forward to.

That's a whole lot to read, whew! Ill give a better response later.
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Old 01-09-10, 07:37 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

That really makes sense and I am glad you took the time to post it. Thanks.

Since I've been dealing with the dx for only about 2 months, I have been experiencing some of these feelings and didn't understand that there would be a progression, I just thought it was a weird response.
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Old 01-09-10, 08:13 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Your welcome Lucky and meridian. Glad to hear it has helped someone. The fact that you both found this forum will help you along too. I grew more since I found it a couple of months ago, than I had in the 2 years since diagnosis.


[QUOTE from Meridian]
Since I've been dealing with the dx for only about 2 months, I have been experiencing some of these feelings and didn't understand that there would be a progression, I just thought it was a weird response.
(end quote)

The same happened to me Meridian. Every time I would discover something new about my ADD my feelings would change, some good, some bad.

I felt as if that was just the way life was going to be from then on out. I became really depressed. Even though I sought out a therapist that I liked, after 6 months I still wasn't feeling much better.

I was able to figure out some important things about myself and how my childhood has effected my adult life and the decisions I make. This is true for everyone to some extent.

Having ADD makes this even more of a challenging concept to grasp. Especially if it has effected us in a negative way. Its like smog that always lingers instead of fog, which lifts once and a while.

You make a great point, that it is a progression. That is the point I was trying to make. I don't want anyone else to think and feel stuck, like I did.

Had that Psychiatrist just given me some basics or at the least, point me in the direction of some resources, a lot of the depression could have been avoided. It makes me mad knowing that now.

It never ceases to amaze me how little is know about ADD. Even in the mental health field, unless they specialize in it, their knowledge goes about as far as the general publics. 98% of what they think they know is all myth. Sad eh?

I know that is a ton of reading and information. Maybe it would be wise to break it down and print it. Absorb a little at a time.

I have noticed, ADDers are either readers or not. I really have not seen anyone in between! Correct me if I'm wrong!




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Old 02-27-10, 03:02 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

.............I'm glad you asked that question ...the one about readers or not ......I was beginning to think that I was the only person with ADHD who not only loved to read, but was downright obsessive about it .....


.............I have always been a reader, and i high school they tested us to see if we were interested in a speed reading class, and as a High school sophomore I read 900 words a minute with 90% comprehension.....

.........course, it's about the only thing I can do without meds....that and cooking ...not cleaning up afterward mind you, just the cooking ....
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Old 02-27-10, 03:26 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

The only grief I feel at the moment is why oh why didn't I do something about this earlier in life. Years and years of pain and anguish could have been eliminated. Right now I'm feelin' like I'm about to get a do over in my life and that makes me feel pretty gosh darn good. Time to wipe the slate clean,sharpen up all those talents I had been born with and boldly go where I have never gone before...without all the anxiety and second guessing. Begone fog!
Uh...I must be on one of my high moments. Lets see how I feel when its low tide.
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Old 02-27-10, 04:45 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

I guess for me, I have heard about ADHD - but always just kind of thought it was for those hyper children with temper tantrums all the time. I, as well as people around me, have always noticed myself as a little different; however, after many years, I just left it at that. I guess there was never really a moment where I was hit with it, since I had it for about as long as I can remember, it just grew with me over time.

About four or five months ago, I was talking to someone I work with, and they mentioned that they have ADD and how much the medication helped out. Wait? That's dumb? Only little kids can have that stuff? After I heard him talk about it, I didn't really agree like, "Hey yeah! That's me too!" I just shook my head and went on with my day. After a few weeks, it kept bothering me so I decided to research the condition and see what it's all about. It was an eye opener to say the least.

Yeahhhh, so I have the conditions - but I mean, I don't have ADD. Me, being me, I don't like to complain. I am not a complainer. So now I have to go to a doctor and complain about silly things. I can't clean my house, I can't stop moving my legs. Those are stupid things, and I know someone who moves their legs a lot, and I know someone else who doesn't clean all the time. After a little longer, it hit me that, I don't have one condition, I have them all. Alright, screw it, I'll go take a few tests online and then go see my doctor.

OK, so I manned up and spoke with the doctor. He agrees that it does sound a lot like ADHD, and that I should start some medication. After a few months of medications, they are helping my problems; however, I still just felt kind of by myself. I know this isn't like some life threatning disease or anything, but I still just found it hard to relate to people. Oh, wait! There is that forum that I remember browsing through a few times over the past month or two. Eh, it can't hurt, I'll give it a try.

So I signed up on these forums, and it has indeed, really been the missing puzzle piece for me. I read some of the threads that we joke around in, and it's awesome that I can relate to an entire group of people. "The Do's and Don'ts of an ADDer" thread was really eye opening to me. You mean to tell me, every thing that I have marked off as "dumb & insignificant" in my life, other people have it happen to them? Wow! Even though I will probably never meet any of you, I think it's great that we can all relate to each other and help each other out. These forums have helped me with my grief process exponentially! So thanks to the founders down to the person who signs up and posts one question. You never know who you might just help out!
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Old 04-30-10, 09:40 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Well I hope you get this,,,Im not sure if Im doing it right,lol,,,,I just wanted to say that you just made my day with this article. I had no idea about the Grief part..I was so happy to find out that I wasnt just stupid.....then I started to think about how things would have been in my life if I would have been "Normal"? Hence the depression and feeling totally overwhelmed most of the time. Thank you so much,,,,,how I just have to learn how to deal with all this
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Old 04-30-10, 10:11 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

I'm way passed the grief stage and I'm not even diagnosed yet.
I suppose I go looking for the diagnosis rather than a doctor surprising me by saying that I may have it.

I do sometimes feel a bit upset about my learning disorders but I did get help for them in my school years, though sometimes I wonder if they could gone to more effort to make them vanish completely.

In these past three years I've been finding out more about myself and why I was so different. First I discovered dyslexia and it seemed to fit me like a glove, but I wasn't severe enough to be diagnosed though some symptoms I have I can only find in dyslexia...ok maybe Irlen's syndrome, which is quite similar anyway.

Then I found out about Asperger's and everything about that disorder fit me even more.

Then I by luck picked up a book about ADHD on sale. I thought well I know I don't have it but I'll read it anyway, only to realise that too fit me and explained some things that made me different from many with AS.

So as you can see finding about ADHD wasn't a massive surprise. I had been through it twice already, maybe even four times if you count Irlen's and dyspraxia.

I no longer think 'what if'. Well maybe things may have been better for me if I was diagnosed sooner. Maybe I wouldn't have been pulled out of school, be home schooled then go back to high school then go back into home school, finally to finish the last three years in a college (TAFE). What an impact that's made on my employment history (or lack of).
But you can't go back. What happened happened.
All I can do now is keep living my life, despite having these many disorders. If I didn't know I had these disorders then I'd still wonder why I was lazy, not as intelligent as some people about things (finding out about AS has recently made me want to improve my knowledge) and wondering why I still couldn't get a job. At least I know now, but still, I'm not going to let it stop me from living my life and reaching my goals.
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Old 05-01-10, 07:08 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Even though I was dx'ed at 7, I just recently got the acceptance stage. My entire life I was against it... if only I would try harder, or maybe if my teachers were better, etc...

I can sit here and say I have ADD and not feel confilicted inside, because I know that even though I will not be the same successful person as the non-ADDer, I can still be successful and lead a fulfilling life FOR ME. That is the goal.
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Old 05-01-10, 09:37 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

never went through a grief period. i threw a party! Finally i know what is wrong! my feelings and thoughts are valid! my awkwardness of losing everything i touch and never getting anything done has a purpose now and im not lazy like people have claimed! WooHoo!!! i can get better! i can cope better! i can explain WHY i do crazy stupid crap!!! And the best part is my friends understand me!!!
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Old 02-10-11, 10:00 AM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Thanks for this post. Yesterday was very rough for me and I got through it. I laid in bed all day and grieved uncontrollably. I am very mad at myself for where I am at. I feel like two deaths occurred: the marriage i wanted that i left because i was stupid and the old me who never knew why I kept failing. I knew I had something like ADD yet not until recently did I see how it affected everything I touched through my own research. I need to be active and maybe redo a lot of things in my life. I still love my exwife deeply and the hardest part now is letting go of her. I need to try harder. Thanks.
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Old 02-10-11, 10:48 AM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nelsonadd View Post
Thanks for this post. Yesterday was very rough for me and I got through it. I laid in bed all day and grieved uncontrollably. I am very mad at myself for where I am at. I feel like two deaths occurred: the marriage i wanted that i left because i was stupid and the old me who never knew why I kept failing. I knew I had something like ADD yet not until recently did I see how it affected everything I touched through my own research. I need to be active and maybe redo a lot of things in my life. I still love my exwife deeply and the hardest part now is letting go of her. I need to try harder. Thanks.
Oh gee,buddy. I also know what it feels like to have the rug pulled out from underneath and your whole world smashed to smithereens. I'm sorry you're feeling like that. It felt like being pulled inside out through my little toe. If you think you are ADD try working on that aspect of your life. It seemed to help me tremendously when I found our WHY I was such a loser.

A failed marriage is like a death and we do have to grieve. It will take time.
Take care.
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Old 02-17-11, 04:03 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leapofaith View Post
In some way, shape or form, we all go through the grief process whether we are diagnosed or come to this conclusion all on our own.

It is as different and personal to each individual as their finger prints. I found this article for those who are new here, new to the diagnosis or didn't know this happens to all of us.

I find myself posting about it often, probably because I myself was not made aware of it. I think that had I known what I was going through, it would have made it a little easier.

Unfortunately, the Psychiatrist who started me on medication after being officially diagnosed, didn't know much about ADD. I wasn't given information about the medication or what I could expect in the beginning. I spent 2 long years depressed, lost and mostly in denial, fighting my ADD and its symptoms. What a futile waste of time and energy!

I hope this is helpful to others!

This article originally appeared in the November/December 2000 issue of LDA Newsbriefs. For
more information on the Learning Disabilities Association of America, please visit the LDA
website at www.ldanatl.org.
1
GRIEF: THE FORGOTTEN EMOTION
OF
ADULTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES
Kevin T. Blake, Ph.D.
One emotional concern that has far too often been overlooked in adults who have
for the first time been diagnosed as having learning disabilities and/or ADHD is that of
grief. Grief is a normal reaction to a traumatic life event (i.e., death in the family,
diagnosis of cancer, loss of a job, diagnosis of a learning disability, etc.) Grief has
definite stages which may lead to resolution as was demonstrated by Kubler-Ross’ work
with terminal cancer patients in England. Persons going through a grief reaction may
experience a loss of interest in things they previously found pleasurable, depressed mood,
sluggishness, problems with sleep and/or appetite, as well as guilt. Grief has a natural
progression and is usually time limited.
Murphy and LeVert (1995) wrote about the six stages of coping that a person may
experience following the diagnosis of ADHD. These can be applied to those with
learning disabilities. They are as follows:
Stage 1: Relief and Optimism
I’m not retarded, I’m not schizophrenic, I’m not Bi-Polar or just plain stupid. I have
ADHD….
Stage 2: Denial
There is no such thing as ADHD, I’m just lazy…
Stage 3: Anger and Resentment
If my third grade teacher would have noticed this, I may have gone to college….
Stage 4: Grief
My undiagnosed ADHD made life so painful for me…
How do I cope with ADHD and repair the damage of the past….
Stage 5: Accommodation
I accept I have ADHD, I am using work/school accommodations to compensate for it…
2
Initially it was believed the grief reaction adults would have to receiving a
diagnosis of learning disabilities and/or ADHD would be non-existent or at the very
worst, quite mild. However, as clinical antidotes have been accumulated this does not
necessarily appear to be the case. The severity and chronicity of the grief reaction an
adult with learning disabilities and/or ADHD may experience appears to be quite
variable. Individuals with very mild learning disabilities and/or ADHD symptoms
without a history of significant life trauma may experience a minimum grief reaction. If
the person does have a grief reaction its course tends to be short and that person reaches a
level of acceptance of the disability quickly, with few relapses. However, a person with
severe learning disabilities and/or ADHD as well as more pronounced life trauma may
have a chronic and intense grief reaction. In such cases, a person may need individual
counseling, and psychoeducation to learn more about the disability and/or medication to
help treat depression, etc.
Regarding prolonged grief, Goldstein (1997) wrote: It has been reportedly
suggested that adults with ADHD and LD struggle with grief over their perceived
incompetence and lifetime difficulty with meeting everyday expectations (p. 260). Often
adults with learning disabilities and ADHD have problems with low self-esteem as a
result of their more difficult life course created by the disability. As Ryan (1994)
wrote…when the dyslexic succeeds, he is likely to attribute his success to luck. When he
fails, he simply sees himself as stupid (p. 9). This low self-esteem may compound a grief
reaction, by making it more severe and chronic. It is not uncommon for an adult with
learning disabilities and/or ADHD to repeatedly re-experience grief reactions after the
initial experience of grief. This re-experiencing of the grief reaction tends to be triggered
by present day life traumas and perceived failures, which the adult with learning
disabilities and/or ADHD believes are caused by the disability. Hence, unchecked grief
can be a constant companion.
Sometimes a person can become lost in grief and develop a Major Depressive
Episode. If the person goes at least two weeks with a significantly depressed mood, is
socially withdrawn and has lost interest in things the person usually is quite interested in,
the person may have clinically significant depression. In such situations, it is important
that the person be assessed by a mental health professional and treated if necessary.
The newly diagnosed adult with learning disabilities and/or ADHD should be
made aware of the potential for a grief reaction and the possibility of a Major Depressive
Episode, which will require a consultation with a mental health professional. This should
be done by the diagnostician. Just sharing this with an adult with learning disabilities
and/or ADHD can help to normalize the grieving process and reduce the risk of
complications in its progression. In a very real sense, knowledge is power.
Often the loved ones of an adult recently diagnosed with learning disabilities
and/or ADHD are negatively affected by the individual’s grief reaction. The diagnosed
adult may become less attentive to personal responsibilities, lash out toward others, or
become withdrawn. Such behaviors can make family life taxing and difficult. It is
important for the family and loved ones of the adult with learning disabilities and/or
3


ADHD to know that grief is a normal human reaction to their
loss or disability. If the
person’s depression and grief is significantly taxing to the family, family therapy should
be considered.
Sometimes the stress of learning to compensate for and cope with one’s learning
disability and/or ADHD can be overwhelming. For example, learning how to use
Recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic, a voice activated word processor, or how to work
with an ADHD coach while one struggles to maintain home and/or school/work
responsibilities can be quite stressful. Often the initial attempt at accommodation may be
ineffective. Finding the accommodations that are most helpful may be the result of a
prolonged course of trial and error. This process can be disheartening, which may further
complicate the grief reaction. Families and loved ones need to be aware of these new
stresses in the recently diagnosed adult’s life. Their understanding may serve to diffuse
family tensions.
Employers also need to understand the challenge facing the newly diagnosed
adult and how the disability may affect his or her productivity. Often newly diagnosed
employees have not met employer expectations, and the employees will need to remedy
this. Employees need to learn about their disabilities and how to accommodate them.
These employees may not know their rights, how to ask appropriately for reasonable
accommodations, or how their disability is manifested. Employers should be encouraged
to instruct their personnel manager to expedite this process by being open to the
recommendations of consulting professionals who have worked with the employees. An
informed employer will be aware that the process for a newly diagnosed adult to become
a better worker can be emotionally difficult for the employee. Thus, it is important for an
employer to be flexible. This may include reducing the employee’s responsibilities or
granting a temporary leave of absence (i.e., mental health days). It is important for an
employer to remember that often it is less expensive to help the employee through this
transition than it is to terminate the individual, search for, hire and train another
employee. The above assumes there have been no violations of the employee’s civil
rights (i.e., ADA, etc.).
The area of emotional and mental health concerns of adults with learning
disabilities and/or ADHD is quite complex and new. This article has dealt with the grief
reaction often experienced by newly diagnosed adults. There are many more types of
significant emotional problems experienced by adults with learning disabilities and/or
ADHD, which the LDA mental health committee will address in future issues of
Newsbriefs.
4
References:
Goldstein, S. (1997).


Managing Attention and Learning Disorders in Late Adolescence
and Adulthood: A Guide for Practitioners. New York: John Wiley and Sons.
Murphy, K. & LeVert, S. (1995). Out of the Fog: Treatment Options and Coping
Strategies for Adult Attention Deficit Disorder. New York: Hyperion.
Ryan, M. (1994). The Other 16 Hours: The Social and Emotional Problems of
Dyslexia. Baltimore, MD: Orton Dyslexia Society.


Thank you for this. Someone else (i forget who right now, maybe Fortune?) pointed out the grieving process to me and gave me a link...but I couldnt see the connection so much with what was anger and what was denial etc... this is a good guide.
I'm still stuck in the anger/resentment/grief part i think. I went thru the relief and optimism phase for like.. a day and a half.. then I realized after answering some posts and having to examin my history..just how badly it effected me and just how much it touches.
I had a friend offer hope of school and it sounds like a nice idea...but all i can imagine is the stress I went thru in school. I cant handle going thru that again... I dont know what to do w my life still and I still feel like my hwole life was a complete waste of time. I screwed everything up and I cant get that time back now.
so...I hope these phases hurry up and get over with...I dunno what to do w myself in the meantime. Im just... sad and immobile. Ive been trying to get out.. but that only happens if someone plans to go w me. meh...
ayways. for new ppl coming here I think seeing the whole grief phase part of this thread is a little bit helpful at least
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Old 02-17-11, 08:41 PM
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Re: The Grief process after being diagnosed with Adult ADD/ADHD.

I didn't relaize I was in mourning or was actually going through a mourning period after I was diagnosed. I just knew I was dissapointed how ADHD wasn't 'cured' by medication. But it took awhile to get used to work with ADHD, or even to acknowledge I really had it.

I do believe that in order to be successful with ADHD, one must experience and go through this period.
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